Second Floor Tom Position

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sticks4drums

Guest
I would like help in understanding why so many people prefer floor tom position drums over front position toms. My thinking is that it is much easier to reach the front toms with both hands than it is to reach the second floor tom position with either hand. In the trade we were always told to move your hips and upper body together whenever possible. Many older tradesman I knew had worn out disks from just rotating their upper bodies all of the time while up on ladders. I see the same problem when I try and reach my second floor tom position drum, and even more so when I reach for my third floor tom position drum, which is there for looks most of all, and the odd beating just because it sounds so mean. :) All that rotating to reach those floor toms can't be good for out backs. Most of my fills use my front 3 toms, 10, 12, 13, and my first floor tom position drum, 15. My gigging kit will only have these four toms. The 15 works great as a stand alone floor because it sounds much bigger than a 14" floor, but can also sound as big as a 16 if you want it to.

What say you?
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
I like having the second floor tom, but I also position mine so it can be struck without any unnecessary twisting. Several have commented that it seems like it is in an odd position, but it follows the natural striking position for my right hand much more naturally than if it was closer to me.



 
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sticks4drums

Guest
Good idea Winston, but how do you reach the second floor tom with your left hand?
 

Duracell

Senior Member
Kits are set up in a way that suits are individual playing styles. I guess many drummers place a higher priority on ride placement over tom placement. Which makes sense as most of us spend more time on the ride than on any of our toms.

With the ride hanging over the bassdrum (the preferred spot for many of us) it leaves us with only a few options for further toms:

1. Extra floor toms, which seems to be quite popular right now
2. Offset toms where the high toms are shifted to the left of the drummer. I like this option but many find that the space between the bass drum and hi-hat pedal becomes to large.
3. Hanging a tom on or near the hi-hat (or placing a floor tom there). An interesting option which I actually haven't tried yet.

Personally I don't have to use any of these options right now. I currently play one up one down :p.
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
Good idea Winston, but how do you reach the second floor tom with your left hand?
It isn't really that far over, but I don't need to hit it with the left hand that often anyway. When I do I'd much rather lean slightly to the right to help out the left hand than constantly pull my right arm in to hit a floor tom placed too close.
 

diegobxr

Silver Member
Hey Winston, very cool throne, man! Hehe.

:D

About the thread.. like Duracell, I play a 4-piece, so I don't have any tom positioning issue. :)

Cheers!
 

inneedofgrace

Platinum Member
I wrap the second floor tom around in an arc so they are somewhat equal distance from the throne. I rotate my whole body on the throne to reach it. However, I don't use the second floor tom that much - usually only for long fills or for backbeat on a couple songs, so I'm not straining that often. My ride cymbal is directly over the first floor tom.

 
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audiotech

Guest
No matter which kit I play, the second or "low" floor tom sits at about the same position. It's very easy to get to using one or both hands. I do play mostly traditional grip, but matched grip of course is a little easier to reach. I sit just slightly rear of the 16" tom.





Dennis
 
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