Show off your Junk (or current setup)

cbphoto

Gold Member

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I'm an art teacher (who happens to be a drummer) and I agree with you 100%. As an art teacher, the only time I feel like I'm at work is when I'm in meetings or doing paperwork. The rest of the time I get to make cool stuff with kids all day.

sweet!!! What is your main medium? Or do you have one? I just don't know how the regular classroom teachers do it...it seems like their whole day is just meetings and paperwork. I sometimes have to sub, and I love subbing in the art room here at school. I am a "frustrated architect"...that was actually my first major in college. I love to draw and design...I hate math and science. Didn't realize how much of that there ws in Architecture in college...I hung for 2 years...got straight A's in the drawing and Arch History stuff, and straight F's in the math and science stuff


1966, except for the 15" floor tom, which I converted from a 70's concert tom.

also sweet...i'll bet they sound great! Have they been yours since day 1?
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Didn't realize how much of that there ws in Architecture in college...I hung for 2 years...got straight A's in the drawing and Arch History stuff, and straight F's in the math and science stuff
Tons of math. Snow loads, wind loads, frost lines, square feet, easements, city codes, etc etc. Love that stuff.

I drew blueprints using AutoCAD for arch/eng firm for almost 9 years until the recession. Plenty of degreed architects dont know how to figure that stuff either. I would love it when I would get plans and the overall dimension is like 20'-0", but the inside string comes out to 18'-6". Where did the other 1'-6" go? Lots of times they just let me fix it accordingly instead of figuring it out themselves.

I miss that job.
 

acsunda

Junior Member
sweet!!! What is your main medium? Or do you have one? I just don't know how the regular classroom teachers do it...it seems like their whole day is just meetings and paperwork. I sometimes have to sub, and I love subbing in the art room here at school. I am a "frustrated architect"...that was actually my first major in college. I love to draw and design...I hate math and science. Didn't realize how much of that there ws in Architecture in college...I hung for 2 years...got straight A's in the drawing and Arch History stuff, and straight F's in the math and science stuff




also sweet...i'll bet they sound great! Have they been yours since day 1?

If I have a main medium, it's painting, but I tend to dabble in all sorts of stuff. I've even begun dabbling in blacksmithing. You know, even the drum restorations and conversions I've been doing lately are using similar skills. One of the things I try to teach my middle schoolers is to ignore the artificial barriers between art, craft, and vocational skills. Kids will be like "I'm no good at art, but I like to build things or work on cars." To me they're the same thing, when you get down to it. Weather you're painting, woodworking, or fixing a car (or designing buildings), these are all creative endeavors using your hands and tools. Sorry, didn't mean to get on my soapbox, lol.

And no, I bought these Slingerlands recently on Guitar Center for $600. They were pretty beat up and the original white satin flame finish was wearing thin in a lot of places. So I rewrapped them and fixed them up.
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
And the answer is Grease
Tons of math. Snow loads, wind loads, frost lines, square feet, easements, city codes, etc etc. Love that stuff.

I drew blueprints using AutoCAD for arch/eng firm for almost 9 years until the recession. Plenty of degreed architects dont know how to figure that stuff either. I would love it when I would get plans and the overall dimension is like 20'-0", but the inside string comes out to 18'-6". Where did the other 1'-6" go? Lots of times they just let me fix it accordingly instead of figuring it out themselves.

I miss that job.
I'll jump in, I have no formal training but love talking about architecture. The other 1'6" in your example is due to shrinkage lol. Seriously it is probably either the wall thickness(es) or dripline depending on the building.
My job as a commercial real estate broker primarily involves office and medical office buildings. In the multi tenant office leasing world the difference between rentable and usable square feet is the load factor (also called common area factor or loss factor), which includes all 'common areas' outside a tenant's suite, areas such as corridors/hallways, restrooms, elevators, lobbies, electrical or mechanical rooms, stairways, etc. Can also include exterior areas under the drip line, and outside corridors as well. I've seen common area factors range from about 12% on the low end to nearly 25%. And BOMA standards set the rules for how buildings are measured, including such things as perimeter walls (from the inside of the glass vs outside of the building's skin). Most people outside that world neither ask nor understand this, tenants just want to know 'how much is the rent'? Unless they are measuring individual rooms for furniture and discover that a 14 x12 office is actually 13'4" x 11' 6" and they wonder why their mahogany credenza won't fit haha.
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
I make very little money, but money is not the root of happiness in my world...getting to be 100% immersed in music is
So a wise man once said "The love of money is the root of all evil." Your sentiment is so true. In my next life if I ever get to retire from the rat race I am going to burn my button downs, donate my dress pants, convert my shiny shoes to door stops and open a used drum shop so I can wear a t-shirt, shorts and flip flops and be immersed in music all day. It could even be polka, just so long as it's music. I have to keep my office door closed most of the time at work so can keep it playing when I'm not on the phone trynna get some elusive deal done (right now listening to Gilchrist). Maybe I'm just burned out but I'm thinking there's got to be something else.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I'll jump in, I have no formal training but love talking about architecture. The other 1'6" in your example is due to shrinkage lol. Seriously it is probably either the wall thickness(es) or dripline depending on the building.
No, the outside dimension is the overall measurement of the inner string. For example, the inner string might read 10'-0", 2'-6", and 0'-6". That would be wall, door, wall. The overall dimension should read 13'-0" accordingly. When it reads 16'-0" there is a math error.

