Sonor SQ2 Drum Configuration.

As i going to configure my new Sonor drum kit SQ2 I will need help designing things and choosing the best options possible to get best value out of this Sonor SQ2 drum kit.

First Question:
Which shell material is the best option out of all theses four options.

Beech
Birch
Maple
X-Ray Acrylic
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
It's gonna be like the other thread man, It's personal preference.

We can have opinions, but that's all they'll be, if you talk a bit about what yo'll be using them for and what music and drummers you like.

For me, all I can do is say what I held back in that other thread. You should probably get a bit more hands on experience before you spend that much money. Make sure what you want and why.

It's like what's better? A strat, a tele or a Les Paul? Sure they all have characteristics some of relate to stylres and players we know that pla those styles, but it's 99% personal taste. Studio players have those options to replicate, but name artists don't care about that stuff. They're just trying to be themselves.
 
It's gonna be like the other thread man, It's personal preference.

We can have opinions, but that's all they'll be, if you talk a bit about what yo'll be using them for and what music and drummers you like.

For me, all I can do is say what I held back in that other thread. You should probably get a bit more hands on experience before you spend that much money. Make sure what you want and why.

It's like what's better? A strat, a tele or a Les Paul? Sure they all have characteristics some of relate to stylres and players we know that pla those styles, but it's 99% personal taste. Studio players have those options to replicate, but name artists don't care about that stuff. They're just trying to be themselves.
As mention previously, I am using this to record for my music and clients.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Your best option out of all the 4 choices is the option that you know you want, because you understand each option and know what they sound like. It would pay you to get real world experience with whatever you are considering buying. Listen to us, but act on your own opinions, not ours. You simply have to form your own opinions by visiting music stores to figure out your personal preferences. I definitely have my own opinions, you definitely should have your own opinions too.

Drums are like sex partners. Only you know what turns you on. We can't pick girls for you, that's your job. You have to form your own opinions based on your own personal experience, not what you read somewhere. Have you heard maple drums? Birch? beech? Acrylic? Do you have any preferences? If so, there's your answer.

To attempt to answer your questions, maple is the traditional standard reference point. Birch is a little brighter. Beech I can't speak intelligently about as I never owned a beech kit. I'm pretty sure I understand it is a middle of the road wood, not too dark, not real bright, but don't quote me on that. The acrylic kits...I liked the sound of the Spaun acrylic kit I had. Again, sort of in the middle. Bubinga, mahogany, walnut are all darker sounding woods.

Truth be told, any of those drums would fit your bill. It's not really the drums, it's the skill of the person trying to get the sound out of those drums that's the real deciding factor. You can take Joe Blow terrible tuner and give him the best set in the world and yes he will still manage to make them sound like crap. Conversely you can take Joe Blow awesome tuner and he can make a budget kit sound like a million bucks.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
I couldn't tell you how many tims I've made a crappy "unsavable" kit sound decent.

It starts with removing about 10 lbs of tape and actually try tuning it. :rolleyes:


Anyway.

The reason this is ahard Isheee is that there are so many options and the design options for an SQ2, which you can have pretty much any way you want geerally wrrants that you understand how these various traditional ways of construction influence the sound. Sonor will have their own slight or not so slight charactern that makes them different from others.

Your question in the other thread is to open. All you will get is our personal tastes, tips on saving some money and names of some traditionally nice recording kits.

If you were a player starting out, which I held off because it wasn't clear, the general advice would be to save on the kit and spend money on lessons. There is no definitive answer and there is no best. That's why options exist.

You know too little and we don't get enough parameters or information to go on.

If you want to know about wood, about shell thickness or construction, you have to at least give some kind of hint about what sound, response, character etc... you want from a drum.

