Should I give up this hobby for drumming?

huangmi

Senior Member
hi, all. before you read any further, i want to tell you i'm not showing off(i'm not good enough to show off anyway!) okay, i really love drumming and i believe everyone in this forum does too! but i started doing tae kwon do half a year before doing drumming, i'm currently red belt in tae kwon do, i've come a long way to get this, take me nearly 2 years, but the problem is that i don't really enjoy doing it since the first time(my mom made me do it because i didn't have any hobbies 2 years ago). I know it's good for me, i can defend my self when someone is trying to fu** me up. i go to tae kwon do 3 hours a week, which is not much but still seem like a fair bit time for me, because all the school and studying shi* i have to do everyday!!! which means i don't really get much time for drumming at all!!!
what i thought is that i should quit as soon as i get a black belt, which will take me probably another 6 or 7 months to get to black belt, but there is a risk that i could fail the final grading and end up having to wait for another year to pass it!! i do 1 hour of weights lifting everyday as well(just to build my muscles up for drumming), and i got work 11 hours a week. so do you reckon i should stick with tae kwon do till i get to black belt or stop right now?
 

huangmi

Senior Member
If you're not into it, quit. Hobbies are supposed to be fun.​
It's true, but sometimes you have to do things you don't like its good for you just like school, no one likes school in my year but they believe that it's important for their future
 

huangmi

Senior Member
Truer words have never been spoken...

Maybe you can find another physical fitness activity that keeps your interest and can still be done without a lot of time invested into it?
Like I said I do weights for drumming. Other than that I don't really have much time for another hobby. I guess I'll just stick with drumming and my current interests
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
Find another hobby.Something you like this time.Why would you keep doing the same thing over and over if you don't like it.You don't have to like schooling and education,but they are quite different from a hobby.Do you and your friends in your school year, consider books to be kryptonite?

There are thousands of hobbies out there you may enjoy.Just pick one,and forget martial arts if you don't enjoy it.

Steve B
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
I learned Judo as a kid and my uncle, a sailor, taught me to grapple. I've never regretted it for a minute. The only time I lost a fight was when I was sloppy drunk. I just curled up in a ball and let the guy punch away on my back until he had enough.

I think 6 months will go by in a flash. Suck it up. Get that black belt, then go take a martial art that is more useful, like Judo or Ju-jitsu or Muy Thai boxing. maybe it's just that you don't like Tai Kwon Do.
 

groove1

Silver Member
Do them both if you can! Drumming is physical and being in great shape only helps.
More than one pro drummer does martial arts to stay fit. BUT most importantly....do what
you love. It is your life to live...and have fun along the way.
 

JimFiore

Silver Member
I know how you can save time. Stop "lifting weights for drumming".

Unless your goal is to become a drum mover, there is no need to lift weights for drumming. Granted, you can lift weights for other reasons, but doing it for drumming? Not so much. It's not like the sticks weigh 5 pounds each.
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
It's true, but sometimes you have to do things you don't like its good for you just like school, no one likes school in my year but they believe that it's important for their future
Don't equate education with having a hobby. Yes, an education is important. And necessary if you want any kind of a future.​
A hobby, on the other hand, is usually an activity done for pleasure.​
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
Okay, my friend. You've started asking questions with some meat on them, and I take it from the context of your posts that you're young. I applaud your quest for advice, and I want you to understand that life (if done properly) is long and offers many opportunities to revisit experiences that you did not have time for, or did not see the value of, at an earlier age. There are many stories on this forum of folks who either started drumming later in life, or quit playing for many years, only to return to it with renewed passion. There is no expiry date on learning how to play music, just on the ability to actually carry heavy equipment cases up and down backstage staircases. But I digress.

One of the most famous drummers of all time, Buddy Rich, practiced martial arts in addition to his world-class drumming, both of which, I understand, he started into at early ages. Look past the physical and personal security benefits of knowing a martial art, and you find some very useful life (and drumming-related) concepts:

- harmony and fluidity between mind and body (if you can visualize it, your body does it, without a lot of thought about how to do it)
- concentration, focus, and awareness
- discipline
- good practice habits
- types of movements that work in both settings (I have always thought that the Moeller stroke was akin to martial arts technique for drumming)

Not everyone can multitask or take on a slew of hobbies on top of their academics or work schedule. They used to call such people "Renaissance men", and there are very few of those anymore, as modern society has put a premium on specialization within fields. I tend to disagree; I think being as diversely experienced as possible will only help you in life.