Construction workers know the difference between actual vs nominal, as do architects. It is all taken into account in drawing plans.

Individual room sheets have inner dimensions of individual rooms, as well as usable square feet. The overall floorplan has overall dimensions and overall square feet. It accounts for thicknesses in lumber, drywall, vapor barrier, etc.

People just cant do math. I do have formal training.
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
People just cant do math. I do have formal training.
I'm one of those people who can't do math, and no formal training in architecture. I can read plans and understand they account for material thicknesses but couldn't begin to do what you do. My autoCAD experience is exclusively with a free reader lol.
Most of my time in a deal (AFTER spending months finding a tenant ready to take a space, then several weeks or longer negotiating deal terms) is spent trying to keep under control the attorneys representing the landlord and tenant, who often feel the need to prove their value and demonstrate their prowess to their respective clients. And they really don't care if the deal ever gets signed, the longer it goes on the more money they make. Not uncommon to spend a month or more just on the lease document review ?.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I'm one of those people who can't do math, and no formal training in architecture. I can read plans and understand they account for material thicknesses but couldn't begin to do what you do. My autoCAD experience is exclusively with a free reader lol.
Most of my time in a deal (AFTER spending months finding a tenant ready to take a space, then several weeks or longer negotiating deal terms) is spent trying to keep under control the attorneys representing the landlord and tenant, who often feel the need to prove their value and demonstrate their prowess to their respective clients. And they really don't care if the deal ever gets signed, the longer it goes on the more money they make. Not uncommon to spend a month or more just on the lease document review ?.
No thanks to that. I don't do well with customers. They really arent always right.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
Tons of math. Snow loads, wind loads, frost lines, square feet, easements, city codes, etc etc. Love that stuff.

I drew blueprints using AutoCAD for arch/eng firm for almost 9 years until the recession. Plenty of degreed architects dont know how to figure that stuff either. I would love it when I would get plans and the overall dimension is like 20'-0", but the inside string comes out to 18'-6". Where did the other 1'-6" go? Lots of times they just let me fix it accordingly instead of figuring it out themselves.

I miss that job.

so when I was in Architecture (1989-91), one of my profs was talking about the "reality of the job" after I had been bitchign about the math and science part. He was saying that in his life/career as an Architect, he never once worried about the math and science..."that is what the engineers are for" was his exact quote... :sneaky:
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
If I have a main medium, it's painting, but I tend to dabble in all sorts of stuff. I've even begun dabbling in blacksmithing. You know, even the drum restorations and conversions I've been doing lately are using similar skills. One of the things I try to teach my middle schoolers is to ignore the artificial barriers between art, craft, and vocational skills. Kids will be like "I'm no good at art, but I like to build things or work on cars." To me they're the same thing, when you get down to it. Weather you're painting, woodworking, or fixing a car (or designing buildings), these are all creative endeavors using your hands and tools. Sorry, didn't mean to get on my soapbox, lol.

church!!! Application of skills can/should be an across the board thing. Same with drumming. I always tell my kids: " you are going to learn about paradiddles, and scales, and sick grooves etc....but more importantly, you are going to learn about applying the skills needed to make this stuff happen to music in general, and also to life".

And no, I bought these Slingerlands recently on Guitar Center for $600. They were pretty beat up and the original white satin flame finish was wearing thin in a lot of places. So I rewrapped them and fixed them up.

were you able to find a match to the original satin flame?
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I'm one of those people who can't do math, and no formal training in architecture. I can read plans and understand they account for material thicknesses but couldn't begin to do what you do. My autoCAD experience is exclusively with a free reader lol.
Most of my time in a deal (AFTER spending months finding a tenant ready to take a space, then several weeks or longer negotiating deal terms) is spent trying to keep under control the attorneys representing the landlord and tenant, who often feel the need to prove their value and demonstrate their prowess to their respective clients. And they really don't care if the deal ever gets signed, the longer it goes on the more money they make. Not uncommon to spend a month or more just on the lease document review ?.

so the bass player in one of my bands does this...I never knew until right now what his job actually entailed...I thought he just negotiated deals all day...like the typical guy on the phone going: " buy. buy!!! sell sell!!!!"
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
so when I was in Architecture (1989-91), one of my profs was talking about the "reality of the job" after I had been bitchign about the math and science part. He was saying that in his life/career as an Architect, he never once worried about the math and science..."that is what the engineers are for" was his exact quote... :sneaky:
Sort of. All the problems arise once the design gets put to computer. The computer doesn't make math errors, so the problems became mine.

AutoCAD does not understand local building codes however. Neither do I. So that is math that the arch/eng needs to be good at, because each region has different requirements. Example: Florida doesnt need the same snow loads for a roof as North Dakota. Texas has different wind load requirements than Idaho because of hurricanes/tornadoes. These problems did not become mine. In these cases, I just put in the values given as it was above my pay grade.

Basically anyone can design a building. You still need an arch/eng to sign off on it because of code requirements. That's why they need math, science, a degree, and a state approved stamp.
 
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