Sport Injuries That Stop You Drumming?

Galadrm

Senior Member
Hey all just wondering how many of you have suffered injuries that have stopped you from playing drums, for a short period, but mostly longer period. Eg not just a broken bone, but a serious recurring nerve or joint issue.

I play football (soccer) and this season have constantly had different injuries, almost not walking away from a game without something. Luckily I heal fast and I my injuries normally don't stick around, it is always something different. Today I badly strained a ligament or tendon that runs down the back of the leg across the back of the knee on the inner side. It feels very troublesome and puts me in a lot of pain to hold my foot off the as if I was playing a kick drum.

Anyway I was just wondering if some of you guys could give me some insight into what types of leg injuries you have or could get that would put your drumming at risk? And what is the chance of receiving one of these injuries playing football/soccer? Just wondering if I should reassess my sporting habits if they will impact on my drumming career.
 

Boomka

Platinum Member
Anyway I was just wondering if some of you guys could give me some insight into what types of leg injuries you have or could get that would put your drumming at risk?
Presumably anything that prevents you playing drums comfortably and to the best of your abilities. I mean, there's probably thousands of conditions that could detrimentally effect your playing. This is a question for a doc, not a bunch of random drummists on a web forum.

And what is the chance of receiving one of these injuries playing football/soccer? Just wondering if I should reassess my sporting habits if they will impact on my drumming career.
I think that's a question for an orthopedic surgeon who sees a lot of injuries or, better yet, a statistician who compiles data on sports injuries. Our personal tales of tennis elbow or sprained ankles aren't really what you're asking for.

But, here's mine anyway. I quit playing hockey because when 15 year old boys play, it's largely just a competition to see who can hurt each other the most. I figured I wasn't going to be a pro athlete, and the girls who were into musicians were way cooler than the puck bunnies so I ditched my skates. Though, I did continue to play soccer right up to men's league because I felt the risk of catastrophic injury was acceptable. Then I smashed my orbital and cheekbone in 7 places and suffered a serious concussion in my final season. Then again, chicks dig scars so it fit into the whole thing I was working.

Anyway, you have to come to your own decision about what you want out of life. At 40 I still lift heavy weights frequently and do other physical activity that can lead to all sorts of injuries. A life without some risk is a waste, IMO. But we each have to come to our own conclusions about how much, and what kind of, risk we're willing to accept. It's a very personal decision.
 
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Galadrm

Senior Member
Thanks for the reply. I guess what Im asking about is fairly specific and at the same time there are many different answers. I was at the same time looking to gather more of a statistic on peoples personal experiences. I think how you said a life without some risk is a waste, I completely agree on this point and it makes me much more determined to do everything I can to avoid injury and continue playing.

I guess 99% of injuries these days would have very good recovery rates, and as in your case you mentioned you are still involved in physical activity. Anyway thanks for sharing you have given me a couple of things to think about.
 

No Me Metro

Member
I'm in my late 30s. I've exercised my entire life and played various sports. Most recently, I used to play soccer and practice Brazilian jiu jitsu (BJJ).

Then, I tore my meniscus (knee) playing soccer, which required surgery. BJJ was great but led to knee, neck and back fatigue injuries.

I continue to exercise regularly to maintain fitness- light weight, high repetitions- but my days of friendly competition in sports are over because I do not like spending most of my time in recovery mode.

If your knee hurts or is swollen for more than a few days, go see an orthopedic surgeon. If you continue to walk on an injured knee you will exacerbate any damage that may have already occurred. Do whatever physical therapy exercises that are recommended.

By the way, I got into drumming because I wanted a hobby that would not cause any more injuries. So far so good. :)
 

calan

Silver Member
I don't have any sports injuries, but I did my break my ankle in my tibia and fibula nearly ten years ago. With the hardware that's in there now, and the way the musculature has healed, it's never felt quite right since.

I used to be able to go out and run a mile or two. If I do that now, that ankle hurts for several days afterwards. I suppose it always hurts to some degree, but it's minor enough that it's not troublesome. It's also adversely affected my double bass and hi hat work. Just don't have the quickness or stamina. I've worked at it, but it's difficult and frustrating because it seems I can only really get so far no matter what.

So I would recommend not doing that. I would think playing the footie increases the risk of ankle injuries.

Other than that, it's just minor things from time to time. I had some cracked ribs a couple of years back that stopped me for a few weeks. Currently I'm limited due to a fairly severe rope burn on one of my hands.
 

