Speed cobra drive shaft wear - not terribly pleased

PQleyR

Platinum Member
I've been finding the slave pedal on my Tama Speed Cobras was requiring more and more spring tension to feel even remotely similar to the master pedal, but even then the feel was staggeringly different between the two.

I think I've found the source of the problem:



The universal joint has keyholed, meaning that there's 1mm of play in the up/down arc of the left/right joint, which translates to 3-4cm of beater movement independent of the pedal. The response is awful, and the sweet spot much further forward on the left pedal than the right as a consequence. No adjustment will fix this.

It's just unfortunate that I found this out now when I have to leave for Australia on Thursday morning...! I've only had these pedals since March 2012 and it seems an extraordinary amount of wear for that amount of time.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Just a thought with no scientific basis. Reverse the shaft so the the left end is now on the right. You will be working against the keyhole. Try this until you an get the shaft replaced.
 

PQleyR

Platinum Member
Trick make a generic zero latency shaft - buy that.
Doesn't look like it's available in the UK at the moment. To be honest, I have been getting a bit tired of the Speed Cobras for a variety of reasons, so I'm considering switching to different pedals.
 

PQleyR

Platinum Member
Thomann.de has it for €205! To paraphrase Luke Skywalker, I could almost buy a new pedal for that!
 

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
If you're really struggling Ben, I could lend you my old Pearl P-100 but I doubt it's up to your standards. I'll have to check it's complete.

I am assuming you're currently in Surrey - which I realise is perhaps a wild assumption, too!
 

PQleyR

Platinum Member
Oh, thanks Duncan, I really appreciate that (I actually had a P-102 or whatever the double is called before these Speed Cobras), but I'm going to be able to borrow some DW9000s over there, which will plainly be good enough. It's just about having to learn to play new pedals more than anything. After these difficulties though, the DWs will almost certainly be a great improvement all round.
 

Scottie15

Senior Member
Oh, thanks Duncan, I really appreciate that (I actually had a P-102 or whatever the double is called before these Speed Cobras), but I'm going to be able to borrow some DW9000s over there, which will plainly be good enough. It's just about having to learn to play new pedals more than anything. After these difficulties though, the DWs will almost certainly be a great improvement all round.
Wierd. I have been a huge fan of my cobras. I did have issues with play in the slave beater-holder cam area, but never with the driveshaft. In fact, the drive shaft worked perfectly and slave lag was minimal. I did, however, buy the Trick drive shaft anyways and I enjoy it. Just curious, what else bugs you about the pedal?
 
D

drumming sort of person

Guest
I've only had these pedals since March 2012 and it seems an extraordinary amount of wear for that amount of time.
Not really. Not if you use them regularly, and don't put any lubricant in there. Especially if you have them set up at any sort of acute angle. Two years is not too bad.
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
Good luck over there, it's full of Australians!
No mate, it's full of bloody Poms.............and Kiwis!!


Sounds like you're sorted Ben, but if you find when you get to Melbourne you're still struggling for something under your feet, I can hook you up with either Demon Drive pedals or just the Z-link drive shaft. Use 'em for the tour if need be.
 

PQleyR

Platinum Member
Wierd. I have been a huge fan of my cobras. I did have issues with play in the slave beater-holder cam area, but never with the driveshaft. In fact, the drive shaft worked perfectly and slave lag was minimal. I did, however, buy the Trick drive shaft anyways and I enjoy it. Just curious, what else bugs you about the pedal?
I find that because of the length of the footboards, when I set up the beater angle and spring tension that I want, the beater hits me in the top of the foot! And it's got that sharp metal bit that cuts you if you've got no shoes on. Also, I just find myself having to put pressure on the pedal in an awkward way in order to get good consistent single strokes. I think I need a more traditional style of pedal.

No mate, it's full of bloody Poms.............and Kiwis!!


Sounds like you're sorted Ben, but if you find when you get to Melbourne you're still struggling for something under your feet, I can hook you up with either Demon Drive pedals or just the Z-link drive shaft. Use 'em for the tour if need be.
I am touched by everyone's generosity here! Thank you all so much!
That might be a bit awkward since we're finishing in Brisbane so I wouldn't be able to get stuff back to you that easily. Thank you though.

Not really. Not if you use them regularly, and don't put any lubricant in there. Especially if you have them set up at any sort of acute angle. Two years is not too bad.
It's been lubricated from time to time...do you really think it's acceptable for a top-of-the-line pedal from a major manufacturer to last two years, if that, before needing components replacing? Bear in mind that I only just discovered the problem, I'd been experiencing difficulties for some time but hadn't isolated the cause.

I went to a local music shop and asked their drum department about this, and they expressed surprise at the problem I'd encountered and said nobody had returned any pedals to them, so it doesn't sound like it's something that occurs all the time.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I went to a local music shop and asked their drum department about this, and they expressed surprise at the problem I'd encountered and said nobody had returned any pedals to them, so it doesn't sound like it's something that occurs all the time.
It definitely happens. I think it is more common amongst us metal guys than anyone though. We run our feet more than most, and the driveshaft is the weak link in pedal design. Pearl and Trick seem to have rectified the situation with their redesigned shaft.
 

PQleyR

Platinum Member
It definitely happens. I think it is more common amongst us metal guys than anyone though. We run our feet more than most, and the driveshaft is the weak link in pedal design. Pearl and Trick seem to have rectified the situation with their redesigned shaft.
Maybe I'll have to get one of those either way then.

I know it does happen, but I was just querying the idea that this is something that's not only common but something you should expect to happen so quickly. I had a pair of Pearl P-102s previously that lasted much longer (I used them as a double pedal for about five years) hence my dismay. With those, the universal joint just fell apart one day.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I know it does happen, but I was just querying the idea that this is something that's not only common but something you should expect to happen so quickly. I had a pair of Pearl P-102s previously that lasted much longer (I used them as a double pedal for about five years) hence my dismay. With those, the universal joint just fell apart one day.
I have always felt that drum companies would extend the life of the driveshaft if they would simply add a spring to the slave pedal. That way the spring returns the slave pedal to its up position. The spring on the main side of the driveshaft would still return the beater, and the driveshaft is just along for the ride. Without that extra spring, the driveshaft is responsible for returning the slave to the up position, and I would be willing to bet that this is a big part of driveshaft wear.

My Pearl 902's are still hanging in there. I bought it used though, so I don't know how much use the slave really got before me. I've had it about 7 months now.
 

Reggae_Mangle

Silver Member
I have always felt that drum companies would extend the life of the driveshaft if they would simply add a spring to the slave pedal. That way the spring returns the slave pedal to its up position. The spring on the main side of the driveshaft would still return the beater, and the driveshaft is just along for the ride. Without that extra spring, the driveshaft is responsible for returning the slave to the up position, and I would be willing to bet that this is a big part of driveshaft wear.

My Pearl 902's are still hanging in there. I bought it used though, so I don't know how much use the slave really got before me. I've had it about 7 months now.
I guess this might differ from pedal to pedal. On my Trick Dominators, there are springs on both the master and slave pedals, due to their ability to be split into single pedals. I think the Axis pedals are the same way.

Surprised to see that kind of damage to a driveshaft. Could it have occurred during transport? That kind of keyholing is likely to have occurred due to excessive stress, probably not during the course of playing.
 

Duck Tape

Platinum Member
Thomann.de has it for €205! To paraphrase Luke Skywalker, I could almost buy a new pedal for that!
Unless you're getting the dw, you could use the upgraded shaft for your next pedal. But if you're looking, I do recommend dw pedals, I think mine is great.

My tama driveshaft wore out too.
 
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