Silent stroke heads or ekit.

harrisal21

Junior Member
What would be more beneficial for practicing and what do you guys use? Buy an ekit or just get an old beater set and put silent stroke heads on it and get zildjian l80 which I do have an old cb kit I can use.
 
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toonamike

Member
I had a Yamaha DTX kit for a few years. While it was fun to play, I don't think it did much for my chops. It just felt unnatural.

I have Silent Stroke heads and L80s on my Ludwig Classic Maple kit and I enjoy playing much more on that setup.

The cymbals are actually quite good. I seem to want to overplay the Silent Stroke heads; I guess I'm trying to get them to make more sound. I'm not too fond of the Silent Stroke on the bass drum. It feels too mushy, even with the provided slam patch.
 

Jasperdrummer

Junior Member
In my opinion. E-kits aren't great for practising purposes. Even the high end stuff from Roland. (Sometimes they're your only choice though.) I've got a TD-30.

Why? For it's price, it's a good tool...but the transition from it to an acoustic can take some time getting used to. Dynamics & ghost notes are never 100% on the E-kits especially on the hi-hat. Sure you can adjust the sensitivity, but even still.

A lot of the time for me personally when I think I've nailed a particular chop on an E-kit...test it out on the acoustic & it doesn't sound as good. You are limited with dynamics on the E-kits. Completely just my opinion though, but I'd go with the Silent Stroke Heads.

To add, I use a DW Smart Practice kit more than my TD-30 & the transition from the practice kit to the acoustic set is much smoother, at least for me.
 

beatdat

Senior Member
Notwithstanding their other shortcomings (it me be just me, but I swear I can always hear the slightest delay when I play one), e-kits are hard to configure. If you're going to have a practice "kit", you want one set up the way your drums are, so a modified kit is the way to go.

In terms of practice cymbals, to me L80s are like playing real cymbals while wearing IEMs. The feel of them is undeniable, and you can't ask anything more from them in terms of sound - I think they're the closest things to real cymbals when it comes to low volume solutions. I can't say enough about them, except that I've heard they've also started making L80 China and splash cymbals (what else can you ask for?!).

But, search around for silent stroke head options. I've had Remo Silent Stroke heads, and (while quiet for sure) they were unnatural feeling (far too much bounce). I didn't mind them, but I prefer a Gibraltar kick drum practice pad and a few well placed practice pads instead. There are other alternatives, each with their own pros and cons, so take your time to find what you like. I've heard the Aquarian Superpads are worth looking into. Either way, whatever you decide on for "skins", make sure you check out the L80s.
 

Row

Junior Member
I will also recommend the Aquarian Superpads with the Zildjian L80 cymbals, or at least 1 superpad for the snare.

In my experience the Remo silent strokes will sand your bearing edges so get a beat up cheap kit if you are willing to use those.

The e-kits are really fun but I won't recommend any e-kit for practice, ever. The reason is that there is a thing your brain does when you hit the pad you hear the sound but you can actually associate that sound with the "fake" surface you are hitting, so a sharp wood block sound will feel more like hitting a hard wood block, and similar that softer sounds will feel softer. You will end up over/under compensating for these small discrepancies between sound and feel and volume, and feel is so important. This will lead to poor technique.
 

justadrummer

Junior Member
I have a great rehearsal room in the basement of my home. Our house was built in 1910 and has a two foot thick sand stone foundation. Although you can tell someone is playing music from outside, the volume level is very low. If my wife is on our second or third floor, she can't even tell that I'm practicing.

However... We have been involved in animal rescue for fifteen years, in particular the rescue of "Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers". We foster, do transport and currently have three Wheatens that we've adopted. One on our current dogs hates drums. (And bass, and guitar...) She stands in the kitchen or dining room and barks into the AC grates. So now I'm looking at silent practice options.

This past January I visited a good friend of mine on Long Island. He is using a full set of the Aquarian Superpads and a set of Zildjian low volume cymbals. I really liked them a lot. We had not adopted Darby the noise sensitive Wheaten at that point. but now I'm shopping for a low volume practice solution of my own. I've decided that I'm going to order them in the next few weeks. I'll report back with the results.
 

