Snare Drum Angle: Am I Hindering Myself?

Icetech

Gold Member
For me, tilt or not only matters cause it messes up my stick rebound.. for snare i like flat, toms tilted towards me, if i get them off a bit i find it annoying as it changes how my sticks rebound.. other than that.. meh.. do whatever:)
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
**This is a thread purely for conversation. I am in no way trying to insinuate that having your snare angled has a negative implication on skill level. I’m just going off what I’ve noticed**

I am a fairly new drummer. I have only been playing for about a year and a half.

I’ve tried leveling out my snare, but always end up tilting it towards me.

I’ve watched great drummers start out with their snare drum tilted towards them, but then later move on to having it fairly flat as they advance in their playing/career.

From what I’ve seen, it seems that the more advanced the player, the more likely they are to have their snare set flat. Unless, they are known jazz/traditional grip players. In that case the snare is all over the place haha

but for the most part, the snare is flat.

I am beginning to wonder if I am hindering myself and my stroke by getting too used to having the snare tilted towards me?

I am getting worried that I am going to permanently mess up my left hand technique.

interested in hearing from others. Thanks

You aren't hindering yourself at all by tilting your snare. Look at guys like Steve Smith and Vinnie Colaiuta. They started out tilting it the way you do. And they were in their prime. They did it that way because they were young and had the muscle and stamina to rock out with the snare that way. Now as they are older they both play with their snares flatter. I think it has more to do with ease of playing rather than technical ability. I could be wrong. But that's my thinking. Getting old sucks. Take it from this aging 59 year old. But I still tilt my snare towards me. Of course, I also suck at the drums.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
It's related to the angle of the dangle of your stick. So some sticks dangle so flat is comfortable others away or towards.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
It's related to the angle of the dangle of your stick. So some sticks dangle so flat is comfortable others away or towards.
"The angle of the dangle is inversely proportional to the heat of the beat" - Beavis
 

organworthyplayer337

Well-known member
I know I am replying to my own thread but I found this vid recently and I think this is an example of a good player with a pretty extreme angle on his snare:
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
You aren't hindering yourself at all by tilting your snare. Look at guys like Steve Smith and Vinnie Colaiuta. They started out tilting it the way you do. And they were in their prime. They did it that way because they were young and had the muscle and stamina to rock out with the snare that way. Now as they are older they both play with their snares flatter. I think it has more to do with ease of playing rather than technical ability. I could be wrong. But that's my thinking. Getting old sucks. Take it from this aging 59 year old. But I still tilt my snare towards me. Of course, I also suck at the drums.

Or that they started playing matched or utilize both grips now.
 

Captain Bash

Silver Member
It’s perfectly possible to check the flatness of snare drum at a gig, it simply requires the positioning of 1 pint of barrel matured water, hops, and malt placed dead centre - check level and then remove by ingestion. Repeat procedure until either snare is level to the floor or you are on the floor.

I am a proponent of slight tilt toward the player, but then again 90% of my playing is matched grip and I tend to only play 4 specific locations on a 14 wide snare. Ergonomics matter when you are playing continuously for a couple of hours, but don’t matter quite so much if it’s a 30 min whizz bang.

Each to their own.
 
I know I am replying to my own thread but I found this vid recently and I think this is an example of a good player with a pretty extreme angle on his snare:
This is a very individual approach - it wouldn't work for me, but who cares if it works for him? :) He sits a tad low and very far away from the snare. The left hand is at times nearly in French grip and between his legs. Maybe he plays like that to make room for loud strokes with the left hand. Personally, I would move the hi hat away from me and sit closer to the snare.
 

Al Strange

Well-known member
It’s perfectly possible to check the flatness of snare drum at a gig, it simply requires the positioning of 1 pint of barrel matured water, hops, and malt placed dead centre - check level and then remove by ingestion. Repeat procedure until either snare is level to the floor or you are on the floor.
I think you might be on to something here…presumably this methodology would also work with an apple based beverage? :unsure: 😂 (y)
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
Or that they started playing matched or utilize both grips now.
Actually, I think both of them have returned to playing mostly traditional grip based on what I saw when I caught them live.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
Don't worry as much about the drum.. The STICK should hit flat.. throne height makes a huge difference.. If you sit REALLY low, i'd say angled toms make more sense... I sit high so they are usually flatter as I am "over" the kit more.

If your stick isn't hitting flat, it's causing less rebound and working against you. At the end of the day do what works best for you and your comfort.
 
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