Stefan Brodsky

Senior Member
Had an right inguinal hernia a few years back which kept me from the kit, until it could be repaired. Ditto for some right foot surgery, which followed a serious staff infection. More recently however, while weightlifting, I strained a deltoid muscle in my left shoulder, which was further exacerbated by lifting my bicycle overhead and pulling some weeds in the garden. This impinged the way I could get around the drums. It became that sore, that I had trouble sleeping and really had doubts whether I could play a scheduled major outdoor gig. But thanks to some hi-tech sports tape and ibuprofen, I got thru it, keeping things simple, e.g. keeping my snare a bit closer to me, lowering my high hat and cymbals just a smidge, and using lighter sticks. My cymbals and high hat are fairly low to begin with, and I'm a big fan of the Vater 5A Sugar Maples, which are fairly light for their size. I suspect I am going to need some PT on this injury, however. Such was the case earlier this year, when I sprained a meniscus in my left knee which also needed physical therapy, and which would often act up, after 2+ hours at a gig. I'm not a spring chicken anymore, despite my thoughts to think otherwise.
 
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incrementalg

Gold Member
I broke my back in a downhill mountain biking accident. I was sidelined from playing for a couple of months. Had to change my throne to one with a back support. The biggest problem I have isn't with playing but with moving gear around these days. I don't gig anymore so schlepping bass drums and stands isn't an issue right now.
 

Galadrm

Senior Member
More recently however, while weightlifting, I strained a deltoid muscle in my left shoulder
Thanks for sharing everyone! Just makes you realise there is risk in almost every kind of activity. I also lift weights so thanks for making me aware of possible injury from this. I don't go absolutely crazy with them though so I wouldn't say I am at too much risk and I always warm up my arms first and start with light weights. It amazes me how many people just hit the hard weights as soon as they rock up at the gym, much easier to do some damage.
 

RandyParker

Junior Member
I'm in my late 30s. I've exercised my entire life and played various sports. Most recently, I used to play soccer and practice Brazilian jiu jitsu (BJJ).

Then, I tore my meniscus (knee) playing soccer, which required surgery. BJJ was great but led to knee, neck and back fatigue injuries.

I continue to exercise regularly to maintain fitness- light weight, high repetitions- but my days of friendly competition in sports are over because I do not like spending most of my time in recovery mode.

If your knee hurts or is swollen for more than a few days, go see an orthopedic surgeon. If you continue to walk on an injured knee you will exacerbate any damage that may have already occurred. Do whatever physical therapy exercises that are recommended.

By the way, I got into drumming because I wanted a hobby that would not cause any more injuries. So far so good. :)
No Me Metro, how are you now?
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
I was conducting a concert band in a school concert and tweaked my neck somehow - had tingling pain in my left arm for some weeks/months. Hitting the snare was quite uncomfortable, and I could barley raise my left arm for fills, etc.

Anyway, after some X-Rays and Chiropractic adjustments, the rubbing nerve in my upper spine was cleared, and now I'm fine again.

Almost any activity can be the last straw that triggers a mild injury. Mine was waving a baton around and pointing at a large band, not a sport, martial arts or anything high impact.
 

Destroyer772

Gold Member
I was working out doing squat's and ripped my meniscus in my knee, had to have surgery to get it removed. Had me down for around 3 month's, and 2 more before i could play right again.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
I tore every muscle across my collar bone road biking when I was 18 after the chain snapped and threw me over the handlebars. Went for x-rays and looking back I wish I'd have broke my collar bone because I'd have got morphine and other assorted pain relief. Sleeping on my back for 3 weeks and shoulder spasms when the muscle grows back is all kinds of nice :)

That gave me grief for about 3 years.

Touch wood I play cricket and lift weights a lot but I've avoided serious injury, mind you if you've ever had a cricket ball off your inner thigh whilst batting and had your snare drum catch the bruise over the next two weeks it makes you yelp a bit! (I think only the English or the Aussies will understand that one!)
 

Zero Mercury Drummer

Senior Member
I have two passions- drumming and motocross. I broke my hip on the mx bike and eventually had a full hip replacement in my early 40s.
I found drumming helps in recovery. My ruined hip definitely affected my ability to use the hi-hat with my foot- the lifting and dropping motion just wasn't happening. But it helped me rehabilitate.
In general I found drumming helped my sports and vice versa. Anything that keeps you active and your blood pumping is good.
I wouldn't restrict sports for the sake of drumming. Unless you really pulverize yourself you should be able play drums all you want. And I've had too many injuries from motocross to list here.
 
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