So...what do you think?

805Drummer

Gold Member
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQe0Na5cZF4

So that's my most recent playing, as of today. However, I'm always more nervous when being recorded (only for drumming, I'm a complete wacko when doing comedy), so there's a few mistakes. I just made the video to record how my new Paiste PST 5 16" Thin Crash sounds, which is UHHHHHMAZING! It makes my PST 3 sound like an utter piece of crap. And now I can actually use my splash!

What can I improve on?
 
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beatsMcGee

Pioneer Member
if you want some advice on improving, i would say those doubles and rolls your doing on the hi hat could be more clear and sharper sounding.. open them up a bit and get a cleaner roll.. your grip didn't look really solid to me. also i think you should position your self so your not flaring your limbs out as much when on the hi hat... it seems to prohibit you.

on a lighter side it sounded pretty good and creative.. and your drums sounded nice too. good stuff.
 

Wavelength

Platinum Member
Nice grooving! I noticed that you tend to strike the snare drum towards the outer edge, which is a common problem with younger (smaller) drummers. Try to approach the drum "around the barrel" so that you can target the center of the head more easily.
 

king fail

Senior Member
you're getting a strong foundation here dude, it's nice to see you improving :)
not a fan of the drum sound though, but that's just my opinion.
You should definitely work on your rolls, and try and feel what you're playing a bit more, get some dynamics in and have some fun :)
oh and yeah, what wavelength said.
 

805Drummer

Gold Member
if you want some advice on improving, i would say those doubles and rolls your doing on the hi hat could be more clear and sharper sounding.. open them up a bit and get a cleaner roll.. your grip didn't look really solid to me. also i think you should position your self so your not flaring your limbs out as much when on the hi hat... it seems to prohibit you.

on a lighter side it sounded pretty good and creative.. and your drums sounded nice too. good stuff.
About my hi-hat doubles and drags...I'm flaring my limbs because I'm short and the hi-hat is so far up, however, I've tried and tried, and I don't think my hihat stand goes any lower.
 

805Drummer

Gold Member
you're getting a strong foundation here dude, it's nice to see you improving :)
not a fan of the drum sound though, but that's just my opinion.
You should definitely work on your rolls, and try and feel what you're playing a bit more, get some dynamics in and have some fun :)
oh and yeah, what wavelength said.
Usually I'm totally into it, to the point where I'm doing that weird humming thing mentioned in another thread, but whenever I turn the camera on, I seem to be under pressure. Same thing when playing for an audience. It sucks, because even when I'm playing for one person, I'm worse than by myself.

My goal to fix this problem, since I haven't found another band, is to constantly record my drumming, upload it to Youtube, etc. it'd be awesome if anyone on this forum who's already on Youtube to subscribe to my account, KingofDrumming, so they could critique me on Youtube, and I could look back and track my progress.
 

stasz

Platinum Member
I always say that recording yourself and listening back is one of the best ways to advance your progress on the drums. I like that you focus on staying in time in grooving, although I did enjoy those fills too. Nice job. I would agree with the comment about flailing the hi-hat strokes. You may like that technique but I prefer to relax and use as little effort as I need to.
 

bojangleman

Platinum Member
The trick is not to take several short clips, but keep the camera rolling for a longer time. Sooner or later you'll forget about the camera.
thats very true!

then later, you can take which clips you want, and not have to get it right once...

Alex
 
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