Steady Double Bass

Awakened2468

Junior Member
Hey, I'm new to this forum. I have never received lessons, I just play for fun and I am self taught. I was wondering if anyone could give me tips on a better steady double bass beat. I mostly playing thrash and groove metal (mostly thrash) and I am able to play songs like Angel of Death and Coma (Overkill) and things like that. My problem is that for some reason my left leg wants to automatically go faster and I have to force myself to slow down. Do any of you have any tips so I can avoid having that horrible hiccup in the middle of the beat? Thanks.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
It sounds simple but the answer is practice.

You could try to a metronome to keep time.

I would suggest setting it slower than you want to.. focus on making sure each hit is clean and evenly spaced.. increase it 1 bpm per day or something like that. as soon as it gets sloppy dial it back.

It takes years to play good clean fast double bass well. I am guilty myself of wanting to play too fast too quick.. You will be quite happy if you focus on playing clean now then when you get up to speed it will sound great.

make sure both pedals have the same spring tension, beater distance, angle and all that too.. I sometimes adjusting my throne height makes a huge difference in my double bass playing. Sitting low or high changes the feel of playing totally
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
For steady, controlled single strokes I like to practice alternating between subdivisions. For example at 120 bpm, play 16th notes for two bars, then transition to 16th note triplets for two bars, and do this over and over.

Perfect example of this is Judas Priest "painkiller". During the verses you play 16ths, and for the chorus you play 16th trips. The song is at about 105 BPM.

For Left foot control in general, I practice playing with the left foot instead of the right as much as possible. Obviously not all the time, just when I'm specifically working on my left foot.
 
Last edited:

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
How long have you been drumming?
I ask because you have one post here. It is possible you just found the site, but it is also possible your a new drummer.
 

Awakened2468

Junior Member
Hey guys, thanks for responding. Yeah the answer really is just practice. It's just annoying because sometimes when I go faster I tense up. I have to focus on not focusing so much, which sounds weird. When I get that right feeling, it kind of takes control of itself without me focusing on getting to that speed so much. I don't know if that made sense.

Yeah part of the problem may actually be my pedals. The left beater fell off years ago and I just superglued it back in with tape around it lol. They aren't even so I've gotten used to lifting my left leg up a little higher.

Posture is probably another problem because I tend to lean in sometimes when I'm going fast on the double bass. But I realized I don't always need to lean in when I try to go fast. Basically, when I find myself leaning in I get back into a better posture.

Thanks for the advice guys. I really appreciate it.

I started playing almost nine years ago but five of those years I was inactive so I haven't played nine years consecutively. I knew about this website a long time ago every time I would google drumming tips and stuff but never became a member until recently because I'm lazy lol.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
Hey guys, thanks for responding. Yeah the answer really is just practice. It's just annoying because sometimes when I go faster I tense up. I have to focus on not focusing so much, which sounds weird. When I get that right feeling, it kind of takes control of itself without me focusing on getting to that speed so much. I don't know if that made sense.

Yeah part of the problem may actually be my pedals. The left beater fell off years ago and I just superglued it back in with tape around it lol. They aren't even so I've gotten used to lifting my left leg up a little higher.

Posture is probably another problem because I tend to lean in sometimes when I'm going fast on the double bass. But I realized I don't always need to lean in when I try to go fast. Basically, when I find myself leaning in I get back into a better posture.

Thanks for the advice guys. I really appreciate it.

I started playing almost nine years ago but five of those years I was inactive so I haven't played nine years consecutively. I knew about this website a long time ago every time I would google drumming tips and stuff but never became a member until recently because I'm lazy lol.

Repetition is your friend. If anyone plays too fast they tense up.. the only way to avoid that is slow it down and build your strength, endurance, and muscle memory. proper working gear is a pretty big deal too lol.
 

Drumquake

Junior Member
It sounds simple but the answer is practice.

You could try to a metronome to keep time.

I would suggest setting it slower than you want to.. focus on making sure each hit is clean and evenly spaced.. increase it 1 bpm per day or something like that. as soon as it gets sloppy dial it back.

It takes years to play good clean fast double bass well. I am guilty myself of wanting to play too fast too quick.. You will be quite happy if you focus on playing clean now then when you get up to speed it will sound great.

make sure both pedals have the same spring tension, beater distance, angle and all that too.. I sometimes adjusting my throne height makes a huge difference in my double bass playing. Sitting low or high changes the feel of playing totally
...what he said. Really. I'd say this is how you practice any technique. I've always done it myself, and I've always recommended it to my students.

http://drumquake.com/blog/drum-technique-where-to-begin
 

bonerpizza

Silver Member
Do you have decent quality pedals? You don't need AXIS Longboards or anything crazy expensive but if you're using cheap pedals you're not going to get the same feel and precision you would from better gear.

Practice playing along to a metronome while just playing a steady beat with your hands find a tempo you can play comfortably at for a minute or two then gradually increase the speed by 10-20 BPM, focus on keeping your feet consistent volume wise and keeping your feet playing as steady as possible.
 

Awakened2468

Junior Member
I don't really have decent quality pedals. I have some really old Yamaha pedals that have no design and are basically just metal plates. I got it for free several years ago and as I said before, they broke so I just superglued it and put tape around it. I would like longboards because the faster I go the more my foot slides back but I don't have the budget to pay for the AXIS longboards. I was thinking something along the lines of Pearl P932.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
I think 20 BPM is a bit much for a new drummer personally. When talking bass drum speed if you go up 1 BPM per every second day, you'd be over 200 BPM in a year which is faster than most drummers I see doing 16th note kick (clean).

I'd also recommend going longer than a minute. I have been doing 10 minute stretches with a metronome and timer lately, and it has increased my endurance a very large amount. I know plenty of guy who can whip out a fast blast beat or double bass part. but when it comes to playing a long stretch they burn out.


I think at the end of the day the answer is keep practising. It takes years
 
I don't really have decent quality pedals. I have some really old Yamaha pedals that have no design and are basically just metal plates. I got it for free several years ago and as I said before, they broke so I just superglued it and put tape around it. I would like longboards because the faster I go the more my foot slides back but I don't have the budget to pay for the AXIS longboards. I was thinking something along the lines of Pearl P932.
Or the current standard yamaha...any mid-line good company pedals should give you what you need to learn. Years down the road you can get the fancy pedals if you want.
 
Top