Sonor SQ1 (brand new kit) problems

cbphoto

Gold Member
I bought the kit as new from a dealer. I only got the kit. The kit clearly isn't in the new condition I was led to believe it was.
So, the kit was inspected & assembled by/at the shop?
 
So, the kit was inspected & assembled by/at the shop?

They assembled the kit. It was on display for some period of time. I saw it for sale and enquired about it. I was given what I now know to be misleading information. They packed it up and sent it to me claiming it was in new condition. I would imagine that a close inspection should have been done before shipping it. But if that inspection did take place then they were okay with selling it like that despite the fact it didn't meet the description I was given. Or an inspection didn't take place at all. No way to know for sure. Either way I got a bad kit. It's waiting to be returned.
 
If all of the above wasn't bad enough...the dealer is now trying to avoid complying with EU consumer laws in the process of returning the kit. Again, this is a tale of making sure you buy from the right dealer who does right by its customers. I'm hoping Sonor will step in and deal with the matter to make sure the right thing is done. If not...legal action. What a wonderful experience this turned out to be.
 

Justinhub2003

Well-known member
Time to become a Tama player. View attachment 101073

No one is above failure. The spring broke on my 700 dollar tama Dynasync pedal 3 days after purchasing it. And I replaced the lug on my Old hyperdrive snare 4x in 2 years because it broke under after my rim shots.


I think the Tama star line is the only Tama line I’d consider because it’s made in Japan. And they are really expensive, more then an SQ1 I believe.
 
No one is above failure. The spring broke on my 700 dollar tama Dynasync pedal 3 days after purchasing it. And I replaced the lug on my Old hyperdrive snare 4x in 2 years because it broke under after my rim shots.


I think the Tama star line is the only Tama line I’d consider because it’s made in Japan. And they are really expensive, more then an SQ1 I believe.

Of course no one is above failure. It happens. What matters is how they deal with it.

But in this case, I was sold a kit that shouldn't have been allowed out of the shop. That's the real difference. Which means I'm in a situation where I was sold a faulty item and EU consumer laws are very clear on this. I sent images of the discolouration and rust to the dealer and Sonor. The dealer is trying to claim they can't see any issue in the photos because they don't want to accept the cost of the return. There's red/brown rust and they're saying they can't see it. It's ridiculous.

Tama Star kits are pretty expensive. More in line with European prices on SQ2 kits.

But I don't think this episode says you shouldn't buy Sonor. Don't take that away from this. It all lies with the dealer. How they are responding to the situation only proves this.
 

Darth Vater

Senior Member
If all of the above wasn't bad enough...the dealer is now trying to avoid complying with EU consumer laws in the process of returning the kit. Again, this is a tale of making sure you buy from the right dealer who does right by its customers. I'm hoping Sonor will step in and deal with the matter to make sure the right thing is done. If not...legal action. What a wonderful experience this turned out to be.
🍿
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Maybe I'm alone in this, but a big fat rubber gasket sandwiched between a steel mount and a wooden drum doesnt seem like the greatest idea for isolating resonance. Rubber is normally used to eliminate vibrations. Sonor says they looked into the auto industry and how they isolate vibrations to come up with this mount. The auto industry does everything they can to ELIMINATE NVH (noise, vibrations, harshness). I'm of the opinion the mount it doing exactly what it is supposed to do. My money says if you dump the rubber part and go direct to shell with the steel mount the drum will sing again.

To simplify for those who dont think about this stuff, what happens when you put a piece of soft material on a drumhead? It goes dead. Same idea, different application.
 

Woolwich

Silver Member
Maybe I'm alone in this, but a big fat rubber gasket sandwiched between a steel mount and a wooden drum doesnt seem like the greatest idea for isolating resonance. Rubber is normally used to eliminate vibrations. Sonor says they looked into the auto industry and how they isolate vibrations to come up with this mount. The auto industry does everything they can to ELIMINATE NVH (noise, vibrations, harshness). I'm of the opinion the mount it doing exactly what it is supposed to do. My money says if you dump the rubber part and go direct to shell with the steel mount the drum will sing again.

To simplify for those who dont think about this stuff, what happens when you put a piece of soft material on a drumhead? It goes dead. Same idea, different application.

