So what’s your drumming story (your career and experiences to date)?

cdrums21

Gold Member
I thought it would be interesting to see what type of experiences and drumming “careers” people have had and currently enjoy. Kinda get to know the posters on here a little more in depth drumming wise. For me, I started playing as a self taught drummer in central Pennsylvania when I was 17 in 1975. I kept at it, got better and started playing with better musicians. Played in cover bands mostly until 1983 when I was in an original rock band that had a minor hit record on the east coast. We toured a bit and opened for many big acts of the day. I loved the recording process and became a studio drummer in a local studio while gigging. I was in many really successful rock bands over the course of the next 25 years, playing hundreds and hundreds of shows, and then after much thought, I moved to Nashville to persue a session career. I have a great friend there who is a first call session guitarist that helped me get a foot in the door. I played some sessions, but things have changed quite a bit with budgets and such and I wasn’t doing enough to survive. I had to return to “normal” life and stayed south in the Atlanta area. I had a couple opportunities to play in some cool stuff in Atlanta, but they just didn’t pan out. I don’t play out in rock clubs anymore, different scene nowadays, but I do gig out occasionally with my old band mates. Great fun. How about you all?
 
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Paul Blood

Junior Member
I stated with a drum teacher in 1976, and I'm lucky that my non musician parents were supportive, making sure I got to my lessons, and taking me to lots of concerts. My anglo dad liked Sinatra and all the great jazz singers, and my Latina mom liked Celia Cruz, Tito Puente and other salsa acts. They would take me to Buddy Rich shows and other very high quality shows whenever they could. I am very lucky I went to a high school that had a very good jazz band, marching, concert band, orchestra and musical theater program, I participated in everything I could at school while also playing rock garage bands that played at local parties. Good times! I wasn't the greatest academic student so I did sometime at a community college (LA Harbor) then PIT, and then Univ of North Texas. I studied with over 30 drum/percussion teachers! After college I gigged on a cruise ship, and after that I held a steady gig for 5 years, 5 nights a week, at a restaurant club playing flamenco music during which time I got my masters in Music Education. I've played a pretty diverse list of styles including, punk, classic rock, big band jazz, straight ahead jazz, salsa, tejano, regional Mexican, contemporary Christian, traditional Jewish, and with an Asian dance band. Even did a stint with a rapper. Yes, a jack of all trades master of none! I still gig, mostly as a keyboardist/singer, but I still get calls to sub for drummers in all sorts of situations. Besides teaching drums/percussion, piano,voice and guitar, I teach Spanish. I keep busy, and love what I do!
 

cdrums21

Gold Member
I stated with a drum teacher in 1976, and I'm lucky that my non musician parents were supportive, making sure I got to my lessons, and taking me to lots of concerts. My anglo dad liked Sinatra and all the great jazz singers, and my Latina mom liked Celia Cruz, Tito Puente and other salsa acts. They would take me to Buddy Rich shows and other very high quality shows whenever they could. I am very lucky I went to a high school that had a very good jazz band, marching, concert band, orchestra and musical theater program, I participated in everything I could at school while also playing rock garage bands that played at local parties. Good times! I wasn't the greatest academic student so I did sometime at a community college (LA Harbor) then PIT, and then Univ of North Texas. I studied with over 30 drum/percussion teachers! After college I gigged on a cruise ship, and after that I held a steady gig for 5 years, 5 nights a week, at a restaurant club playing flamenco music during which time I got my masters in Music Education. I've played a pretty diverse list of styles including, punk, classic rock, big band jazz, straight ahead jazz, salsa, tejano, regional Mexican, contemporary Christian, traditional Jewish, and with an Asian dance band. Even did a stint with a rapper. Yes, a jack of all trades master of none! I still gig, mostly as a keyboardist/singer, but I still get calls to sub for drummers in all sorts of situations. Besides teaching drums/percussion, piano,voice and guitar, I teach Spanish. I keep busy, and love what I do!
That’s awesome man. I’m so glad you replied. I hope more people share their story, really interesting and cool stuff!
 

Juniper

Gold Member
Started playing aged 13 in 1996 in the West Country of the UK.

I was given a pair of sticks by my uncle years previous, my uncle was Chet Bakers drummer and the house drummer at Ronnie Scott's, amongst other achievements from a long career. Drumming seems to run in the family (there are four of us) and taking up the drums was like a lightbulb moment, especially after a few years of playing the trumpet as a boy.

