Snare with natural reverb....

JohnnySomersett

Senior Member
Hey, been a while since I've posted here... been too busy playing to talk about it! hahaha. But, I have a question that I need some pointing in the right direction.

I use a 14x5 Black Beauty as my main snare and, well, we all know what they sound like (awesome) but I for a while used to run a side snare, either a 10" or 12" for a high pop. However, the music I play has shifted a bit and now I want a different sound coming from my left side.

Now... basically I want a snare I can tune low and loose and get the MOST ring / sustain possible out of it - almost like it has its own built in reverb effect. The BB has a nice ring to it because of the brass shell and unmuffled heads but I want something that just goes DUUSH!HHHHHHHHHhhhhhhhhhhhh.........

Years and years ago I briefly played a borrowed Premier Heavy Rock Nine which was a massive 14x9 brass monster that had that thing a bit, unfortunately that's long gone and they're rare. Plus, still not enough tail to the note.

So, do you know what I mean? If you do, any suggestions?
 

Red Menace

Platinum Member
My friend, it sounds like you're after a the wonderful tones that can only found in a deep snare. I would look into the Ludwig 14x8 Black magic. Or resident snare junkie Zardoss owns one. If you're willing to stray away from brass you could also score a wood marching snare put a strainer and buttplate on it. I went this route with a 14x10, it tunes up very nicely but when I loosen it up a little it deliverers a lovely, low tone that just can't be replicated with a shallow snare.

Other options would be the 14x7 Yamaha Brass. Keep in mind that you can really tune any snare to sustain longer if that's the sound you're after.
 
I picked up a 14 x 8 Mapex Black Panther Fat Cat and it sounds huge. I have a double ply head on it which lowers the pitch slightly. I'd definitely recommend it.
Ultimately, you're probably looking for something 8" deep, it just depends if you want metal or wood.
 

JohnnySomersett

Senior Member
Im not sure they're gonna have that overly extended reverberation I'm looking for. Like...2 seconds of resonance! Like how a big tight unmuffled kick or floor tom with single plys has a fat long note or that 'bouncing ball' / cavern sound

Ergh, it's hard to put into words really.

Imagine you put hall reverb on a snare in a DAW...but in real life (without a hall obviously)


Maybe just a really deep steel snare with single ply heads tuned to the same pitch is the best I can hope to get
 

bigiainw

Gold Member
I honestly think you're looking for something that might not exist acoustically. Have you considered electronics?
 

JohnnySomersett

Senior Member
I honestly think you're looking for something that might not exist acoustically. Have you considered electronics?


I think you're probably right...I was just hoping someone somewhere might have come across something ridiculously long-noted in their sonic travels.

I'm not delving into electronics, I tried that once and it wasn't my scene.

Cheers anyway
 

markdrum

Silver Member
I tried one of the Mapex Black Panther "Heritage" snares and that boy resonated for a good 30 seconds. It had a nice tone with a perfect blend of overtones. i was in a store so the acoustics weren't perfect but it's definitely on my radar. The one in question is a maple shelled 6.5" with a single ply head. It's definitely worth considering.
 

Soupy

Silver Member
If you tune the batter on a snare much lower than people normally do, more like a tom, you will get more head sustain/resonance, which will give you more snare sustain. You won't have a lot of rebound, and I don't know if the sound is what you want, but it's an idea.

In a more normal sound, I get a pretty full, fat sound with lots of snare from an Acrolite with G2 over hazy 300, tuned medium-low, and 42 strand wires tensioned on the loose side.
 

sonnygrabber

Senior Member
Have a listen to the new Jack White album. His snare sound is in no way my cup of tea but it seems to go on a good long time. I think he plays a Luddy of some sort.
 

wloeb

Senior Member
try tuning the bottom head relatively loose, not super loose but less than normal. Net loosen the snares all the way. Then tighten the snares until they sound right. The next step is to tighten the snares more while hitting the drum. After a little bit you'll hear a reverb type effect when playing at moderate volume (snare will choke if played hard)
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I thought all snares from the 80's had reverb built in...?
They did. I have one. One of my favorite bands, Living Colour, the drums sounded so much better live than on their first studio albums. But all albums back then sounded like that too.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Maybe just a really deep steel snare with single ply heads tuned to the same pitch is the best I can hope to get
Snare wires put the brakes on even the most resonant of drum setups. I know gary at WACD is working on a neat internal snare wire that will allow a degree more reso head sustain. Aside from that, try a fairly deep drum with concert/orchestral wires. Typically only a few strands, & with light tension, they will permit a longer note. A drum without snare beds will help too. I have such a beast here, & it can do low & long better than anything I've encountered.
 
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