I've been thinking the same, my reference point was the old trick of placing a ruler on a desk, firmly planting one end then twanging the free end. Replace your firm hand with a rubbery softer grip and there's no twang.
 

Al Strange

Well-known member
Maybe I'm alone in this, but a big fat rubber gasket sandwiched between a steel mount and a wooden drum doesnt seem like the greatest idea for isolating resonance. Rubber is normally used to eliminate vibrations. Sonor says they looked into the auto industry and how they isolate vibrations to come up with this mount. The auto industry does everything they can to ELIMINATE NVH (noise, vibrations, harshness). I'm of the opinion the mount it doing exactly what it is supposed to do. My money says if you dump the rubber part and go direct to shell with the steel mount the drum will sing again.

To simplify for those who dont think about this stuff, what happens when you put a piece of soft material on a drumhead? It goes dead. Same idea, different application.
Just to paraphrase for the avoidance of doubt, what you’re saying is the OP should’ve bought Pearl? :unsure:
 

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
@sonorplayer - I'd be curious to see the rust/discoloration you've referenced. You mentioned you sent the photos to the dealer and Sonor. Care to post them here so we can also see what you're referring to (and as a caution to others)?
 

Darth Vater

Senior Member
Maybe I'm alone in this, but a big fat rubber gasket sandwiched between a steel mount and a wooden drum doesnt seem like the greatest idea for isolating resonance. Rubber is normally used to eliminate vibrations. Sonor says they looked into the auto industry and how they isolate vibrations to come up with this mount. The auto industry does everything they can to ELIMINATE NVH (noise, vibrations, harshness). I'm of the opinion the mount it doing exactly what it is supposed to do. My money says if you dump the rubber part and go direct to shell with the steel mount the drum will sing again.

To simplify for those who dont think about this stuff, what happens when you put a piece of soft material on a drumhead? It goes dead. Same idea, different application.
You make a good point but the only points of contact between the shell and the mount are the 3 tabs. There's space in between the round area of the rubber and the shell. Just an FYI tryin' to 'splain. I'm not a big fan of the mount but my biggest beef with Sonor are the L-arms of the 4000 series hardware. They're too short on one end. I've replaced all of mine on my Prolite/4000 series hardware with the longer versions from the Vintage Series. With my SQ1 kit I fly the toms with Mapex Soniclear tom arms off of Gibraltar 6709 cymbal stands. They're hex like Sonor L arms but again have much better length.

Disclaimer: I'm a very stupid man and I'm sure none the above will work for anyone else. 🥴
 
@sonorplayer - I'd be curious to see the rust/discoloration you've referenced. You mentioned you sent the photos to the dealer and Sonor. Care to post them here so we can also see what you're referring to (and as a caution to others)?

I kind of want to avoid posting the images...at least for now. Mainly because I think its more due to how the kit was mishandled by the dealership.

The image shows what it should look like. If you look at those metal plates that sit in the rubber. Each sustainer has three of them. All of the metal surface is discoloured and looks something like a rainbow. At the edge where the metal meets the rubber...is a line of rust that follows the entire shape of the metal.

On one of the the metal plates there's a hairline crack in the metal kind of like a U shape.

All the sustainers are affected to one degree or another. One of them has some rubber worn off as if something was pressing against it.

I sent images to clearly illustrate the issues to the dealer and Sonor. The dealer is claiming he can't see anything in the images. These are high resolution images and all the issues are very clear in the images. You would have to be blind to miss them.

As it is the dealer is in violation of my EU consumer rights simply because the kit didn't arrive in the condition described.

I've re-sent the images to the dealer and Sonor with arrows drawn on it just to make 100% clear where the issues are.

Also, the sustainers aren't the only problem. It looks like either the shell or the hoop of the 14 floor tom is slightly warped.
 

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RickP

Gold Member
Anofher forum member posted a year or two ago about the sound sustainer rubber discolouring his blue SQ1 kit . He posted the response from Sonor , where they acknowledged that there was an issue with the first batch of Sound Sustainers and that they corrected the issue with the newer batch of sustainers .
Sonorplayer Mentioned that this drum set had sat in the store for quite some time before he bought it . I wonder if this is related to the issues the OP has discussed ?
 
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