Sewing machine oil for lugs?

Cleforo

Senior Member
Do you have any experiences with using sewing machine oil for lugs? Good, bad? It shouldn't damage the hardware/chrome, should it?
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
It will work.
It won't hurt anything.

I prefer silicone based cream type lube for lugs.
Automotive stores sell it in small tubes.
It is used for lubricating electrical connections and brake components, etc
 
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audiotech

Guest
I just use a very small dab of Vaseline on the very tip of the tension rods. Some oils just seems too thin for the most part and can run.

Dennis
 

Les Ismore

Platinum Member
I use mineral oil (baby oil, unscented).

Keep your chrome lightly coated and it will never rust. Way better than polishes, which can be easily compromised through use/time.
 

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skod

Senior Member
Yeah, you might do well to do that as soon as you can. I just restored a DW5000 double kick pedal from eBay where the previous owner had lubricated the bearings with vegetable cooking oil. Over time, it had turned into the kind of greasy stiff concrete that you usually find clogging vent hoods in restaurants, and had basically seized up the bearings. New bearings and the pedal was good to go again. Vegetable oils aren't stable in the presence of air, and will eventually oxidize, stiffen, and gum up- so fix it while you can.

I use Permatex antiseize compound ( http://www.permatex.com/products/automotive/lubricants/specialty_lubricants/Permatex_Anti-Seize_Lubricant_a.htm )- you can get a 1oz tube of it at any auto parts place for $3 that will last the rest of your natural life. This stuff is specifically designed to keep threads from binding or galling. A little of it goes a long, long way, and it clings to threads essentially forever- wipe away any excess after the initial application and forget that it is there. From automotive practice, I've always used this on any threaded fastener that I absolutely did not want to gall up and sieze. This is particularly important when the male and female threads of a given fastener pair are made in dissimilar metals, as in the case of mixed stainless steel, mild steel, brass, and aluminum parts. You won't run into that with lugs all that often, but pedals and strainers do this all over the place. It certainly can't hurt!
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
I just use a very small dab of Vaseline on the very tip of the tension rods. Some oils just seems too thin for the most part and can run.

Dennis
Yep. Maybe not a big deal, just slimy if you happen to touch it.

I've always used white lithium grease, a small tub will last a lifetime and never, ever go bad. Vaseline also works, and if you're snooty, you can use GM Lubriplate lubricant, which is a light tan colored grease. I have a can from 1978 and it's still good, and still smells like fresh auto parts. :)

Bermuda
 

tard

Gold Member
The lugs on my radials are stainless so they work best clean and dry but on the other kits I have owned I always found oils or lubes of any kind caused dirt to collect making things worse so I started cleaning them with tuner cleaner then using a quick dry silicone spray on the threaded part of the tension rod leaving them dry and tack free but still lubricated.
 
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bobdadruma

Platinum Member
Great, just what I needed to hear!



Any particular reason you prefer the silicone based cream lube?
I work on cars for a living and I always have it.
I also notice that drum factories use it. I have seen it on new drums from several manufacturers.
 

Les Ismore

Platinum Member
i use sewing machine oil as lubricant for my pedals, so it'll work fine for tension rods

Sewing machine oil stinks tho.

Quote:
Originally Posted by audiotech
I just use a very small dab of Vaseline on the very tip of the tension rods. Some oils just seems too thin for the most part and can run.

Dennis
Yep. Maybe not a big deal, just slimy if you happen to touch it.



I used VASELINE as a lube a long time ago (used to on the underside of my drumheads as a muting experiment too). I ended up getting some on my hand at a gig, like crazy slippery on the stick, didn't have a rag and was jumping into the next song.

I was literally forced to lighten-up on the grip of my stick. It proved to me as a young player that one does not need to hammer fist the sticks. Had I used my regular grip force, the stick would have flown out of my hand.



If you're talking about lubing tension rods, I coat the entire threaded portion and the whole rod w/mineral oil. Your threads will rust and any type of grease is going to compound after time and its not as clean looking as mineral oil, which seems to hang around forever undetected by nose or eyes.

The tops of the tension rods will rust due to abuse from drum keys. I love the composite WEDGIE key, it won't flake the chrome of the tops of your rods.

Hear that? Non metal drum keys, they're less abusive on drum/hardware finishes, lighter in weight (ever drop a drum key on your bare foot?) and they wear about the same as pot metal keys.


...................
 

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audiotech

Guest
Some people must be very sloppy when applying a dab of Vaseline to the threaded end of a tension rod, lol. Who would need to do this at a gig where there is a chance of getting some on your fingers just before picking up your sticks? Just wipe off the tops of your lugs after you're finished preparing your drums and there will be no trace of Vaseline to have access to your digits. I hate having to revert to personal history, but I've been doing this for more than fifty years and never had a stick fly from my hands due to over lubricating the tension rods with Vaseline.

BTW, I've also used Luberex, Krytox, Lubriplate and Phonolube and the Vaseline works just as well and much easier to locate at most any store. So, if you're a bit sloppy, any lubrication product that finds its way to your hands will cause a certain amount of slipperiness between your hands and anything they try to grasp.

Dennis
 

Les Ismore

Platinum Member
Some people must be very sloppy when applying a dab of Vaseline to the threaded end of a tension rod, lol. Who would need to do this at a gig where there is a chance of getting some on your fingers just before picking up your sticks? Just wipe off the tops of your lugs after you're finished preparing your drums and there will be no trace of Vaseline to have access to your digits. I hate having to revert to personal history, but I've been doing this for more than fifty years and never had a stick fly from my hands due to over lubricating the tension rods with Vaseline.

BTW, I've also used Luberex, Krytox, Lubriplate and Phonolube and the Vaseline works just as well and much easier to locate at most any store. So, if you're a bit sloppy, any lubrication product that finds its way to your hands will cause a certain amount of slipperiness between your hands and anything they try to grasp.

Dennis



If you're referring to my post, I assuming you must have misread it, understandable.

If you read it again, you'll find that nowhere did I say I touched a tension rod (with VASELINE on it) before I opened a bottle of wine, or before I touched my sticks.

I love referring to personal history, its the real truth in my case. At the time of the incident I was using VASELINE on everything, including the bass drum pedal, which is where I picked up a portion when I made a spring tension adjustment.

VASELINE is not the best lube, attracts too much dirt and its unstable, melts around 100 degrees F. When I discovered this is when I stopped using it.
 
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audiotech

Guest
If you're referring to my post, I assuming you must have misread it, understandable.

If you read it again, you'll find that nowhere did I say I touched a tension rod (with VASELINE on it) before I opened a bottle of wine, or before I touched my sticks.

I love referring to personal history, its the real truth in my case. At the time of the incident I was using VASELINE on everything, including the bass drum pedal, which is where I picked up a portion when I made a spring tension adjustment.

VASELINE is not the best lube, attracts too much dirt and its unstable, melts around 100 degrees F. When I discovered this is when I stopped using it.
No use getting all Perry Mason on me, lol. Yours was not the only post that I was referring to. From answering this question dozens of times, on this and other drum forums, I was just covering my bases on comments that were already posted on other threads relating to the use of Vaseline as a tension rod lubricant. Unlike your past overly indulging use of Vaseline on everything, mine is just limited for use on the ends of the tension rods and in Very small quantities. When the drum is assemballed and if the exposed threaded portion of the tension rod is touched, nothing would transfer to the fingers since the Vaseline would be deeply embedded into the lug. Hence the reason I used the word "sloppy" for individuals sloppily coating the tension rod threads or any other mechanism that might need lubrication.

Dennis
 
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