Played in cover bands for a few years and then joined my first originals band in 2000. Moved to Manchester in 2003 aged 19 with bandmates, then moved near London in 2006 with my amazing other half and picked things up there.

Since 2003 I've played extensively with original bands, gigging and recording. I've toured, supporting a worldwide household name band which was a great experience playing to thousands each night, I've played to a packed out Union Chapel in London but I've also had many more great experiences playing to handfuls of people/empty rooms in various London venues (and probably learned more from those gigs) so I've cut my teeth on both sides of the spectrum.

Here's an insight, the bigger gigs are actually easier and less nervy as you're somewhat disconnected from the audience.

If there's a longstanding venue in London or Manchester the chances are I've played it numerous times. Met many great people in the industry and I've studied with some UK greats. Still on good terms with all of my ex bandmates also so I don't feel I've burned any bridges along the way. Used to rent a recording studio with bandmates, more great experience.

Me and my uncle now swap stories when we catch up.

Currently taking a break from music while we watch our newborn daughter grow in her first year. Don't want to miss a moment, plus she'll be the fifth drummer in the family if I get my way 😉

I feel like I've been very fortunate (and lucky) to have had a lifetime of experiences already and I'm still in my late 30's so I'm good to leave it to one side for a year or two, family is more important, plus I'm very content with what I have now and have had up to this day.

Wished that I'd documented it more and I've probably forgotten more than I can remember though, that's one regret.
 

cdrums21

Gold Member
Started playing aged 13 in 1996 in the West Country of the UK.

I was given a pair of sticks by my uncle years previous, my uncle was Chet Bakers drummer and the house drummer at Ronnie Scott's, amongst other achievements from a long career. Drumming seems to run in the family (there are four of us) and taking up the drums was like a lightbulb moment, especially after a few years of playing the trumpet as a boy.

Played in cover bands for a few years and then joined my first originals band in 2000. Moved to Manchester in 2003 aged 19 with bandmates, then moved near London in 2006 with my amazing other half and picked things up there.

Since 2003 I've played extensively with original bands, gigging and recording. I've toured, supporting a worldwide household name band which was a great experience playing to thousands each night, I've played to a packed out Union Chapel in London but I've also had many more great experiences playing to handfuls of people/empty rooms in various London venues (and probably learned more from those gigs) so I've cut my teeth on both sides of the spectrum.

Here's an insight, the bigger gigs are actually easier and less nervy as you're somewhat disconnected from the audience.

If there's a longstanding venue in London or Manchester the chances are I've played it numerous times. Met many great people in the industry and I've studied with some UK greats. Still on good terms with all of my ex bandmates also so I don't feel I've burned any bridges along the way. Used to rent a recording studio with bandmates, more great experience.

Me and my uncle now swap stories when we catch up.

Currently taking a break from music while we watch our newborn daughter grow in her first year. Don't want to miss a moment, plus she'll be the fifth drummer in the family if I get my way 😉

I feel like I've been very fortunate (and lucky) to have had a lifetime of experiences already and I'm still in my late 30's so I'm good to leave it to one side for a year or two, family is more important, plus I'm very content with what I have now and have had up to this day.

Wished that I'd documented it more and I've probably forgotten more than I can remember though, that's one regret.
So cool. Your insight about the large gigs is spot on. I was much more relaxed in front of 3000 as opposed to 30. God bless your precious little one and take in every moment man, they grow up so quickly.
 

Juniper

Gold Member
So cool. Your insight about the large gigs is spot on. I was much more relaxed in front of 3000 as opposed to 30. God bless your precious little one and take in every moment man, they grow up so quickly.

Thanks mate and yes, 30 is more nervy than 3,000 - without a doubt. You’re somewhat disconnected from the audience when they are in the thousands, plus you can’t see most of them if there’s a lighting crew doing their job.

I was always more excited, than nervous, playing those bigger shows.

And thank you, it’s appreciated. On our daughter it’s time I’ll never get back after all.

She’s more important than being away from our home and hitting things with sticks.
 

cdrums21

Gold Member
Thanks mate and yes, 30 is more nervy than 3,000 - without a doubt. You’re somewhat disconnected from the audience when they are in the thousands, plus you can’t see most of them if there’s a lighting crew doing their job.

