Show us your Four Piece Kits.

Jasta 11

Well-known member
Thanks!

You can kind of tell from this pic. The rack tom & snare are on a DW V-Clamp with Double-ball L-arms. I angled them so they wouldn't be in each other's way.
The tom has a RIMS-type mount & the snare was direct-to-shell.

The main goal here was portability & quick on-and-off stage. I could pre-set this up off stage & in literally 3 trips, I was up and ready.

The guy who bought it needed a small, backline kit for his studio & this was perfect. So I knew it was going to a good home.
great idea mounting the snare and tom on a single stand. Also, is it a wrap or were the shells painted that color?
 

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
great idea mounting the snare and tom on a single stand. Also, is it a wrap or were the shells painted that color?
Painted. I'm not a fan of wraps & I let the wood grain be seen here.
I was enamored by Gretsch's Detroit Motor City blue on their Renown kit years ago & tried to duplicate the color here. As I play in the rockabilly scene, this color is everywhere & fits with our look. ;)
 

Jasta 11

Well-known member
Painted. I'm not a fan of wraps & I let the wood grain be seen here.
I was enamored by Gretsch's Detroit Motor City blue on their Renown kit years ago & tried to duplicate the color here. As I play in the rockabilly scene, this color is everywhere & fits with our look. ;)
I have been thinking about painting one of my kits, maybe with a flat chalk or milk paint in a color similar to that. Very cool.
 

Quai34

Junior Member

sumdrumguy

Senior Member
Hi, funny, I know this Guy, he's the one who gave me some ideas about my new band, we were supposed to practice one time with him when when we startedd but he had to leave for a tour for 4 months...He has a very good website, can't remember the name though...
Hi Phillipe! Yeah, that was a few years back now.

I noticed at least one other Winnipeger here on DWF. Maybe others lurking as well.

Stay safe (y)
 

Quai34

Junior Member
Hi Phillipe! Yeah, that was a few years back now.

I noticed at least one other Winnipeger here on DWF. Maybe others lurking as well.

Stay safe (y)
Hey, great, I don't play drums, well, just doing it for Fun but I invested in drums and cymbals as you could see in my signature...But this year, with Covid, nothing...And we had so many contacts after the wedding show, where we played during the two days...Well, it's the same for everyone, stay safe you too...
 

jasz

Junior Member
Yeah. I actually started off right "open" handed 15 years ago, but later realized stuff never felt natural in regards to playing cymbals and toms on the right side via shifting hands.

Switching over to a left handed setup felt right at home and stuff legitimately started to make sense. The only real issue was footwork and I'd argue I still struggle to this day. But its a price I'm willing to pay for everything else clicking with ease.

Might end up buying a double pedal with a solid transfer link and figuring out something that way via aux hats. Havent played a double pedal in 10 years.
 

InATexasStateOfMind

Active member
Yeah. I actually started off right "open" handed 15 years ago, but later realized stuff never felt natural in regards to playing cymbals and toms on the right side via shifting hands.

Switching over to a left handed setup felt right at home and stuff legitimately started to make sense. The only real issue was footwork and I'd argue I still struggle to this day. But its a price I'm willing to pay for everything else clicking with ease.

Might end up buying a double pedal with a solid transfer link and figuring out something that way via aux hats. Havent played a double pedal in 10 years.
Interesting. So many interesting paths that lefties take when they start. I wonder if more lefties give up than righties in the early days of playing. I started 'pure' lefty from the get go but it's always a pain when playing gigs with a shared kit. For me, there is no way around swapping the hihat/snare with the floor tom/ride and playing the rack toms backwards. Happened to me shortly before COVID for a thrash metal gig.
 

jasz

Junior Member
Interesting. So many interesting paths that lefties take when they start. I wonder if more lefties give up than righties in the early days of playing. I started 'pure' lefty from the get go but it's always a pain when playing gigs with a shared kit. For me, there is no way around swapping the hihat/snare with the floor tom/ride and playing the rack toms backwards. Happened to me shortly before COVID for a thrash metal gig.
I think certain left handed people can learn and be trained to play like a right handed player in the traditional cross over hi hat sense, but I think these people limit their skill set at the same time. For me, It just never felt right after hours of playing and practice...

The only struggle I had to endure on a left handed kit was foot orientation and my brain not wanting to adapt. Cymbal positioning and leading left with tom fills makes SO much more sense than on a RH kit.

It's the same case with me for PC gaming back in the mid to late 2000s playing games like counterstrike 1.6... I actually converted over to left hand mouse and never looked back... everything just clicked.. (literally).

So I guess I'm more of a natural "lefty" relative to those that are more ambidextrous. I never thought or intended to play on a left handed kit, but I'm glad I switched over before it was too late. Drumming is way more enjoyable this way.


