Steve Smith: Practice on a splash cymbal for touch

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
They're difficult to control, they bounce all over the place if not clamped down tightly forcing you to really hone e in on your playing area and giving each stroke it's value. (maybe that's the idea)
 

johnwesley

Silver Member
Hello, i watched some videos of Steve Smith saying that he practices on a splash cymbal to develop his touch. Any idea what how he practices on a splash? I mean is he using a splash instead of a ride cymbal, a crash cymbal or he does rolls and rudiments on it?
So you watched videos of Smith talking about practicing on a splash, BUT you didn't look it up? Sure he wasn't "funnin'" you? He's a well known enough guy that even if there's no video of him practicing on the splash, he'd at least have given an explanation of what he meant. Then again maybe he's the guy at Halloween who doesn't hand out candy, just pieces of paper with the names of candy on them. Eh?
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
Until I watched this interview
Oh that makes sense. He's talking about doing it to learn how to play a splash cymbal. Not that mysterious at all.

Hello, i watched some videos of Steve Smith saying that he practices on a splash cymbal to develop his touch. Any idea what how he practices on a splash? I mean is he using a splash instead of a ride cymbal, a crash cymbal or he does rolls and rudiments on it?
He said sticking patterns, but you could do anything-- but do it in a way that makes the cymbal sound good.
 
i haven't done that but it's a great idea to develop your ride control. I used to practice uptempo jazz ride patterns as quietly and quickly as possible, with the heaviest sticks on the loudest most awful sounding ride I had. If you can get that into a nice controlled musical sound, your nice ride will sing.
 
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