I was always more excited, than nervous, playing those bigger shows.

And thank you, it’s appreciated. On our daughter it’s time I’ll never get back after all.

She’s more important than being away from our home and hitting things with sticks.
You know it man. I have 2 daughters and there is something about little girls that steal my heart. So sweet. Congratulations man and thanks so much for sharing your story!!
 

Rotarded

Senior Member
Started with grade school band in the late 60's. Mostly first chair throughout the years. Was in marching band freshman year in HS, then soccer year around happened and band classes ended, but was still drumming on everything in sight. The parents bought me a kit early my junior year and I started to teach myself. Formed a punk band senior year (1980) and played (and won) the senior show, then 1 sold out gig before I went off to college on a soccer scholarship.

I kept the kit at my parents house for 3 years, then took it to my apartment where it gathered dust mostly. Noodled around for the next 25 years, barely playing. Got married, worked 90 hours a week, and played maybe a few times a year in the basement.

8 years ago I walked into my local watering hole to see a corner full of equipment and a flyer on the wall for "open stage nite". After about an hour, the host had set up and a few people joined him to jam. The person playing drums, if you want to call it that, was just terrible. Like never played a kit before bad! So, I walked up and asked to sit in. I never left the kit that night. The host asked me to come the next week. I played the next week, and at the end the host asked me if I wanted to join his cover band. I did.

So now in disbelief that 8 years have passed, and I am the only remaining original member of the band. The people who have joined along the way are all phenomenal musicians, and I feel blessed to be able to share the stage with them. We've done hundreds of shows around the local Ohio venues, and a few that have taken us outside of Ohio, and as far as Southern Virginia . I look forward to the next 10 years......
 
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wraub

Well-known member
As a bass player, I've played with many excellent drummers, and I'm always listening... As a drummer, I'm just starting, but I'm learning quickly. ;)

I've long been considered pretty good as a bass player... I aspire to not being low-average as a drummer. :D
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Been a guitar player for most of my life. I've had a few lesson on drums before as part school, but nothing serious.

Started playing drums at age 32 in 2009 when I got my firts full time teaching gig at a small town public music school and had to teach everyone in the band.

I took it seriously. Got up every morning to practice from 6 am to 12 pm. for the first 3 years. Had lunch and went to teach. Started hanging on Drummerworld hence had an idea of what books to get. Also bought pretty much everything the had at Hudson Music. Usually no one to take lessons from where I live, but I would drive to a city once in a while and hire someone for a full day or two of lessons.

After 25 years of playing, studying and living off of guitar playing it's really been mostly about the drums since then. These are not the only instruments I play, but they are the main ones I can play on a professional level.

I'm not sure if my days as a full time musician are over, but I haven't been doing that on the drums, just a gig here and there. A lot is just being involved and making things happen musically in the local environment. Life has thrown many a curveball these last few years which has led to more political involvement in how our music schools are run. That's where my new organization Drumming For Equality comes in, but the real work is to hassle officials and politicians.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
I've been playing since I was 4, my parents are musos so I was always encouraged to learn an instrument young. My dad taught me how to play guitar and I learnt how to sing harmony but drumming came naturally. My parents never forced me into it like you see with a lot of kids in particular with sport.

I've always learnt everything by ear and got the feel that way.

I was self taught until secondary school, went to uni and was very lucky to have a teacher who was a moeller technique specialist so I came out of uni an infinitely better drummer than I went in.

Never really done much original stuff, my folks were working musicians and always taught me to get paid for your craft so I've done paid gigs since I was 18/19 mainly. I was doing original stuff on the death rolls of the Stourbridge scene which had spawned the Wonderstuff, Neds Atomic Dustbin ten years earlier and Babylon Zoo (on behalf of the whole Black Country I apologise for that god awful Spaceman song). I was briefly with a band who were signed to the same label as Deep Purple but as with most indie bands the ego far outweighs the talent.

I did the UK bike rally circuit for a couple of years, absolute scream just didn't pay too well but I got to play all over the UK and did some gigs infront of thousands of people which is a great experience. There's never any kind of trouble on the bike circuit, if you want to see how to do a festival right, look at those guys. They leave places spotless whilst enjoying themselves at the same time.

