Sound Proofing my shed

gbftats

Member
I have a wooden shed Id like to turn into a practice room. It doesnt need to be totally sound proof, but simply knock the sound down so the neighbors cant hear it. Any help on this project would be great.

Right now it has ply wood on the outside of the 2x4 studs. I was thinking i would start by filling the studs with insulation then sheet rock. Off the sheet rock i figured i would then put some channeled aluminum strips up. with some sort of rubber gasket between the metal and sheetrock. Then one more layer of sheet rock to make "a room in a room". Seal up the door, and do something similar in the rafters.

To anyone with experience, will this greatly reduce the noise from the drum kit and loud amps?
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
If you do a search, there are numerous threads on this topic.

As I aways say:

Before you do anything, buy this book:
KEEP THE PEACE! THE MUSICIAN'S GUIDE TO SOUNDPROOFING by Mark Parsons, which is straightforward, and also written geared to drummers.

If you want to get more in depth, find this book:
Home Recording Studio: Build it Like the Pros by Rod Gervais
It's long, lots of technical jargon, and some of it will go over your head, but it's full of good info.

Your basic plan is on to the right idea. It depends, of course, on how close your nearest neighbor is and how much you need to reduce the noise. You really need careful planning, and to think everything through. If you cut one little corner, or leave something out, it can easily undo the effectives of the rest your work.
 

Aeolian

Platinum Member
It's just about impossible to make it so that neighbors (in a tract community) cannot hear drums being played in a "shed". The best you can hope for is to make it like someone is running a stereo in there and hope that's okay with the neighbors. You would have to nearly build a bomb shelter to make it so that they can't hear it at all. The sound isolation data is available for concrete and cinderblock walls on the web. Look up Sharpe et. al. and you can bury yourself in the calculus involved.

The short answer to finishing the interior of a shed to get a reasonable degree of isolation that people shouldn't complain is to mount Whisper Clips to the studs http://www.soundisolationstore.com/whisperclip.html with hat channel and two layers of 5/8 type X fireproof drywall on the walls and ceiling. For a 100 square foot shed, that works out to nearly a grand. This assumes you are on a concrete slab. And that you carefully seal any gaps in the construction and have a very solid door. You could add to this by putting Green Glue in-between the layers of drywall for another $250, which will give a slight additional reduction in the amount of kick drum your neighbors hear. Which is what they are most likely to hear and complain about.

This is for the sound isolation so it doesn't cause the neighbors to complain. Then you want to dampen the sound inside with various room treatments so that it sounds good to you inside the room.

If you think you can figure out something more clever (ne: less expensive), read Gervais' book or get on studio building forums like Gearslutz and see how many of those clever ideas worked out in reality.

I'm in the middle of building a purpose built "shed" in my backyard for specifically this reason. As an engineer by day, I looked into what was involved vs. non-technical "recommendations" like egg cartons on the wall.
 

Mosschops

Junior Member
Correct sizing in M2 or M3 would be the best way to address this when considering bulking materials to an already built project.

One thing I would strongly advise against is with stand alone timber builds is filling the first cavity with loose insulation no matter who's book or advice you take. You must always have a gap between the outer timber and the first internal layer of any build for transpiration and condensation otherwise you'll be dogged with your quality sound proofing layers being damp or at the least stained by mould.
Many people do not understand the reason why traditional houses are built with a cavity but it is for the condensation to run down the inside of the outer wall and into your foundations, and not as an insulator as most people think.

Whatever you're advised or read you'd be a wise man to leave a cavity on the outside skin.

Edit: This is why some old English preserved buildings are called 'Blackhouse Quay' or as a pub 'The Black House Tavern'. Before cavity walls buildings were painted with tar to prevent the inner single wall builds from running with condensation from the inner-outer temperature difference.
 
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Aeolian

Platinum Member
I'm not sure R13 or R19 fibreglass insulation would block condensation on the interior side of the outer siding from running down the surface. Modern US building code requires R13 insulation in 2x4 timber framed houses regardless of the siding material. One other way proper sound isolation practices runs afoul of building code is by leaving the entire cavity in the wall open from top to bottom. Code requires a fire block to limit the wonderful chimney made by an 8 foot high cavity that is 15" x 3 1/2. Some builders put the typical fire block cross pieces into the framing and then use relatively fireproof rock wool inbetween that and the floating wall. At a minimum, you should have the ceiling sheetrock overlaping the top of the wall so that there isn't a complete chimney all the way up the wall and around the ceiling.

One thing I do agree with is that you don't want to pack the insulation in tightly. Putting R19 into 2x4 walls doesn't improve the sound isolation. You would only use it on 2x6 framing or offset 2x4 studs on 6" footer/headers. From a sound isolation standpoint, you want to damp the transmission of sound radiation from your (isolated on clips and hat channel) inside wall before it reaches the outside wall. This is done with multiple seperate airspaces. As in the loosely packed fibreglass. The more effectively you couple the two walls to each other by some physical connection (like tightly packed insulation material) the more noise gets transmitted from inside to outside walls. With all the other ways an amateur studio designer/builder will create leakage and flanking paths, fancier walls are mostly a waste of time and money.
 

gbftats

Member
Thanks for the great advice, i will definently get that book. Also the closest neighbor is probably 50 yard or so.
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
I have a wooden shed Id like to turn into a practice room. It doesnt need to be totally sound proof, but simply knock the sound down so the neighbors cant hear it. Any help on this project would be great.

Right now it has ply wood on the outside of the 2x4 studs. I was thinking i would start by filling the studs with insulation then sheet rock. Off the sheet rock i figured i would then put some channeled aluminum strips up. with some sort of rubber gasket between the metal and sheetrock. Then one more layer of sheet rock to make "a room in a room". Seal up the door, and do something similar in the rafters.

To anyone with experience, will this greatly reduce the noise from the drum kit and loud amps?
That sounds like a good plan. They already make these soundproofing strips to go between sheetrock layers. Do you have a window? I would suggest one, but then you would need to make an interior hinged little door to cover it, but it is nice to get natural light in.

I would recommend carpeting on the floor, acoustic tile on the ceiling and sound-absorbing wallpaper on the walls. This won't help much with keeping sound levels down but it will make the room more acoustically dead and better to practice in.


I would invest in a decent ceiling fan because the room will get stuffy with a bunch of dudes in their practicing.
 
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