Stack vs. fixed hats?

Mastiff

Senior Member
Since I started messing with double bass, I've been trying to figure out what to do for a non-ride-cymbal hi-hat replacement. I have a drop clutch, but I'm not a big fan. It looks like other options are a second set of fixed hats, or else a stack. Any opinions? Regarding the stack, from what I can tell, some people use them as more of a "trash crash" and less for continuous time keeping. Are there certain ones that work better one way or the other? My other cymbals are Meinl Byzance Sand series. There doesn't appear to be any stack in the Byzance line at all from what I can tell.
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
Fixed hats ..... or aux. hats ..... are an excellent option for "another" voice before the ride. I ran two hats (reg. and aux.) for quite some time, when I was in a hard rock band. My regular hats were Paiste 2002 ..... my aux. hats were more aggressive sounding Sabians. I think the stack kind-of evolved from the aux. hat thing. I saw lots of drummers using two hats waaaay before I ever saw anyone using stacks.

Of course, depending on what cymbals you stack, you can get as sweet or as rude as you want. I have a Sabian 10" Chopper that works very well in lieu of aux. hats .....

Since you're into Meinl, here's a pretty good comparison of their artist stacks .....
 
I've never actually played with a stack but would love to, so I really dig that video. I like them all but think the Luke Holland appeals to me most, but that arrangement sure seems like you're going to crack the bottom cymbal before too long. I haven't heard about that happening often with stacks, so maybe not?
 

Pass.of.E.r.a.

Gold Member
Wowie. That's a lot for a stack!

One of the best stacks I ever remember hearing live (as well as in this video) was Jojo Mayer's stack. It's a 13" Fierce top (unlathed, super hammered) over a 14" china. It always sounded like more than a one-trick-pony like most stacks seem to be, but a large part of that is probably Mayer's playing.

-Jonathan
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
I'll take 2 broken cymbals that sound decent and fit together to make my own stacks. Been doing it before they sold them as packs lol. They do sound good, but damn, that's expensive.

Aux hats or x-hats or whatever you want to call them are good. That way you can have a closed set on the kit. I've seen guys with one fully closed, one kinda sloshy, AND their main hats. You can get adapters that allow you to mount on top of another cymbal to save room too.

I had some remote hats even at one point but it's just way to much to carry and set up for myself.
 

Row

Junior Member
I use closed hats with a 10 inch splash on top which adds more of a trashy bite when closed, and can get a few different sounds when played on the edge of the hat or on the splash.
 
I'll take 2 broken cymbals that sound decent and fit together to make my own stacks. Been doing it before they sold them as packs lol. They do sound good, but damn, that's expensive.

Aux hats or x-hats or whatever you want to call them are good. That way you can have a closed set on the kit. I've seen guys with one fully closed, one kinda sloshy, AND their main hats. You can get adapters that allow you to mount on top of another cymbal to save room too.

I had some remote hats even at one point but it's just way to much to carry and set up for myself.
Yep. Long before it was a thing , when I was 16-17 in 1982 or 83, I started playing around with all my broken ( crappy) cymbals making stacks( as were other drummers). I always had one or two set up with the kit . When drummer friends of my guitarist brother who was older than me by 3 years would stop by to jam , they’d always ask ....”what’s this” with a raised eyebrow, until the played them . Then it was...... “this is cool, can I borrow it?”. Lol ! There were splash stacks , splash over china stacks , large stacks , small stacks , you name it ...... I tried it . Loved experimenting with cymbal sounds. Some were epic failures , but some were great and sounded better that stacks going for big money today🤷🏻‍♂️🙄. In fact I don’t know or did I ever research the history of the stack or where it started or who came up with it but I’m guessing it originated from the same innocent experimentation with cymbals . I think of them as a first cousin to my hats more than related to crashes I guess , if that makes sense🤷🏻‍♂️

Oh, ..... getting back to the question ..... why not both 🤷🏻‍♂️
 
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beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
Yep. Long before it was a thing , when I was 16-17 in 1982 or 83, I started playing around with all my broken ( crappy) cymbals making stacks( as were other drummers). I always had one or two set up with the kit . When drummer friends of my guitarist brother who was older than me by 3 years would stop by to jam , they’d always ask ....”what’s this” with a raised eyebrow, until the played them . Then it was...... “this is cool, can I borrow it?”. Lol ! There were splash stacks , splash over china stacks , large stacks , small stacks , you name it ...... I tried it . Loved experimenting with cymbal sounds. Some were epic failures , but some were great and sounded better that stacks going for big money today🤷🏻‍♂️🙄. In fact I don’t know or did I ever research the history of the stack or where it started or who came up with it but I’m guessing it originated from the same innocent experimentation with cymbals . I think of them as a first cousin to my hats more than related to crashes I guess , if that makes sense🤷🏻‍♂️

Oh, ..... getting back to the question ..... why not both 🤷🏻‍♂️
I have defiantly made a few triple stacks, splash stacks, and some weird ones that did NOT work out. The nice thing about the companies making them is they basically research them, get artist input, find cymbals that FIT together properly and design them with purpose. Not that I didn't have a few winning combos making my own.
 
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