Me and my friends had a lockup where we wrote music for our enjoyment without the ballache of the original scene when we got a call from a singer (friend of a friend) looking do functions with lots of paid gigs lined up, we all had music degrees and had did covers anyway so it was easy money. Been doing that ever since. I also have a little band that does local pub gigs for beer money and to stop me from going insane doing weddings and functions.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Bongos at age 9, first set at age 10, basement bands until age 16, actual bands from age 16 to present (61) with a 20 year break starting at age 25 to learn how to make enough money to own a house. Returned to music in late 2003 after my electrical business got a life of it's own. I never made it past the bar/party/festival level. I'm on no commercial recordings. That sounds bitter but I'm not at all. I'm glad I don't have to rely on music to pay my monthly nut. Drumming provides me a great counter balance to being an electrician.
 

cdrums21

Gold Member
I never made it past the bar/party/festival level. I'm on no commercial recordings. That sounds bitter but I'm not at all. I'm glad I don't have to rely on music to pay my monthly nut. Drumming provides me a great counter balance to being an electrician.
We all share a love of drumming and are drumming brothers no matter what level we achieve. Thanks for taking the time to post!
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I started drum lessons as a kid back in 1984, studying with the same instructor, a professional studio musician, for five years. I was gigging by 1987, as well as performing in school bands, both marching and concert. I don't know precisely how many gigs I've done, but the number is easily in the hundreds. At one time, I was gigging three days a week and getting paid for it. Most of my drumming income has come from participation in bands that perform at weddings, private parties, corporate events, and so on. I've gigged in just about every way one can gig -- clubs, bars, restaurants, hotels, arenas, even on floats in parades and stages at Mardi Gras. I've also been in long-term bands that play nothing but original material, and I've done quite a bit of recording in that capacity. My primary genres are country and rock.

I've always carried business cards that read "Session Drummer." Lots of opportunities have come my way through their circulation. If you can walk into a setting on the spur of the moment and play what needs to be played without making a nuisance of yourself, you can find work as a drummer. It's just a matter of having confidence that you can deliver and the maturity to deliver it without drama.
 

iCe

Senior Member
I was always drawn to the instrument. Something appealed to me that a drummer was (literally in most cases) the center of the stage. And that there is just something about the sizes of the drums and how much space they take up compared to a guitar. But i always had a natural attraction to it. When i was 2 years old i got a toy drumset for 'Sinterklaas' (December 5th, similar to Santa Claus: kids get presents if they behaved haha) and i remember being fond of it. There is even a videotape of when i got in (1986) and it's surprising on how well i mimicked the drummer on a tape, even to the cymbal chokes!

When i was six orso i wanted to pick an instrument, but my parents would allow a drumset (too much noise). Go a guitar and lessons for half a year, but it was too busy playing outdoors than rehearing. But i always was busy making drumsets outs of boxes and containers, much to the dismay of my poor sister who'd find all her toys on the ground and plastic boxes with holes in them (they don't respond well to sticks hehe). Few years later we got a neighbor who had a drumset and he let me play it a couple of times until he moved out, but i remember enjoying it immensely.

Flash forward 1998. Met a new friend in school and he had a drumset. Spent some afternoons drumming there on a real drumset and that really got me thinking 'i want a drumset!'. Talked to me parents and to my surprise they allowed it because they could see how passionate i was about it. So my dad knew a music place and we went to visit it. They had this beautiful Pearl Export in Deep Blue finish, but was out of my budget; luckily they a payment system that allowed me to pay half and pay the rest a year later (which i could save up for with me job at the supermarkter after school). So i took it how with a set of Paiste 302's and that's how it all started.

I played on it everyday. Just trying to groove or playing along with CD's or cassette tapes. Eventually went through what almost every drummer has: you break heads, sticks, cymbals etc. Learned a lot in that period. Also internet was up and coming, so i spent a lot of time on the Pearl Drummers Forum and on Drummerworld. Was amazed on how much videos there were and that i could download them. Took a lot of inspiration from those vids and helped me get a better drummer. Friends knew i was a drummer and joined an (awful) band, recorded some songs (which is a lot of fun on parties since it 's sooooo bad), met other musicians, went to jam sessions and learned a lot on playing with others and playing live. Was really dedicated at that time and around 2004/2005 i was thinking of going to music college to study the instrument, but i was to afraid that forcing myself to play the instrument or to make a living out of it would diminish my passion for the instrument.

