Silver Sealer

Matt Scales

Junior Member
Yes this is exactly what I was talking about... you can see very clearly the distinct differences in these 3 paint finishes, obviously different paints have been used, so to say the silver sealer formula has never changed is just marketing BS!

The 1st shell is the modern 'flat' silver/grey finish, and looks more like a primer coat than a top coat.
The 2nd shell is more like the original but still has a flatter finish and an almost blue tint to it, still has a hint of primer about it.
The 3rd shell is classic sealer in a Jasper shell I believe, this is the true original Gretsch formula and appears far more metallic silver with a glossier finish.

Let's face it though, it's just silver paint, anything will do if these 3 shells are anything to go by !;)
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I'm stripping my drums down and sending them off to an auto factory to have painted inside/out with a baked on car finish (none of the local paint jobs). I'll just need to polish them up with car wax on occasion. I wonder if someone has tried this-I'm pretty sure someone has tried this.
 

Trip McNealy

Gold Member
I can't imagine that over the decades of EPA regulations and changes and whatnot that Gretsch has had to reformulate their Silver Sealer paint composition. Nonetheless I'm sure the paint application still adds value to the sonic properties, much like Neil Peart had several of his shells "Fibra-fied" on the inner ply.
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
Yes this is exactly what I was talking about... you can see very clearly the distinct differences in these 3 paint finishes, obviously different paints have been used, so to say the silver sealer formula has never changed is just marketing BS!

The 1st shell is the modern 'flat' silver/grey finish, and looks more like a primer coat than a top coat.
The 2nd shell is more like the original but still has a flatter finish and an almost blue tint to it, still has a hint of primer about it.
The 3rd shell is classic sealer in a Jasper shell I believe, this is the true original Gretsch formula and appears far more metallic silver with a glossier finish.

Let's face it though, it's just silver paint, anything will do if these 3 shells are anything to go by !;)
Let me play devil's advocate. The lighting is different in each of the photos, taken by different cameras in different environments. And the ages of each drum could be different as well. This all could combine to give the appearance of a different color.

Color grading/accuracy is a huge issue for photographers, the cameras themselves could account for the differences in color.
 

Tamaefx

Silver Member
I've seen old gretsch kits, and the silver sealer is better applied nowadays for sure, smoother. Maybe it's a tad flatter, true.
In my opinion a shiny and strong coat inside the shell is a good thing for resonance, gray or not.
 
Last edited:

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
It's not even paint it's actual silver leaf slowly added to interior by little green men-hence the secrecy. No worries the silver doesn't come from earth and use up our valuable resources. Now you know why the USA customs cost so much-alien silver which has some unique impurities-not of this earth-giving it it's magical powers. It's not really the silver but the minuscule alien metal impurity that does the trick. I'm sending this in to a Drum magazine. How I was abducted by aliens and serendipitously I discover Gretsch secret to silver sealer.
 

incrementalg

Gold Member
Big Gretsch fan here and I love the look of silver sealer. But, my suspicion is that it all started as a way to cover less than stellar looking inner plies. It might very well contribute to the twangy Gretsch sound though.
 

RickP

Gold Member
I can't imagine that over the decades of EPA regulations and changes and whatnot that Gretsch has had to reformulate their Silver Sealer paint composition. Nonetheless I'm sure the paint application still adds value to the sonic properties, much like Neil Peart had several of his shells "Fibra-fied" on the inner ply.
It is Vibrafied not Fibrafied .
A thin layer of Fiberglass was sprayed to the interiors of his Tama and Ludwig drums . He stopped having his sets vibrafied when he went to DW.
 

markdrum

Silver Member
It could possibly be an OSHA thing as well. I worked summers in a furniture manufacturing plant when I was a munchkin and there were areas where they had spray booths that were sealed off.
 

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
As a drumsmith, as long as the wood looks good, I use sanding sealer on the inside of shells I want to seal up. If the inside is bad, I’ll use sanding sealer, then aluminum paint in the can.
I have gone as far as using Fleck Stone on the inside and covering that with silver paint. It makes for a nice texture to hide repairs and the color is good as well.
 
Top