Stage setup for drums and vocalists

moxman

Silver Member
In a recent thread there was a discussion about where drums should sit on the stage. One thing that was missed is that lead singers always want to hog the center of the stage.. because we all know the world revolves around lead singers Lol. The other thing I've noticed is that in a lot of venues, the drum kit spot or riser is often directly behind the lead singer in center stage. The problem is - the drums directly behind the lead vocalist is the worst spot for sound production.. the drums cymbals and kick feed directly into the singers mic and monitor and muddies the sound.. and makes it difficult for sound techs to tweak things to compensate.
SO.. if you have the option, set your kit up offset to the side of the singer.. so you get out of that zone - also this lets you see the audience and the audience see you - which is a better experience all round for everyone.
... and don't let guitarists put amps in front of your kick, or stools, or anything else that blocks your sound and view from the audience!
 

jda

Silver Member
when I first saw this live- Pat Metheny Group Imaginary Day tour- Paul Wertico off-to the side. Liked it.


had Railroad Crossing signs on stage..
it's more-like or add's theater.. with actors-on stage
Jazz Actors Fusion Jazz actors

here it is


in Daylight
Paiste shirt and all
his famous two huge flats left and right set up

that was Peak times then.
 
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moxman

Silver Member
Yes I saw a few of his shows like that too.. kind of cool! Also Joey Barron set up like that Yoshi's in SF once.. way off to the right side of the stage - sideways to the audience. I've heard it can be tricky getting the right stage mix so the people at stage left can hear well.. but it can all work depending on your sound tech.. as long as you are not inline in the center - behind the lead vocalist! :)
 
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Spreggy

Silver Member
In a recent thread there was a discussion about where drums should sit on the stage. One thing that was missed is that lead singers always want to hog the center of the stage.. because we all know the world revolves around lead singers Lol. The other thing I've noticed is that in a lot of venues, the drum kit spot or riser is often directly behind the lead singer in center stage. The problem is - the drums directly behind the lead vocalist is the worst spot for sound production.. the drums cymbals and kick feed directly into the singers mic and monitor and muddies the sound.. and makes it difficult for sound techs to tweak things to compensate.
SO.. if you have the option, set your kit up offset to the side of the singer.. so you get out of that zone - also this lets you see the audience and the audience see you - which is a better experience all round for everyone.
... and don't let guitarists put amps in front of your kick, or stools, or anything else that blocks your sound and view from the audience!
Thank you!! That's the jam band phenomenon influence right there.
My favorite setup is with drums and keys bookending the band, with everyone else inside within eye shot of each other.
 

JimmyM

Platinum Member
Couldn’t care less because everybody has to be somewhere. And on a stage where everyone sings, which is most of my bands, someone’s picking up drum bleed.
 

Ryan Culberson

Well-known Member
For the last year and a half or so, I’ve been setting up stage left, facing in towards the rest of the band. Made sense to me to get my drums out of the vocal mic and it also allows me great sight lines for communicating with the rest of the band. It’s also kinda cool for the audience to get to see what I’m doing without drums blocking the view. If I’m doing the duo thing, I’m still on the left side but we bring everything closer to center.

26E1CD60-497C-4F3C-8A55-2D59EDD4F297.jpeg
 

Spreggy

Silver Member
For the last year and a half or so, I’ve been setting up stage left, facing in towards the rest of the band. Made sense to me to get my drums out of the vocal mic and it also allows me great sight lines for communicating with the rest of the band. It’s also kinda cool for the audience to get to see what I’m doing without drums blocking the view. If I’m doing the duo thing, I’m still on the left side but we bring everything closer to center.

View attachment 124430

I agree, it's a stage-presence win if the crowd can see all a drummer is doing.
 

Tony_H

Active Member
I like being hidden in the back...LOL

Up until recently, we didn't have any dedicated stage lighting on me and I was very comfy with that. Then the rest of the band decided they wanted me to have lights and I just move cymbals around to obscure the view now...haha

But, our lead singer does set up either off center, or if there is enough stage room, far enough forward where her mic doesn't pick up anything noticeable. I do have to remind her to shut the mic off when she comes back and dances near the drums during guitar solos though ;)
 
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