So I've never seen this written this way.

konaboy

Pioneer Member
so a couple months ago I posted I wanted to start working on Fool in the Rain by Zeppelin. Well life get's in the way and I'm finally starting on it. Had some great tips and links when I started the thread. One of the links was a transcription and as I looked at it I thought to myself. The shuffle is in 1/8 note triplets with an 1/8 note rest on the &. I've never seen it documented the way it is on this transcription in the key at the top. Anyone else?

 

BillRayDrums

Gold Member
so a couple months ago I posted I wanted to start working on Fool in the Rain by Zeppelin. Well life get's in the way and I'm finally starting on it. Had some great tips and links when I started the thread. One of the links was a transcription and as I looked at it I thought to myself. The shuffle is in 1/8 note triplets with an 1/8 note rest on the &. I've never seen it documented the way it is on this transcription in the key at the top. Anyone else?

They wrote it that way to infer the "swing" or "rounded" 8th notes in the shuffle. Basically says "Play these 8th notes as if they were the first and last notes of the triplet".
 

konaboy

Pioneer Member
They wrote it that way to infer the "swing" or "rounded" 8th notes in the shuffle. Basically says "Play these 8th notes as if they were the first and last notes of the triplet".
Ahh thanks, threw me as I hasn't seen that written like that before.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
They wrote it that way to infer the "swing" or "rounded" 8th notes in the shuffle. Basically says "Play these 8th notes as if they were the first and last notes of the triplet".
^ This.

Pretty common in sheet music for jazz.

Many times in jazz or shuffles, no one ever plays the middle note of the triplet, so they write this this way to save time.

Although it's silly for Fool in the Rain because the ghost notes in the middle of the triplet can't be written.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
Bill's right, but it is kind of a weird way to write that song. I'd think they'd write it as triplets, or in 12/8-- not least because the groove is full of triplets they haven't included in their transcription. In general I feel like, on this kind of shuffle, the triplets should be written out. Maybe that's just my own thing...
 

konaboy

Pioneer Member
^ This.

Pretty common in sheet music for jazz.

Many times in jazz or shuffles, no one ever plays the middle note of the triplet, so they write this this way to save time.

Although it's silly for Fool in the Rain because the ghost notes in the middle of the triplet can't be written.

Yeah and that's what I was trying to figure out, where the ghost notes fit with it written like that. Did some more searching and found 8t written in triplets with the ghost notes. Just made more sense to me written out with the triplets I guess
 

sumdrumguy

Senior Member
Yeah and that's what I was trying to figure out, where the ghost notes fit with it written like that. Did some more searching and found 8t written in triplets with the ghost notes. Just made more sense to me written out with the triplets I guess
Acording to Bernard Purdie, "Don't worry about them ghost notes. They're nothing but rebounds." :)
 

Jankowske

Senior Member
In school band we had many pieces with a triplet beat that were notated that way. That transcription is kinda pointless without the ghost notes, though.

Acording to Bernard Purdie, "Don't worry about them ghost notes. They're nothing but rebounds." :)
Best video ever.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Wouldn't dotted eighth notes serve the same purpose?

The ghosts obviously wouldn't be there so it's useless for "Fool" but I'd still like some confirmation. Wouldn't dotted eights be easier to write?
 

Jankowske

Senior Member
But...but...that would make it 12/8! Or 6/4?

Actually I think you could easily notate the ghost notes that way, but it might be misleading as to where the "beat" is. Maybe.

My Joe Bergamini version is a mess of rests and triplet brackets and it's perfect.
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
I think it's confusing and, quite frankly, wrong to write a cut-time shuffle that way. But yes, anyone familiar with reading jazz is well-acquainted with the the "swung" notes being written as eighths that way.
 
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