This sounds like a conversation you may want to have with your mom as well. I'm going out on a limb and infer that there are cultural reasons behind your mom's choice of hobbies for you. I hope you understand that because of this, and because your mom cares for you and wants you to be a successful, well-rounded adult, she chose a hobby that will assist you in doing so if pursued correctly. That's a long step better than a parent who has no interest. So there's an opportunity for you to talk it out and get some advice from her.

I'm encouraged by the new direction you've shown in this thread. I hope it turns out well for you and you can find a way to make it all work. Best wishes!
 

julius

Member
"You always make time for what is important to you."

That's my personal motto.

I spent a lot of time playing computer games when I was younger. At the time it was important to me, but now being a dad, being the family breadwinner, and playing music is a lot more important -- by definition, since those three things eat up all my time!

Which is a roundabout way of saying what everyone else has said; if TKD is not important to you, stop doing it.
 

JohnPloughman

Silver Member
At some point in your life the statement " I got my black belt in........ at....... when I was......" is going to sound a whole lot better and more fulfilling to you than..... I quit.

"I quit" is fulfilling when it involves substance abuse and smoking. But for most everything else in life, not so much.

Another thought. Was the whole martial arts thing solely an effort to develop a hobby to keep you off video games? Or, was the foundation of it to learn discipline, self control, endurance, as well as a study in honor and courage and other good virtues that are part of a martial arts regimen? If so, then quitting would sort of say all you did was a waste of time. Would it not?
 
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huangmi

Senior Member
I know how you can save time. Stop "lifting weights for drumming".

Unless your goal is to become a drum mover, there is no need to lift weights for drumming. Granted, you can lift weights for other reasons, but doing it for drumming? Not so much. It's not like the sticks weigh 5 pounds each.
haha, no i build my muscles on the legs so i can kick the pedal better
 

slowrocker

Silver Member
If you're not into it, quit. Hobbies are supposed to be fun.​
True, hobbies should be fun, but sometimes developing skills one finds important is not about fun. I trained MMA for a while and hated training, but went and did it anyway, and now I am glad about it.

What does the belt mean to you? From my standpoint in MMA belts never meant anything, but to some people they are really important. Is it about a belt or a skill for you? As far as drumming goes, it can also be a very satisfying activity, or feel boring and end up wasting your time. Think about what will be more important to you in five years, a black belt or more advanced in drumming.
 

RedeyeSPR

Senior Member
I'm 40 and can play drums pretty well, am a scratch + bowler, better than average at darts, teach marching band, play functional piano, harmonica, and ukulele. The "jack of all trades, master of none" has worked out for me.

Consider your goal. If you want to end up making a living solely playing then you need to either drop everything and play, play, play, or hook up with a band that somehow gets a huge deal.

If you don't mind doing something else for a living and drumming for extra income and fun, then manage as many activities as you can. TKD seems like a pretty valuable skill to have. To be honest, a few situations in my life would have went better for me if I hadn't been scared to get into a fight. I'd finish that up and then pick a hobby that could be valuable later on, like if the zombies rise or something. Archery, blacksmithing, horseback riding, cooking, ect. Or else do what you like.
 

huangmi

Senior Member
True, hobbies should be fun, but sometimes developing skills one finds important is not about fun. I trained MMA for a while and hated training, but went and did it anyway, and now I am glad about it.

What does the belt mean to you? From my standpoint in MMA belts never meant anything, but to some people they are really important. Is it about a belt or a skill for you? As far as drumming goes, it can also be a very satisfying activity, or feel boring and end up wasting your time. Think about what will be more important to you in five years, a black belt or more advanced in drumming.
more advanced in drumming
 

JustJames

Platinum Member
haha, no i build my muscles on the legs so i can kick the pedal better
How far do you intend kicking it?

If you need to go the gym to strengthen up for the bass pedal, it might be time to reduce the tension on the pedal.
 
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