Shuffle beat

Good Karma

Well-known member
I've always struggled with a shuffle beat so I never really practiced them. The last few weeks I've been forcing myself to try and learn a few different patterns and I'm really starting to enjoy these beats. I'm up to 90 bpm and they still sound clean and in time.
So my question is, what max bpm should I set a goal for myself to play these at. I loaded some of the patterns I've been practicing. Please don't call me a troll, at some point you probably ask the same question.
Thanks for the positive feedback 20200310_155016.jpg
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Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I’ve been playing around with having the shuffle going on all 4 limbs at the same time, so both feet and hands are playing the same pattern. I alternate a measure or two of this with the shuffle pattern from La Grange.

I’d say your next goal should be to be able to play La Grange clean at tempo. That’s what I am sort of aiming for.
 

Good Karma

Well-known member
I’ve been playing around with having the shuffle going on all 4 limbs at the same time, so both feet and hands are playing the same pattern. I alternate a measure or two of this with the shuffle pattern from La Grange.

I’d say your next goal should be to be able to play La Grange clean at tempo. That’s what I am sort of aiming for.
Wow, I just looked that bpm up on the web. Its 160 bpm. Its do able tho. Just going to take time to get to that point.
Thanks
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Wow, I just looked that bpm up on the web. Its 160 bpm. Its do able tho. Just going to take time to get to that point.
Thanks
After posting that, i went downstairs and shuffled for a few minutes. I can’t believe I only discovered shuffles like a year ago. They are way more fun than other beats.
 

Good Karma

Well-known member
After posting that, i went downstairs and shuffled for a few minutes. I can’t believe I only discovered shuffles like a year ago. They are way more fun than other beats.
Yes, I agree. I'm kinda bored with 1/4 & 1/8 beats. This has opened a new door in learning for me. The shuffle fills that go with the patterns I attached are basic but fun to play.
Some start with my weak hand so thats helpful in forcing me to play that way.
 
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force3005

Silver Member
Hi GK. Like most everything with playing drums, keep playing it over and over and keep it clean and in time. Try it at 90 for a few days then go to 94. If it does not feel or sound good drop back down to lets say 86 for a day or so, then try 94. I'll bet you will be surprised.
 

Rock Salad

Junior Member
i got a good one for you. accent the down beats with L and K, and accent the "let"s with R. it is super good to be able to play all notes with all limbs and shift the accents to different parts of the kit. WAY better than speed. (to me)
Oh! and rolling Ta ta Ta ta Ta ta rather than Ta ta ta Ta ta ta breaks it up nicely.
I am a beginner at it too. Big fun
 
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larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Trying to play "La Grange" cleanly will put the white hot spotlight on any weak hand issues.

It's a great strengthening exercise for the weak hand, shuffling on the snare one handed with a nice clean backbeat.

It's that damn accented backbeat that is the killer for me.
 

TMe

Senior Member
Trying to play "La Grange" cleanly will put the white hot spotlight on any weak hand issues.
When I've tried to play that beat with a band, it seemed to put the white hot spotlight on everyone's flaws, not just mine. It seems like it would only work if everyone in the band were shuffling with the same feel, at the same level of competence.

I'm kinda thinking it's more of an advanced technique that would only work well with a very good, and very rehearsed band. No matter how tight the drummer is, if everyone in the band isn't equally tight, it's a train wreck. It seems like an example of how playing with weaker musicians can limit what a person can play. Am I wrong about that?
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
When I've tried to play that beat with a band, it seemed to put the white hot spotlight on everyone's flaws, not just mine. It seems like it would only work if everyone in the band were shuffling with the same feel, at the same level of competence.

I'm kinda thinking it's more of an advanced technique that would only work well with a very good, and very rehearsed band. No matter how tight the drummer is, if everyone in the band isn't equally tight, it's a train wreck. It seems like an example of how playing with weaker musicians can limit what a person can play. Am I wrong about that?
Wrong? Not in my opinion. Really great feeling shuffles played at a high level, requires stringed and other players that understand...and love...and know how...to execute a great shuffle, with the proper dynamics and restraint and authentic-ness....for it to become larger than the sum of the parts...
As always, the drummer REALLY has to get the shuffle, love the shuffle, and be able to execute the shuffle, for them to have any chance at all.
 
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Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
When I've tried to play that beat with a band, it seemed to put the white hot spotlight on everyone's flaws, not just mine. It seems like it would only work if everyone in the band were shuffling with the same feel, at the same level of competence.

I'm kinda thinking it's more of an advanced technique that would only work well with a very good, and very rehearsed band. No matter how tight the drummer is, if everyone in the band isn't equally tight, it's a train wreck. It seems like an example of how playing with weaker musicians can limit what a person can play. Am I wrong about that?
I agree with this from experience!!!

And to Good Karma, check out the song "The Wanderer" for a good mid tempo shuffle to work on!!!
 

mrthirsty

Junior Member
I think that I'm starting to get a handle on shuffle patterns and I see notations like that and its very humbling :-/
Don't feel bad, it took me YEARS to get a handle on that pattern, I still work on it to this day. FYI I ripped it off from a Simon Phillips soundcheck video on youtube.
 

mrthirsty

Junior Member
Trying to play "La Grange" cleanly will put the white hot spotlight on any weak hand issues.

It's a great strengthening exercise for the weak hand, shuffling on the snare one handed with a nice clean backbeat.

It's that damn accented backbeat that is the killer for me.
I just watched the ZZ Top documentary on Netflix and they played this song. Frank Beard was playing quarter notes on the hats and the shuffle pattern on the snare, is that how he did it on the original?
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I just watched the ZZ Top documentary on Netflix and they played this song. Frank Beard was playing quarter notes on the hats and the shuffle pattern on the snare, is that how he did it on the original?
Yes except the quarters were on the ride on the original. The quintessential Texas Shuffle, quarters on the ride and bass, shuffled snare with backbeat.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Yes except the quarters were on the ride on the original. The quintessential Texas Shuffle, quarters on the ride and bass, shuffled snare with backbeat.
I’m not sure, but I thought that shuffle was on the kick too. At least that’s how I’ve been practicing it.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
This is a cool halftime and straight shuffle for building your left hand.
I’ve been messing with going back and forth between halftime shuffle and regular shuffle like that for a few months. I haven’t done those extra ghost notes on the third note, though. That’s going to take me several weeks to get going. Oh well.
 

TMe

Senior Member
...I thought that shuffle was on the kick too.
I'm talking through my hat, here, but I think Rockers tend to shuffle with the kick drum and Blues guys tend to play quarters on the kick. Anything more than quarters on the kick tends to muddy the sound too much for most songs.

A shuffled kick works for slower Rock tunes played in 6/8, where every 1/8 note has equal value (whereas a Blues shuffle is usually a bit asymmetric and has more of a broken 1/8 feel). Triumph's version of Rocky Mountain Way might be a good example of a Rock shuffle. It's more stiff and symmetrical than most Blues shuffles, almost like a quick waltz.
 
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