Should I be worried? - New cymbal purchase

organworthyplayer337

Well-known member
I just purchased some brand new hi hats from Memphis drum shop. These were demoed for mycymbal.com so I got to hear them before I purchased. I thought they sounded great and I was ready to try something new.

they arrived today and the bottom hat has this weird oblong thing going on. I’ve heard of keyholing, but this definitely wasn’t from wear and tear. Justs looks like a weirdly placed hammer mark.


should I worry about this? Tone wise, they sound great but I know keyholing is a big issue for some drummers and if I resale, I don’t know if this is going to be a big issue.
IMG_6352.jpeg

Thanks
 

johnjssmith

Junior Member
I'd definitely contact the manufacturer to ask whether they think it's normal/plausible for a bottom hat's hole to be deformed like that.
If they say it's allright and you shouldn't worry then don't worry, and if they say you should have it replaced then call the seller, explain the situation (the product you were sent is defective) and they'll arrange for you to get a perfect one.
The perks of buying new...
 

Superman

Gold Member
I too get funny about little things like that. If I bought it used, it wouldn't bother me at all. If I bought it new, I expect it to be perfect unless I got it dirt cheap. If you aren't happy, return it. It doesn't look like key holing though, it looks like it wasn't made completely round during manufacturing. It wouldn't affect playability at all.
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
Looks like during hammering, one strike landed way up on the bell, and very close to the hole. Like CM stated ..... "I don't think the integrity of the cymbal will be threatened in the least." Maybe it qualifies as a blem, so I'm sure Memphis would take it back, no problem. If you like the hats however, I'd keep 'em.
 

zenstat

Member
I'm a little confused by your description so I've annotated a few features on the image. The green circle is a wandering in the lathing as far as I can see. There are a few of those. They are usually because the surface is uneven. The surface is usually uneven because of hammering. The smaller green oval right near the mounting hole might be something else. Just outside the mounting hole there tends to be a ring of oven crust which isn't lathed away. That's common on both the top and bottom side. The feature which I would wonder about is that the mounting hole doesn't appear to be as round as they usually are when they come out of the factory. So can you tell me again what your worry is? It would also help to know what series and model these hats are. There are some model and series specific features in how the bell is processed which might also shed some light.

hats-query 2.jpeg
 

organworthyplayer337

Well-known member
I'd definitely contact the manufacturer to ask whether they think it's normal/plausible for a bottom hat's hole to be deformed like that.
If they say it's allright and you shouldn't worry then don't worry, and if they say you should have it replaced then call the seller, explain the situation (the product you were sent is defective) and they'll arrange for you to get a perfect one.
The perks of buying new...
You think you'd avoid such conundrums when buying new from a reputable seller but here we are ?‍♀️ haha
 

organworthyplayer337

Well-known member
I'm a little confused by your description so I've annotated a few features on the image. The green circle is a wandering in the lathing as far as I can see. There are a few of those. They are usually because the surface is uneven. The surface is usually uneven because of hammering. The smaller green oval right near the mounting hole might be something else. Just outside the mounting hole there tends to be a ring of oven crust which isn't lathed away. That's common on both the top and bottom side. The feature which I would wonder about is that the mounting hole doesn't appear to be as round as they usually are when they come out of the factory. So can you tell me again what your worry is? It would also help to know what series and model these hats are. There are some model and series specific features in how the bell is processed which might also shed some light.

View attachment 103003
I thought I made it clear what I was talking about in my OP but reading back, I definitely didn't. The center hole not being completely round is what I was referring to.
 

organworthyplayer337

Well-known member
I'll send a message to MDS tomorrow morning. I hate returning gear 'cause shipping gets expensive and the whole process tires me out. I also purchased a new crash from them in the same order and it has a sizable scratch on it. Hopefully they offer partial refunds, if not... I'll take it on the chin as a lesson learned. Thanks everyone for chiming in!
 

lefty2

Platinum Member
I think it's an optical illusion more than anything else the wavy lathing makes it looks like everything is all out of whack.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I'll send a message to MDS tomorrow morning. I hate returning gear 'cause shipping gets expensive and the whole process tires me out. I also purchased a new crash from them in the same order and it has a sizable scratch on it. Hopefully they offer partial refunds, if not... I'll take it on the chin as a lesson learned. Thanks everyone for chiming in!

One issue with buying cymbals from a retailer such as Memphis Drum Shop is that they might be tested (played) by potential buyers on a regular basis. Thus, what's advertised as new can bear some blemishes. On the flip side, the great thing about Memphis Drum Shop is that their videos allow you to listen to the exact cymbals you'll be purchasing. Personally, I wouldn't worry too much about minor cosmetic flaws on cymbals. They get marked up as we play them regardless. Still, only you can decide what you're comfortable with. Good luck!
 

zenstat

Member
Yes they are hand hammered!

What series then? I don't know of any Zildjian production series which is hand hammered. There are some one off cymbals which are hand hammered. Paul Francis and one other person hammer the bells on the Kerope series after the cup has been pressed in. But that is hammered by machine with a person positioning the cymbal, not hammering with a hammer powered by human muscle. More of this very specific definitions thing.

*** edit: turns out they are revealed as Meinl Byzance Foundry so are hand hammered ***
 
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organworthyplayer337

Well-known member
What series then? I don't know of any production series which is hand hammered. There are some one off cymbals which are hand hammered. Paul Francis and one other person hammer the bells on the Kerope series after the cup has been pressed in. But that is hammered by machine with a person positioning the cymbal, not hammering with a hammer powered by human muscle.
It's the Meinl Byzance Foundry Reserve series.
 

organworthyplayer337

Well-known member
One issue with buying cymbals from a retailer such as Memphis Drum Shop is that they might be tested (played) by potential buyers on a regular basis. Thus, what's advertised as new can bear some blemishes. On the flip side, the great thing about Memphis Drum Shop is that their videos allow you to listen to the exact cymbals you'll be purchasing. Personally, I wouldn't worry too much about minor cosmetic flaws on cymbals. They get marked up as we play them regardless. Still, only you can decide what you're comfortable with. Good luck!
you're 100% correct. If MDS says they can only take returns, I'll move on. At the end of the day, all I want to do is enjoy the cymbals, and that's still possible slight blems or not.
 

SharkSandwich

Junior Member
If it sounds good, let it go. I can't see that having any effect in the sound or life of the cymbal.
 
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