Around 2005/2006 the 2 bands i was in broke up and i was done with playing in bands. Around that time my parents moved and i couldn't play at home anymore. Around 2007 i moved away for my study and drumming was sidetracked for the next 4 years. I did play in a coverband every Christmas Eve for 5 years, which was a lot of fun doing all the covers and to play live.

After i got my bachelors in july 2011 i wanted to pick up drumming again. Got me a set of Zildjians A's, responded to an add of a guitarist and bassist seeking a drummer for a prog band and still play with that guitar player to this day (bassist left after 2 or 3 years). We didn't gig because the guitar player only wanted to if we got payed (which meant it never got off the ground), so around 2014 the new bass player left and we played till 2016 or so before taking an hiatus for a year or so. Also joined a rock band that years after filling in on their demo because their drummer was sick, but few weeks later joined the band. Did a lot of those 'battle of the bands' gigs or other similar gigs, but never broke through really. It was fun though, but that music was basic; steady 4/4 beats and i was starting to miss my true love: progressive rock.

So the guitar player and me got back together to jam a bit, play the songs again and we realized how much we missed it. So we started again in the summer of 2017 and after a while we started working on new songs. But it really helped me realized (also because other life events) that i wasn't happy in that rock band: i didn't want to sacrifice a fridaynight an evening in the weekend just to play for 20-30 people who comments on our music (i could't care less on the opinions of others on our music), the band was stagnant, no improvements in playing and i got more and more that i didn't want to gig (rest of the band did). So after 3 months of thinking about it i pulled the plug: we got an invite for a friday night jam session gig (start around 7, so the jamsession could start at 8, but that meant almost no audience) and my first reaction was 'oh hell no'. So i told them i quit, because they deserve a drummer who is committed and motivated.

Best choice ever. Now i play with just with that guitar player, gave up on our quest for a bass player and enjoy how we make music. We just do it for the fun of it, but with total dedication. Don't feel the need to promote it or conquer the world with our music. Feel comfortable at the kit now, know what i can and can't do and just go with the flow. If someone would ask me to do a gig or record something i would, but very happy with what i have now :)
 

cdrums21

Gold Member
If you can walk into a setting on the spur of the moment and play what needs to be played without making a nuisance of yourself, you can find work as a drummer. It's just a matter of having confidence that you can deliver and the maturity to deliver it without drama.
Yep, my advice for longevity as a drummer would be to keep great time, to play a solid groove and listen to the other band members so as not to step on their parts. Be a fun hang, make your band mates laugh harder than ever and you'll gig for a long time. ;)
 

bearblastbeats

Senior Member
Cool thread! Love all of these stories!!!

I started out young behind the kit, my father was a drummer, my older brother is also a drummer. We grew up banging on dads old luddies, going to his band practices, and even his shows watching his bands pack places in the seacoast of NH. Funny thing is that the three of us are all flooring installers as well. Our father set us up to have the skills to entertain and also be craftsmen in our trades.

Our dad was a legend. In the 70's-90's in the cover band scene, made it to the papers with his bands Asylum and Helms Deep, they honored him the name 'Many Moons DiCicco" and "Bam-Bam". I never realized how fortunate I was to have that until his funeral where over 300+ people came to honor him as the musician and the friend that he was.

I eventually grew past being a flooring installer and went to school for architecture and engineering. I've worked in a few different firms and industries the past decade and have held positions ranging from drafter/designers, project engineer, to project manager.

Since the birth of my son last year, I decided to take a step back and focus on family. I left the high paying PM life with all of its travel requirements to a closer to home estimating job where I get to be home every night by 530. I'm more driven now to be a good father after losing both my parents at a young age, and I want to provide to him everything I never had. This even means taking a step back from music as well.

Being that I have played for 3 decades now, I'm 33. I can say I am comfortable in my efforts with what I have done with music. I have recorded a few records, I've packed up the 15 passenger van with all our gear and alternating sleep/driving shifts throughout the east coast playing festivals. I made a few bucks here and there play in cover bands with great friends of mine. I've had ladies come and dance next to us buying us drinks packing the bar scenes, sleeping on floors, and being p*** drunk falling over on the kit in my punk rock days.