Reggae_Mangle

Silver Member
Have you considered Vic Firth mute pads? I have a set of them on my acoustic kit and they really cut the volume. Of course, on the snare, I have to loosen the springs or you get this really loud rattle.
 

Mustion

Senior Member
In my experience the Remo silent strokes will sand your bearing edges so get a beat up cheap kit if you are willing to use those.
Elaborate please! I have heard this and wondered if it was true, and if anything can be done to avoid it (like cutting out the collar of a regular head to put between the mesh head and the bearing edge)
 

Row

Junior Member
Elaborate please! I have heard this and wondered if it was true, and if anything can be done to avoid it (like cutting out the collar of a regular head to put between the mesh head and the bearing edge)
Wood dust present in every shell and directly over bearing edge after relatively light usage on a high end Pearl kit. Just like those Remo Roland bass drum mesh pads wear down your felt beater very quickly.
 

Mustion

Senior Member
Wood dust present in every shell and directly over bearing edge after relatively light usage on a high end Pearl kit. Just like those Remo Roland bass drum mesh pads wear down your felt beater very quickly.
Yikes. Well I'll be putting them on an old set of Remo Acousticons so I doubt there will be any wood dust :D

And yes, I had an Evans mylar patch (the black, uncoated one) eat up a felt beater recently. Lesson learned.
 

Tommy_D

Platinum Member
I've played silent stroke heads on my PDP Concept Maple and there was no issue with the bearing edges. I cut new edges on the kit, shellacked the interiors and edges and with the silent strokes the shellac had absolutely no signs of wear on the edges when swapping back to mylar heads after 6 months.

I've owned/played ekits, hybrid kits and silent stroke/L80 kits. Overall, my most enjoyable was the ekit. It just worked the best and could do the most. The hybrid required more tinkering to get the settings just right (even though it looked way cooler) and the silent stroke/L80 kit was pretty much a low volume kit that you really couldn't lay in to unless you wanted to risk breaking a cymbal.

I still own all this stuff, but I only have full acoustic kits set up right now. I do want to build my hybrid kit again so I can really wail in to the drums without waking up the neighborhood, but it would require me to take down one of my acoustic kits. I'm not quite prepared for that right now.
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
In my opinion. E-kits aren't great for practising purposes. Even the high end stuff from Roland. (Sometimes they're your only choice though.) I've got a TD-30.

Why? For it's price, it's a good tool...but the transition from it to an acoustic can take some time getting used to. Dynamics & ghost notes are never 100% on the E-kits especially on the hi-hat. Sure you can adjust the sensitivity, but even still.

A lot of the time for me personally when I think I've nailed a particular chop on an E-kit...test it out on the acoustic & it doesn't sound as good. You are limited with dynamics on the E-kits. Completely just my opinion though, but I'd go with the Silent Stroke Heads.

To add, I use a DW Smart Practice kit more than my TD-30 & the transition from the practice kit to the acoustic set is much smoother, at least for me.
I agree. E-Kits are mostly terrible for replicating the feel of real kits. If you play on an e-kit for too long, you'll find your touch, dynamics and velocity will all be out of whack when you switch back to a real kit. Take this from someone who played Rock Band for years. :)

My big issue with ekits is that they come pre-compressed, pre-EQ'd, pre-'boosted'.....the tone quality sounds 'great' no matter how you hit them. That's BAD for learning to play real drums.

You get used to hearing everything sound 'perfect' on an ekit, then get a dose of reality when you go back to a real kit.
 
I’m currently using the Zildjian L-80’s and Remo Silent Strokes. I haven’t had any ‘sanding’ issues with the bearing edges, maybe just lucky. While they are very low volume, the do bounce a bit more than I’d like. I’ll likely be switching over the the Black Holes. That way I’m not having to switch out heads often and retune. They’re pricey though.
 

Mustion

Senior Member
I’m currently using the Zildjian L-80’s and Remo Silent Strokes. I haven’t had any ‘sanding’ issues with the bearing edges, maybe just lucky. While they are very low volume, the do bounce a bit more than I’d like. I’ll likely be switching over the the Black Holes. That way I’m not having to switch out heads often and retune. They’re pricey though.
Has anybody experimented by putting an old head with the hoop removed beneath the mesh head? I wonder if that would eliminate the trampoline feel.
 
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