If you truly want some in sight on Sonor drums from a top player, you have an amazing resource right here on the forum. https://www.drummerworld.com/forums/index.php?threads/gavin-harrison-here.698/
 

markdrumz

Junior Member
If you find yourself going towards the maple then you might consider picking up one of the "blowout" Sonor Prolite kits available. Sonor's parent company had a fire sale to dealers on the Prolites a while back--they had said they weren't going to sell them in the US anymore. Surpirse--looks like they are back in 2019 with some new finishes! If this is for a studio, the Chocolate Burl finish is really attractive and will give off a high-end look. If you poke around you can find these kits for under $3k, new. PM me if you want to know more.
 

RickP

Gold Member
My personal preference for Sonor Drum shell material is Beech . I have a Sonor Vintage Series kit with thin Beech shells and round over edges . It is drier than most maple kits with more of a spread of tone across the low medium and high frequencies . I have played an SQ2 with the vintage maple shells and they are excellent as well . Very resonant and deep sounding .

For an SQ2 for versatility sake , I would go Medium Beech shells across the entire kit . It would give you a nice blend of tone and attack . Besides Sonor is famous for their Beech Shells .
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
Maple all the way. A maple SQ2 is the "safest" choice in my opinion for someone who isn't sure what they want.

Within the SQ2 line, the Maple shells have the richest tone, the cleanest tone, and the best resonance. They're also incredibly punchy and articulate. Look no further than THIS VIDEO.

Beech is also very good, just not quite as good IMO. It's like the difference between A and A+.

Birch is also very good, but not quite as "middle of the road" as Maple because it has a shorter more pointed tone. IF you do like that tone though, I'd recommend just buying a Sonor SQ1 instead. SQ1s are basically SQ2s with limited finish options, and they cost thousands less.

You'll also have to pick the SIZES for each drum. For a good 5-piece kit that will appeal to the most drummers, be the most "future proof" and have the highest resale value, I would go with something like this...

Bass drum: 22x16" (or 22x17")
Rack toms: 10x8" and 12x9". (10x7 and 12x8 works too)
Floor tom: 16x16"
Snare: 14x6"

I would probably choose Medium shells for the entire kit.
 

Darth Vater

Senior Member
For SQ2 Medium beech for bass drum, Medium maple for toms and heavy beech for snare. If you're planning on choosing vintage thin maple shells, just buy a prolite kit.

For sizes I'd go everything the same that Ibiteprettyhard listed that's not in parentheses PLUS a 13x10 for a 3 up 1 down config.

I have some experience with Sonor kits so I'm not talking out my arse here. I currently use a Sonor Phonic Reissue 14x5.75 12 ply (10 ply beech /w Rosewood veneer inside and out) snare with a Prolite Stage 3 kit 22-8-10-12-16. The 8x7 was bought a few days later. It's a total joy to play. So much so that I've sold everything else that I had except for a 14x6 Hendrix Archetype Stave Walnut snare that I use for a side snare.

There ya go! Have I spent enough of your money yet? ;)
 
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WallyY

Platinum Member
Asking about SQ2s will get you nowhere.

If I was building and SQ2 set it would be:
12x9 medium birch
13x9 medium beech
15x16 medium maple
And 22x15 heavy beech or 24x15.

Tuned bright.

I have a certain like, and I like Sonors. it’s probably very different from what most people would choose to build.
 

Row

Junior Member
There is no best option and you will get different answers from everyone. I would go medium birch...see? If you don't know which wood to get I would not buy SQ2. SQ2 is for when you know EXACTLY what you want.
 

Tamaefx

Silver Member

If you haven’t got a hard conviction about what you really need, I would go Prolite :
Nice shell configuration: thin maple, re-ring, nice finish, ... stock.
 

If you haven’t got a hard conviction about what you really need, I would go Prolite :
Nice shell configuration: thin maple, re-ring, nice finish, ... stock.
But lacking a tom mount on top ;)
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
I'm very jelly. The SQ1 in GT Black was my #1 pick, but it was out of my budget.

I ended up going with a Gretsch Renown RN2 in 20/10/12/14/16 (the 16" was special ordered). It's awesome and has even exceeded my expectations.

Maybe one day I'll have a Sonor kit. I saw the black SQ1 in person at Guitar Center and it sounded great. The quality of the finish really stood out to me as well.
 
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