I now get to enjoy my time with my boy as he holds the sticks and smashes the drums and experiences the different sounds he can create. He loves it so much and I melt every time his face lights up with joy. He is going to be a natural, he bangs on everything he can in the house already!

I shared a thread some time ago where I refurbished my dad's 76 luddie, I still have it today. It's tucked away in their cases for now. One day my son & I will re-wrap it to it's white marine pearl finish and he will take the torch when it is time.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Yep, my advice for longevity as a drummer would be to keep great time, to play a solid groove and listen to the other band members so as not to step on their parts. Be a fun hang, make your band mates laugh harder than ever and you'll gig for a long time. ;)

No question. The best way for a drummer to lead is to allow guitarists and vocalists to cling to the illusion that they're the ones leading. We all know who controls the metronome, however. :devilish: A drummer's authority is subtle but absolute.
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
My story is a little funky.

I played sax in school...then one day we played "wipeout" in like 7th grade and I remember thinking to myself "I could do that. easy" - and as it turns out - I could. So I had this natural inclination on drums... and then I got obsessed and played like 3-4 hours a day all through high school.


I was also lucky to have a band director that was a drummer - so he gave me all these Weckl CDs and the Burning for Buddy tapes, etc.

Well anyways - cut to Senior Year in HS - I Worked at a local public radio station and had my own little jazz show, so they sent me to the Telluride Jazz Festival where I got to interview Kevin Eubanks (and Smitty, etc.). So the structure of that gig is that after you play the main festival - all the artists gig around town so you can get like a longer set right...so since I went to his gig and said Hi and all that and told him I was a drummer too, etc. Well it was like 1am and they let me sit in - which I think they did as a joke really to burn me basically - but I happened to know the tune (Spidermonkey) and it was fast and had odd time breaks....totally nailed it. So turns out that he extended his southwest summer tour but Smitty had a tour planned with some fusion band he was part of when he was younger (M Base maybe from memory?)

Anyways - I got the gig and toured with Kevin Eubanks. So from there it just sort of bossomed - I played with Bud Shank, Greg Abate, Doug Lawrence, James and eventually got a touring spot with Al Dimeola on the World Sinfonia III. During all this heavy jazz stuff - I also played with a lot of more contemporary music - like The Ionics and even played the Warp Tour with a band called Cold Fusion.

So I was in it - this was like 2001-2006 ish.

But then I met my wife and we started a familiy...and it became clear to me that having a family and being a touring musician is one of the hardest things to do - and I came from a broken home and didn't want to NOT to be present for my daugthers.

So I kind of packed it all up and started a business. There was transition period and the emotional pain of turning down gigs...but for a long time I started this business and support my family and was able to do things like take them to Europe and go sailing on the pacific, etc... really provide them a quality life.


So now my oldest is a Junior in college and already becoming this in demand architect and my youngest is almost out of school - I've been slowly getting back into it more full time. I started a jazz trio with this freak of nature good horn player - and we added an MC at this festival we played and that turned into a whole jazz/hip hop band that got featured on NPR a few years ago and just got WINGS and this year we had TONS of shows planned in all these major venues, and signed with a great label for some licensing deals to have our music on some Netflix shows, etc.

All that then COVID haha. (Luckily though we've been lots of live streams and working on the licensing and still have venues doing neat things like paying us half and re-scheduling for later dates, etc. etc.)

So anyways - my business allows me to work from home or on tour, etc. so that's totally fine and the past couple of years I've been transitioning back into being a full time musician (Which everyone else in the band is....so yea - I pay for a lot of meals when we gig haha).

Also just got a contract with Columbia records to be the drummer and a producer for this show and tour that features indigenous musicians (I'm half spanish half peruvian).

Also I'm on the board for "The San Juan Jazz Society" which is a non-profit that helps artists in the Four Corners area - we built a nice outdoor venue down here and host weekly jazz jams (Or DID) and concerts / workshops on one saturday a month - and since COVID we've started filming a live concert series with musicians from the South West called "The Heart Space Live" - the heart space being the name of our venue.

And finally I'm a co-founder of another non-profit called "The Indigenous Youth Arts Education Foundation" that does two things: Promotes arts to indigenous populations that might not otherwise be exposed to it...so taking musicians to cool area and populations and that promotes Indigenous artists to more mainstream venues. We've done workshops and concerts now for like 30k or more students.
 
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