should i get a double bass pedal?

Woogy

Junior Member
Im an intermediate drummer and im fairly good with my heel toe. i know i still have a ton to master with one foot, but i dont see why i cant do that with another pedal at my disposal. Whats your take?
 

mkyfri

Junior Member
in my opinion, heel toe is overated.. i dont know why everyone is all caught up on the heel toe thing... its a great technique but there are others. its good to learn as many as ya can.. try the swivel technique, watch george kollias for more info on this... as far as double pedaling... go for it...if used properly its a great addition to your arsenal.. alot of people will say doubles using two pedals is cheating or this an that... bleh... if you can make your drumming easier on yourself then go for it! solid drumming takes prescedence over flash any day....
 
it honestly depends on your style of playing. sure, double bass is cool for breakdowns ect., but if your not using heavy double bass with every song, its best just to master heel-toe. i spent about $200 on my double bass. i only use one pedal and the other is over in the corner collecting dust
 

konaboy

Pioneer Member
It can't hurt to learn it, it's part of your craft. Really depends on the music you play and whether you have money for one.
 

thelimpingtoad

Senior Member
I have found that in my opinion (and i'm not a double bass player) that my old double bass pedal didn't offer the kind of responsiveness or whatever that i liked having in my single kick. At least it just didn't feel the same to me... I have also played on double bass (with 2 kick drums) and that felt a lot better to me...
Maybe its just that I never really got into playing the double bass since my right foot technique (heel up only) allows me to get pretty fast double strokes and single strokes.

It never hurts to learn it though... Its especially good to learn i'd say if you play a lot of music that requires double bass. which is probably another reason I never use mine.
 

Davo-London

Gold Member
There is also the technique of using the kick and the floor tom to act as the other bass drum.

So by playing 2 x 32nds on the RH floor tom and then 2 x 32nds on the kick drum and repeated, you get a fascimile of twin pedal kick drum. This is a great technique to master and whilst not sounding the same goes some way to matching the double bass sound.

This means that, assuming you are a RHer, you get to play the Hihat and snare with the LH. Another good technique to learn.

When you've got that mastered you will have forgotten about the double bass pedal.

Counterwise, if you play metal in a band, you will be ostracized if you don't have a double bass pedal!

Davo
 
A

audiotech

Guest
I've been playing many, many years on a single pedal. Last May of 08 when I bought my Tama Starclassic Bubinga kit I toyed with the idea of getting a double pedal, so I bought a Tama Power Glide double pedal. I bought it mainly to exercise my left leg and foot to get it close to the power of my right leg. I started to really like it and catch onto playing it, in fact so did my girlfriend who actually turned out to be a better DB player than me. Anyway that purchase saved me a lot of frustration and money in the long run. At the end of May 08, I landed in the hospital for 6 days for right foot surgery and after getting out of the hospital, I couldn't play with my right foot for over a month. It was a good thing I practiced for those three weeks using my left foot on the bass. I was able to still gig and get my session work done using my left foot on the kick right after getting out of the hospital.

I really never have a real need for my double base pedal for the genre of music I play, but it did build up the muscle tone in my left leg.



Dennis
 

thelimpingtoad

Senior Member
I really never have a real need for my double base pedal for the genre of music I play, but it did build up the muscle tone in my left leg.
Good story... good to see you can be effective without one of your limbs.
I thought it was funny about the leg muscle thing because since i've been playing more recently my GF commented the other day that my right leg is much bigger than my left.
 

JoeLackey

Senior Member
I, personally, don't think I would use a double pedal. Using a single forces me to be more creative. If I did use a double, it would just be for fills and grooves, like Gavin Harrison does.
 

Dedworx

Senior Member
Im an intermediate drummer and im fairly good with my heel toe. i know i still have a ton to master with one foot, but i dont see why i cant do that with another pedal at my disposal. Whats your take?
is there a NEED for it in the music you are(or going to be) playing?

thats your answer i think. if theres no need, its a waste of time that could be spent on things you'll use. - just my opinion ofcourse.
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
If I did use a double, it would just be for fills and grooves
I've played a single pedal for over 20 years. Several months ago I lashed out for a double kick for the fun of it. This is all I want to achieve with it too. I'll never blast beat at 250bpm with the thing.......but there's some pretty cool applications for the "fills and grooves" purposes I reckon. It'll take me a while to come up with anything meaningful with it....but it's been fun applying a new skill set regardless.
 

PeniScott

Silver Member
Why do people always assume that double pedals are always used for rock and metal? it annoys me.

Tony Royster Jr., Benny Greb, Dennis Chambers, Carter Beauford, Alex Acuna. They all play funk, soul, jazz, latin and R&B and they use double pedals really well.

Personally, genre means absolutely nothing when it comes to double pedals, it just comes down to how you use it.

xoxo
 
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Music is Awesome

Senior Member
I find that I somewhat attached to my dbl pedal now. I feel uncomfortable playing without it even though when I'm playing a song I don't really use it. Anyways back to the point I think you should pick up a pedal for like $100 and see if you like/need it.
 
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