Say you had 20 minutes to warm up...

iwantmemoney

Senior Member
and could do only one rudiment...which would it be?

I'm asking for the sake of finding the most comprehensive, concentrated hand exercise...and I think I go with the flam tap, mostly because it gets multiples going right away.

Possibly the double paradiddle, because the repeating transition from singles to the double...and back again...forces my hands to surrender their death grip and find the correct grip.

If a single rudiment isn't inclusive enough, how about a concentrated sticking sequence that does it all for you?

(i have to add a footnote and say that i think the single stroke is the most overlooked rudiment, when we're busy trying to do all this fancy stuff, without even having a good single first!!!)
 
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brady

Platinum Member
The one I use the most that comes closest is something I got from Tommy Igoe's Great Hands DVD.

It's a 7 paradiddle-diddles and 1 double paradiddle on the end. It switches lead hands every other measure. Played as sextuplets...

There is also a similarly designed triplet exercise with Swiss triplets with a flam accent on the end.
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
I guess the question would be "If you had 2 minutes..." I can't see practicing one rudiment for twenty minutes straight unless it was for some type of endurance purposes. But then it would be practicing and not warming up.

If I had 20 minutes to warm up, I would do:

5 minutes single and double combinations (rudiments, pg 5 Stick Control, etc.)

5 minute open roll exercises (Stick Control, Master Studies, rudiments, etc.)

5 minutes Flam exercises (rudiments, exercises from Stick Control, Master Studies)

5 minutes of any necessary techniques for the gig, rehearsal, whatever comes after the warmup.

Jeff
 

Zickosdrummer

Senior Member
I would play around the set a couple of times to make sure everything was where I wanted it and then go out and get a sandwich.
 

iwantmemoney

Senior Member
thanks for the input...i agree on diddles and reversing the lead-very crucial for any significant progress...and the 5 min. visits to each dept.- i like that. but clearly the best is from the "clear"ly best drums man! funny man... by the way, i don't get to visit much here, but did you ever recover your drums?
 

bamdrummer

Senior Member
paradiddle-a-diddle
RLRRLRR-LRLLRLL
They can be played as septuplets or they can be worked into a 2 measure phrase played as sixteenth notes:
RLRRLRRLRLLRLLRLRRLRRLRLLRLLR
(last note played as a quarter note)
makes for cool fills around the kit
 

BillBachman

Gold Member
I think the best thing to do would be to vary the rudiments in order to warm up different muscles/hand motions. I had an exercise called "Trip Stepper" in one of my earlier Chop Builders articles in Modern Drummer that had a system which alternated between accent/tap patterns and flowing singles in a simple formula.

When I'm in a hurry to warm up I actually don't use sticks--just wrists turning to play on my legs gets me warmed up faster than anything else it seems.
 

iwantmemoney

Senior Member
i am smoothing out that a-diddle right now...and i see what you're saying on fills with it. cool tip.

i'm not too savvy on getting to the MD articles, but am sure i'll find it as soon as time allows. just by the name of the exercise, it's gotta be up my alley on this question. working just the hands with no sticks is very cool. i am often doing some form of that anyway, because when you know what you're going to need, it becomes a very realistic solution, and there are many times where having a pair of sticks in hand isn't appropriate or possible. i'd like to watch you, but i can imagine...

i've checked out glenn miller and the remote hi-hat. the thing is that it's great to be able to talk with pros and i appreciate it a lot. the hi-hat is just amazingly well done man. i'm probably not going for one cause i don't need it, but if the time comes, i would contact you. happy new year....
 

Zickosdrummer

Senior Member
thanks for the input...i agree on diddles and reversing the lead-very crucial for any significant progress...and the 5 min. visits to each dept.- i like that. but clearly the best is from the "clear"ly best drums man! funny man... by the way, i don't get to visit much here, but did you ever recover your drums?
No. :-( I am filing an insurance claim next week :-(
 
W

wy yung

Guest
I'd make sure I went to the toilet before the gig.

That is my biggest priority.

Going to the toilet.

Speaking of which.........
 

iwantmemoney

Senior Member
there are undergarments available for these issues tho it wouldn't be that fun playing once you'd soiled them. i guess by your post that maybe you've seen this same question in different forms probably a hundred different times over the years... every time i search for threads i have the most absurd results, so i've temporarily given up. but i have enjoyed and learned some good stuff from reading a lot of your stuff!
 
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W

wy yung

Guest
there are undergarments available for these issues tho it wouldn't be that fun playing once you'd soiled them. i guess by your post that maybe you've seen this same question in different forms probably a hundred different times over the years... every time i search for threads i have the most absurd results, so i've temporarily given up. but i have enjoyed and learned some good stuff from reading a lot of your stuff!
Thanks mate.

