Stan Lynch interview

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
I find it interesting how when he left TP, he just checked out of all things drums for a while. Didn't even look back on that career & focused on the road ahead.
Still drums from time to time, but doesn't talk much about his former life.

 

Hewitt2

Senior Member
His parts fit those TP songs so well. Like a nicely worked-in pair of jeans. He is so integral to all of those hits.

I think that his maturity as a musician can at least be partly explained by the fact that drums were somewhat of an afterthought for him. His early interests revolved around guitar/piano which gave him a real "ensemble" feel for the drums as an accompanying instrument.
 

J-Boogie

Gold Member
His parts fit those TP songs so well. Like a nicely worked-in pair of jeans. He is so integral to all of those hits.

I think that his maturity as a musician can at least be partly explained by the fact that drums were somewhat of an afterthought for him. His early interests revolved around guitar/piano which gave him a real "ensemble" feel for the drums as an accompanying instrument.
Very interesting Hewitt2, for me that sheds a little light on why he is so amazing and in the pocket on those tunes.
 
Yeah. Jimmy Iovine is a heck of a producer, and clearly a very smart guy, but boy howdy was he wrong about Stan.

However, I suspect his problem — despite what he and others have said — was less with Stan's actual drumming (which, to be fair, even Lynch admits could be uneven) and more with how opinionated Stan could be. And don't get me wrong: I love Stan's drumming and think he was an absolutely integral part of what made the first decade of Tom Petty's recordings great. But I can also understand how, at a certain point, it could be difficult or even impossible to continue to work with someone against whom you're always butting heads.

I'm sure that having the Petty royalties--not to mention the Don Henley royalties--helped him move on considerably easier, and good for him.
 

J-Boogie

Gold Member
I’m still sorta annoyed about TP and JI anti drums thing lol. Take Stan off those records, release them drumless, and good luck having the same success. Didn’t JI basically create Stans drum sound by assigning him the gear he used, for that fat fabulous drum sound? A million miles away huh? Seems to me ur opinion is about a million miles off. Sorry, gotta stick up for my drum brothers and sisters! 😁
 
I’m still sorta annoyed about TP and JI anti drums thing lol. Take Stan off those records, release them drumless, and good luck having the same success. Didn’t JI basically create Stans drum sound by assigning him the gear he used, for that fat fabulous drum sound? A million miles away huh? Seems to me ur opinion is about a million miles off. Sorry, gotta stick up for my drum brothers and sisters! 😁
...is this in reference to something someone on this thread has said?
 

opentune

Platinum Member
The role of Iovine in the TP evolution tends to be overstated. He only came along in 1979. Sure Torpedoes is an important album that cracked it wide open for the 80's, but there is quite a bit of nice groundwork before that. Take the first album ....American Girl, Wild One, Breakdown....no Iovine. And regarding Iovine assigning Stan's gear for his drum sound, that scene in the Bogdanovich movie must be played up. Stan used an old Gretsch kit on the first Petty record (produced by Denny Cordell, no slouch), and it sounds just fine to me.
The band was never the same without SL, no disservice to Steve Ferrone. But people evolve and diverge.
Stan's parts are tricky and very fun to learn and play.
 

J-Boogie

Gold Member
...is this in reference to something someone on this thread has said?
The million miles away? That was from an old Modern Drummer, Stan interview when he was talking about the producer/engineer and TP always threatening to do without drums. Stan had said that JI (I believe it was Jimmy) had a saying "thats a million miles away" when he was basically blowing you off because your little request or comment is a million miles away from what he was focused on then, not important, I suppose. Can't remember what I had for breakfast, but I can remember Modern Drummer articles I read on the can 15 years ago lol
 
My favorite rock critic of this decade—the outstanding Steven Hyden—has a new piece out, listing his 100 favorite Tom Petty songs. And time and again in the writeups he sings the praises of Stan Lynch.

The most confounding common thread in Tom Petty books and documentaries pertains to Stan Lynch’s drumming. Producer Jimmy Iovine — who oversaw Damn The Torpedoes, Hard Promises, and Long After Dark before making a billion dollars from selling headphones — hated Lynch’s timekeeping, even convincing Petty to briefly fire Lynch (or compel him to quit, depending on who’s telling the story) during the Torpedeos sessions. But … Lynch is actually pretty great? (Every musician who loves Tom Petty I’ve ever met prefers Lynch to his successor, Steve Ferrone.) This groove-centric track from Hard Promises is a perfect rebuttal to Lynch critics. Yes, Lynch could apparently be a huge pain in the ass. But as a drummer, he makes the rounds!
 
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