Smart Pedals?

Walfin

Member
HAH, I remember stumbling across that site a year or two ago. I wonder how anyone could buy such an expensive pedal from website that looks so cheap. Do we really need more gimmicky pedals? I mean there's been some that use magnets others with compressed air..

Especially since you can play with your heel on conventional pedals aswell. Also I love the fact that he's also selling a book and a video to show how to use the pedal for an extra fee.

And OH, WOW some of the books also come with a hand written signature of the inventor. Really, there's nothing more I'd rather have than a signature from someone I've never heard of. REALLY!

But I guess it could be mildly entertaining to try them out.
 

maddrummr

Platinum Member
Yea those pedals and the site look cheesy.

its probably some guy living out of his moms basement



not that thats wrong or anything
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
HAH, I remember stumbling across that site a year or two ago. I wonder how anyone could buy such an expensive pedal from website that looks so cheap. Do we really need more gimmicky pedals? I mean there's been some that use magnets others with compressed air..
I agree. Innovation is dumb. The pedal evolved as much as it needed to when they developed the wood block contraption in 1903. This whole stuff with steel, aluminum, plastic pedals, replacing rope tuning with mechanical lugs, tubular hardware, racks, plastic heads, ply shells and don't even get me started on double pedals.

Well, you might disagree if you actually play any of those things, and think it's a stupid gimmick if you don't play them. That's the difference between innovation and gimmickry.
I try to keep an open mind about stuff, even if I never plan to play it.
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
I figure if they were so great... Why dont other companies make them?
Uh, there's this thing called a Patent.

Plus, other drum companies are slow to adapt to change. People buy millions of foot pedals with the current configuration, so why change anything if it's profitable? Plus, you'd have immediate fistfights break out over if it works, how well it works, if it's a cheat, if it's harder, if it's worth they money, if it shortens life expectancy and if it contributes to global warming.

It's not worth it for the big manufacturers to radically innovate and re-invent something. Hell, they're still making 99 percent of their shells the same way there were 150 years ago.

So most people buy the most common, take-no-chances, run-of-the-mill mass-produced standardized stuff and radical innovation is left to quirky pioneers with a good vision and a bad Web site.
 
F

fourstringdrums

Guest
Uh, there's this thing called a Patent.

Plus, other drum companies are slow to adapt to change. People buy millions of foot pedals with the current configuration, so why change anything if it's profitable? Plus, you'd have immediate fistfights break out over if it works, how well it works, if it's a cheat, if it's harder, if it's worth they money, if it shortens life expectancy and if it contributes to global warming.

It's not worth it for the big manufacturers to radically innovate and re-invent something. Hell, they're still making 99 percent of their shells the same way there were 150 years ago.

So most people buy the most common, take-no-chances, run-of-the-mill mass-produced standardized stuff and radical innovation is left to quirky pioneers with a good vision and a bad Web site.
Not only that, but if it's a product such as a bass pedal that requires that you alter or change your technique all together, I would imagine that not many people are too keene on having to do that.
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
Not only that, but if it's a product such as a bass pedal that requires that you alter or change your technique all together, I would imagine that not many people are too keene on having to do that.
Not unless there's sufficient marketing behind it and the price is low enough. Double bass pedals, for example, are a huge investment in time and effort to learn a new technique and very few people play them well - but they sell like hotcakes.
 

Walfin

Member
I agree. Innovation is dumb. The pedal evolved as much as it needed to when they developed the wood block contraption in 1903. This whole stuff with steel, aluminum, plastic pedals, replacing rope tuning with mechanical lugs, tubular hardware, racks, plastic heads, ply shells and don't even get me started on double pedals.

Well, you might disagree if you actually play any of those things, and think it's a stupid gimmick if you don't play them. That's the difference between innovation and gimmickry.
I try to keep an open mind about stuff, even if I never plan to play it.
Innovation isn't dumb. The way this "revolutionary heel driven bass drum pedal" comes off, seems to be though. It's a sad but true fact that marketing plays a major role in all product development. And that site sure can't sell it. The whole site looks like a bad commercial on the home shopping network, and the pedal itself looks real cheap and uncomfortable. That's what I meant by gimmicky. Would you drop 400 dollars for that pedal just based on what you've seen there?

I mean, I came across it in the first place, because I was googling for a heel driven pedal. I was curious to find out if such things existed, and this is what I found :(

Yeah, I could change my mind if tried it, but then again so could you. If the pedal was so fantastic, surely someone would have managed to test it and spread the word.
 

Wavelength

Platinum Member
It amuses me when he describes using normal pedals as "torture". I gather the pedal's inventor has so bad foot technique that he can't even spell the word correctly.
 

maddrummr

Platinum Member
Ok so i tried simulating how this pedal would work compared to the regular pedal.

For me, my leg is outstreatched a little so it feels relaxed. In order to get relaxed with this technique it seems you would have to make your leg at a 90 degree angle and your bass drum would be like right up to your foot. To me this doesnt seem comfortible at all.

just my thoughts
 
F

fourstringdrums

Guest
Not unless there's sufficient marketing behind it and the price is low enough. Double bass pedals, for example, are a huge investment in time and effort to learn a new technique and very few people play them well - but they sell like hotcakes.
I don't think of the double pedal as something that took alot of experimenting technique wise before people felt comfortable with it, not like this pedal. A double bass pedal just meant doing the same thing with your left foot that you do with your right, and in some cases using motions you might have already used on the hi-hat anyway.
 

hauk

Silver Member
It amuses me when he describes using normal pedals as "torture". I gather the pedal's inventor has so bad foot technique that he can't even spell the word correctly.
eh.. hate to bring something off topic in here, but if that's not how you spell torture, how do you?
 

drozzy

Senior Member
I would like to try one of these. Whenever i practice sans-pedals i always use my heels to replicate the bass pedal.

However the cost... and lack of decent webpage has me thinking differently.
 

dea

Senior Member
Very interesting concept.

However, how does one tackle the heel-toe problem? My first thought was to sit this pedal next to your hi-hat. Place the balls of your foot on the hi-hat like normal, set your foot at an angle to get your heel on this new pedal. That could work(?) This definitely deserves a looksie.
 

SLEEPY BRiGHT EYEZ

Platinum Member
That thing looks like a bear trap. I'm not putting my foot in it. It keeps your foot in a position that would be like you wearing high heels... :)
 

d.c.drummer

Platinum Member
That actuall made me i use my heel almost exclusively but that bedal takes awway all the toe options and even some of the heel options.
 
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