Sound cancelling my attic

konaboy

Pioneer Member
I live in Scotland most of the time it's really cold so I doubt it will get really warm
temps in an attic can easily be 30* warmer than the outdoor temperature.


you really need some type of heating /cooling option to keep from ruining your gear
 

Aeolian

Platinum Member
I think he just wants something simple, not a studio quality recording booth.
Recognize that. It's the reduction in noise that gets outside or into the rest of the house that's the main sticking point. And the expensive part. If sound quality was important, then things like ratios of dimensions come into play. You most definitely would not want an 8' wide by 8' high room if you cared about the sound at all. From there you get into non-parallel surfaces that are really tricky to construct. Nobody is suggesting any of that. Just enough sound control to make the drumming tolerable.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Just enough sound control to make the drumming tolerable.
That's what I was trying to get at, tolerable.

Here is my argument (not the yelling, fists flying type, the exchanging of ideas, debatable type):

The "room in a room" idea seems to be the way to go. The idea being that his drums make noise. To leave the room, the sound must pass through a wall. The noise upon exiting that wall is reduced. No way to get around this, it will be reduced as it cannot get louder. That reduced noise must then travel through the air (getting quieter as it gets farther away) and pass through another wall, the exterior walls and roof in this case, being reduced once again. The noise must then travel through the outside air where it will join the sounds of birds, cars, sheep, and knights slaying dragons (he did say Scotland), still getting quieter as it gets farther from the source, and reach the neighbors house. It must then pass through another wall.......you see where I'm going with this.

The OP made a claim of neighbors complaining. Everyone automatically jumped on the "soundproofing is super expensive and must be done to studio conditions" bandwagon. I'm just trying to offer other suggestions and help the kid out, not discouraging him by throwing a huge dollar estimate his way. There is more than one way to skin a cat.

Soundproofing a room is a ridiculous idea anyhow. If a room were truely soundproof, when he put his drums in there they wouldn't make any sound!
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
Everyone automatically jumped on the "soundproofing is super expensive and must be done to studio conditions" bandwagon.
I don't see it that way at all. The way I figure it, the discernment between effective sound proofing and merely deadening a room was made. One is a way of eliminating sound vibrations from annoying those around you......the other not so much, yet is so commonly mistaken as being effective.

Where he takes it is up to him, I agree. But there's no point telling him that the degree of sound treatment he enquired about can be achieved ultra cheaply when it just can't. There is indeed a trade off between "sound proof" and "cheap" The advice given is prudent whether it's accepted or not.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I don't see it that way at all. The way I figure it, the discernment between effective sound proofing and merely deadening a room was made. One is a way of eliminating sound vibrations from annoying those around you......the other not so much, yet is so commonly mistaken as being effective.

Where he takes it is up to him, I agree. But there's no point telling him that the degree of sound treatment he enquired about can be achieved ultra cheaply when it just can't. There is indeed a trade off between "sound proof" and "cheap" The advice given is prudent whether it's accepted or not.
I in no way believe he can achieve his goal ultra cheaply. I can't afford to build a room, even one as basic and simple as I described. So to me, even building a room is expensive, one I would not wanna incur.

He lives in Scotland, that should be plenty far north to require a basement. Why are we still talking about an attic anyhow?
 
B

britchops

Guest
Sound proofing the attic could prove expensive and, ultimately, flawed. Do you have a cellar or garden office(!)? Much better to play drums in as the sound is naturally dampened in a cellar or away from the house/neighbours in a garden office.

Think of the neighbours!!

All the best

TJ @ www.britchops.co.uk
 

Zickos

Gold Member
You will never sound proof an attic effectively and cheaply. Your best bet is to:

A: Sound proof the drums. Use drum mufflers such as Sound Off or mesh heads.

B: Use marshmallow sticks. To make marshmallow sticks, buy wooden shush-ka-bob sticks and cover them with the small marshmallows (use the large ones if you have big hands). After they become sticky you can either brown them over an open fire or dip them in hot chocolate. Good luck and bon appitite!
 

Aeolian

Platinum Member
After the mattress pads, carpet, eggcrates, the next most common fallacy in sound reduction or attenuation (let's not call it sound proofing, it's a matter of how much reduction you can create/afford) is the barrier or more walls concept. Think of the wall in that attic shed like the reso head on your drum. You make a noise on the inside of the room which causes the wall to flex outwards. That radiates the same sound from that wall to the next, and so on. There's a degree of attenuation in each barrier (or leaf as it's referred to in sound attenuation design) but it's not much unless that leaf has some intrinsic resistance to being vibrated. Like being too massive to move easily. Or too rigid to move easily. More leafs actually improve the transmission by adding another receiving/re-radiating surface to the mix.

Simple physics will tell you that rigidity will help with low frequencies with their slow and large displacements, but considerably less at higher frequencies. Mass will be harder to move at lower frequencies until it's natural resonance is reached and then it won't help much. More mass = a lower natural frequency and improved attenuation of sounds above that. Of course there's a practical limit, and the reason I warned against putting enough weight to appreciably attenuate a kick drum on the rafters of a house. Most of which are simple trusses with tensile loads unless there's a load bearing wall with adequate footing underneath.

Some combination of stiffness and mass can be engineered to give reasonably broadband attenuation. So kick drums, snares and cymbals are all attenuated to a similar enough degree that the sound levels to others are tolerable. As a practical matter, the op isn't going to manage enough mass to keep a kick drum equal to the other drums, but that will be the limiting factor in "annoyance control". So it comes down to reasonably stiff construction and as much mass as he can safely manage on a single leaf, and as much isolation between that leaf and the next (the house) as possible.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
The OP made a claim of neighbors complaining. Everyone automatically jumped on the "soundproofing is super expensive and must be done to studio conditions" bandwagon. I'm just trying to offer other suggestions and help the kid out, not discouraging him by throwing a huge dollar estimate his way. There is more than one way to skin a cat.
I don't see it as that. I see it as a warning that much of a warning of avoiding getting your hopes up to high.

I always recommend reading the books I listed, so one can have a better understanding of what is involved to get any level of sound reduction.

My first studio I build I thoughtI knew what I was doing, and the description of materials seemed impressive, but in the end, it really didn't offer much sound reduction over just a regular room.

My 2nd build was done with much more knowledge. And a bigger budget. But I also knew from my reading that upfront the design would have certain limitations, and I was mentally prepared for inherit non-perfections.

There is much more to building a room that will give any sonic reductions then can easily be explained on a forum.

So I always say read more! Or else you may end up pouring money into something that useless in reducing noise to the neighbors.
 
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