something i just noticed that i do

bigbang

Pioneer Member
So, obviously I've been off (same as everyone) and i decided to work on brushes in the downtime. I grabbed the brushes and started playing , looked down and boom....I play traditional grip with brushes. When I play with sticks ...I go to matched.
This was a subconscious thing.
Anybody else do this ?
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I haven't used traditional grip since my early days as a drummer back in the mid-80s, but brushes do seem to have a subconscious link to traditional grip. Images come to mind of jazz drummers from the 40s and so on, most of whom employed traditional grip. I use brushes regularly in my country work but always do so with matched grip. My take has always been that matched grip is far more versatile and efficient behind a drum kit, though many will disagree with that claim. I use German Grip (palms down, fingers on sides of sticks) for every stroke I execute. The thumbs-up method (French Grip) has always seemed strange to me.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I started traditional then after hiatus started back matched. The lateral motion of brushes just feel better traditional-even both hands traditional. I play both matched though after a long time trying everything. I like brushes with extendible wires cause the loop is great for one finger to pivot on matched for sliding across-I also use my index finger to move the stick laterally besides wrist. I tried the big sweeps but I tend to use smaller -which is great with a 13 in snare LOL. I practice rudiments with brushes like sticks and like brushes-I like the springy momentum from brushes-it's a great cheat. I haven't been playing them like I was need to get back-appears I have time to do so.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I think it has to do with the horizontal action of brush work. With traditional grip, your fingers can more easily play with the horizontal action.
That makes sense. With German grip, I use my wrists more than my fingers, though my fingers do, of course, provide control, balance, and dynamics. They just aren't the primary catalysts of motion. I can see how traditional grip would be highly useful in jazz applications. Jazz isn't my genre, though.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Reverse trad with sticks? Are you insane?

Man your hair must look a fright.
I can't do it at all with my left, but it feels completely natural righty. I don't play like that at the kit, but I mess with it a lot on the pad.

My hair is a sore subject right now. Bosley, Hair Club for Men, Rogaine, and a Capillus Cap couldn't save me at this point. I'll look like Gallagher within 5 years.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I can't do it at all with my left, but it feels completely natural righty. I don't play like that at the kit, but I mess with it a lot on the pad.

My hair is a sore subject right now. Bosley, Hair Club for Men, Rogaine, and a Capillus Cap couldn't save me at this point. I'll look like Gallagher within 5 years.
A pad is one thing; I can't imagine going reverse-traditional on a hi-hat, though I suppose someone out there is doing it.

I started shaving my head (with a razor) in the late 90s and never turned back. I love the streamlined simplicity. I've also saved thousands on hair maintenance. The one drawback: Drumming works up quite a sweat at times, and with no hair, there's nothing on your head to absorb it. A bandanna or hat is helpful. When I use neither, I just towel off after songs.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I can't do it at all with my left, but it feels completely natural righty. I don't play like that at the kit, but I mess with it a lot on the pad.

My hair is a sore subject right now. Bosley, Hair Club for Men, Rogaine, and a Capillus Cap couldn't save me at this point. I'll look like Gallagher within 5 years.
You could grow chia hair.

It grows just like human hair. Maybe they could come out with a non-green variety. And it won't come off lol.

When it gets too long, you could hang around salad bars and let people eat it.
 
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