I can play a right handed kit in a sense that everything would have to be positioned left of the bass drum (inc cymbals). Weird setup :p
 

Elvis

Silver Member
I think certain left handed people can learn and be trained to play like a right handed player in the traditional cross over hi hat sense, but I think these people limit their skill set at the same time. For me, It just never felt right after hours of playing and practice...

The only struggle I had to endure on a left handed kit was foot orientation and my brain not wanting to adapt. Cymbal positioning and leading left with tom fills makes SO much more sense than on a RH kit.

It's the same case with me for PC gaming back in the mid to late 2000s playing games like counterstrike 1.6... I actually converted over to left hand mouse and never looked back... everything just clicked.. (literally).

So I guess I'm more of a natural "lefty" relative to those that are more ambidextrous. I never thought or intended to play on a left handed kit, but I'm glad I switched over before it was too late. Drumming is way more enjoyable this way.


I can play a right handed kit in a sense that everything would have to be positioned left of the bass drum (incl. cymbals). Weird setup :p
I read a newspaper article in the late 1980's that stated left handed people are left handed because the two hemisphere's of the brain are not as clearly defined as they are in right handed people.
The command starts off as "move right hand", but then crosses over to the other side of the brain and you end up moving your left hand.
Basically, left handed people use their whole brain to do the things that right handed people do with half their brain.
At the time the article was written, 28% of the world's population was left handed.

As for playing left footed on the kit, for me, it was completely accidental.
I picked up the drums after I got out of school, so there as no one to show me how.
I put together my first kit using a picture of a drumkit I had on a shirt I got at a concert.
The problem was, the picture showed the front of the kit. I was standing behind the kit when I put it together, so I setup everything the complete opposite.
Took me about a week to realize what I had done and I did try to flip everything around and play right handed, but I had already acclimated to playing lefty and the right footed setup just didn't work for me....and so, the die was cast.

...another one of my kits....

DSCN3017.jpg
 

jasz

Junior Member
I read a newspaper article in the late 1980's that stated left handed people are left handed because the two hemisphere's of the brain are not as clearly defined as they are in right handed people.
The command starts off as "move right hand", but then crosses over to the other side of the brain and you end up moving your left hand.
Basically, left handed people use their whole brain to do the things that right handed people do with half their brain.
At the time the article was written, 28% of the world's population was left handed.

As for playing left footed on the kit, for me, it was completely accidental.
I picked up the drums after I got out of school, so there as no one to show me how.
I put together my first kit using a picture of a drumkit I had on a shirt I got at a concert.
The problem was, the picture showed the front of the kit. I was standing behind the kit when I put it together, so I setup everything the complete opposite.
Took me about a week to realize what I had done and I did try to flip everything around and play right handed, but I had already acclimated to playing lefty and the right footed setup just didn't work for me....and so, the die was cast.

...another one of my kits....
I would argue that it depends on the person itself. There's likely a degree of variance between different "left handed" people.

I also think there's a level of dedication required to swap and I do know left handed (writing) people that cannot play on a left handed kits at all and think its impossible.

I mean even for me, It was just waking up and deciding "Hmm maybe I should play left handed", but took a few months of training and figuring things out, but If I were to go back to a "right hand" kit... it still feels VERY unnatural.... So dedicating the time certainly worked out to my advantage. Same argument for switching hands on a computer mouse. Def took a good 3 months there as well!



I think there is justification if you are left handed and feel like you've hit a wall in your playing. :) There's Left handed people like Stewart Copeland that are complete geniuses behind a right handed kit, so it def impacts people differently. My 2c.

Also nice kit!


Here's another from when I got the kit and moved it to a different location. Was on my phone.

 
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InATexasStateOfMind

Active member
I would argue that it depends on the person itself. There's likely a degree of variance between different "left handed" people.

I also think there's a level of dedication required to swap and I do know left handed (writing) people that cannot play on a left handed kits at all and think its impossible.

I mean even for me, It was just waking up and deciding "Hmm maybe I should play left handed", but took a few months of training and figuring things out, but If I were to go back to a "right hand" kit... it still feels VERY unnatural.... So dedicating the time certainly worked out to my advantage. Same argument for switching hands on a computer mouse. Def took a good 3 months there as well!



I think there is justification if you are left handed and feel like you've hit a wall in your playing. :) There's Left handed people like Stewart Copeland that are complete geniuses behind a right handed kit, so it def impacts people differently. My 2c.

Also nice kit!


Here's another from when I got the kit and moved it to a different location. Was on my phone.

Yes! Love that kit. I could sit down and play it just like that all day.
 
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