Yes children always remember to go before you play. It saves annoying complications. ;-)
 

Bennett Williams

Junior Member
My standard warmup routine is as follows:

Each sticking group below is played until the hands begin to feel like they are getting used to it and starting to loosen up. Then proceed to the next group.

12) { II: RRRRRRRRRRRR LLLLLLLLLLLL :II }
11) { II: RRRRRRRRRRR LLLLLLLLLLL :II }
10) { II: RRRRRRRRRR LLLLLLLLLL :II }
9) { II: RRRRRRRRR LLLLLLLLL :II }
8) { II: RRRRRRRR LLLLLLLL :II }
7) { II: RRRRRRR LLLLLLL :II }
6) { II: RRRRRR LLLLLL :II }
5) { II: RRRRR LLLLL :II }
4) { II: RRRR LLLL :II }
3) { II: RRR LLL :II }

At this point each of the following exercises are played open-close-open; that they are started at a very slow speed (open), gradually accelerated to the drummer's top speed (closed), held at that top speed for as long as possible, then gradually slowing sown back to the speed the exercise was started at (open). Make the transitions between tempos as smooth as possible. There should be no change in volume or technique. (i.e., changing from a double-stroke roll to a press roll for the closed portion is not the right way to do it.)

2) { II: RR LL :II } double stroke roll
1) { II: RLRLRLRL :II } single stroke roll
F) { II: lR rL lR rL :II } alternating flams
R) { II: llR rrL llR rrL :II } alternating ruffs / drags

This may take a little longer than 20 minutes, but it is well worth it.

-BW
 

Swiss Matthias

Platinum Member
I always try to remember that warming up doesn't mean full blast and blistering speed, but warming up.

There's an accent/paradiddle exercise I like to do sometimes:

I go through all the accents possible in 16th-note subdivisions (Oooo, oOoo, ooOo, oooO, OOoo, oOOo, etc), playing them all with the same paradiddle sticking (RlrrrLrll, rLrrlRll, etc). I play the whole exercise repeating every combination say 4 times, and try to go from combination to combination smoothly without stopping. I may play the whole thing on the snare, or orchestrate the accents on the toms.

Sometimes I start every combination slow and speed it up, but not beyond the point where I couldn't play it smoothly, accurately and without cramping up anymore.

I'm sure warmed up after that :).
 

jjmason777

Senior Member
Tommy Igoe's Great Hands For a Lifetime DVD comes with an excellent warm-up routine, complete with a poster, a smaller size version of the poster for your stick bag, and mp3's with clicks for your iPod. One of the best I've seen.
 

iwantmemoney

Senior Member
i appreciate the answers...these are all good for my objective, which is to get my hands ready to play with the most efficiency and finesse...igoe too, what a stud muffin. plus i can see where the term swiss clockwork comes from.

my hands have to re-learn how to hold the sticks every time i pick them up, but i can see my right hand is getting real close. it sometimes takes supreme restraint not to just blast away on stupid stuff. i am watching things open up for me, though my left hand trad grip is the most challenging to bring to a level where i'm executing with complete integrity-it's easier to stop at a point where i'm getting things done pretty well, as opposed to having the discipline to find the grip that opens all the doors.

some things that i throw in, just when i think i'm getting warmed up, would be a couple bars of 16ths singles that turn around at the end of the second or fourth bar with a double so the next bars lead with the opposite hand.

then i'll throw a ruff in somewhere, because the ruff tells my grip that it has to accomodate more than just singles.

i like rllrllrllrllrllrllrllrll and vice versa, because there is a little more space between the doubles than with a ruff, and again it forces my hands to get into the right grip, just to be able to execute. i shoot for 120 bpm and like putting an accent on every other single, like an upbeat kind of feel.

i shoot for the push-pull idea also specifically cause my hand must let go in order to execute. very big on this and moeller movements, in order to break through to higher levels and more control with less effort...

another is the single stroke, veggo...it seems like i just discovered it, and one thing i like is going a certain speed with bursts thrown in, and right back into the basic speed. just as with all other exercises, i'm finding it's better to do short bursts absolutely perfectly executed, many times very lightly, because the muscles then have something to bite into, and pretty soon it gets really good. not to mention that after some good singles exercising, i can do flam taps at light speed(for me), and totally fluidly.
 
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toddbishop

Platinum Member
I'm not sure I follow the reasoning behind reducing down to only one thing, but I do warm up quickly, in about 5-7 minutes. I do some relaxed doubles, then triples, then at a moderate tempo I'll take flam accents and pataflaflas through their inversions. Then I'm ready to practice. If I'm warming up to play, I'll probably take another 5-10 minutes and run some flamadiddles/inversions and Three Camps as rolls and as fast accented singles.

If you're going the really reductive route of treating single strokes as a rudiment, I would include in that double strokes, multiple-bounce strokes, down- and up-strokes. Probably also the free stroke and any of the other Moeller/specialty strokes you want to mess with.
 
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