Rubber bass drum feet vs spikes

WallyY

Platinum Member
I take it you have the DW9500? I believe those are made out of concrete!
Does that thing have spikes?
If it does it's in the running for my new hat stand. That, or the Speed Cobra.

I have this as my main stand. It won't die, won't pitt, rubber is still supple, it's been all over the country, unadjustable, dead simple and still has the original felt after almost 30 years. I just need to change the felt at the top of the footboard.
 

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Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
Do you really think the rubber is doing anything?
Yes, it does actually :)

If you use spikes only, there's chances that the spikes will go through the drumrug/carpet and possibly damage the floor underneath.

I set the rubber feet so that there's just enough spikes showing to go through say half the thickness of my drumrug, so it's impossible for the spikes to damage the floor. I've been doing this for years and years, no problems, no slippages of the BD and no damages to any floor.

For the record my hi-hat legs and bass drum pedals are set the same way, ie: spikes only go through half the drumrug. I never experienced any slippages or any rattles whatsoever.

So there you go Uncle Spike :)
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
The reason I ask is because when Andy was at my place earlier in the year, of course he noticed that I removed his really cool bass drum leg attachment, the foot part that houses the rubber part of the feet. As nice as it's designed, I don't use rubber feet, so I unscrewed it from the bass drum leg, which just leaves a spike. That foot was getting in the way of where I needed to put a cymbal stand leg, so I removed it.

I could tell Andy was a little deflated that I removed it considering the hours and cost spent designing and manufacturing it.
Yes Larry, I was mortified at the visual of a naked spur!

As others have reported, the rubber element (almost irrespective of design) is used mostly to stop the spike digging too far into the rug or carpet. That said, we do have owners who set up on wooden floors, & use the rubber only option for doing so.

No rattles on these babies due to rubber isolation from the spur shaft. Pictured below is the beauty you chose to discard because you couldn't be arsed moving the foot of a cymbal stand by half an inch! ;)
 

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philrudd

Senior Member
Wow, surprised to hear that so many use the rubber.

I've got a heavy foot - too heavy, in truth; if I could learn to lighten up (something I'm working on) I'm sure my technique would improve - and I use a large, heavy bass drum, a 24" 1980 Ludwig.

Not only do I use the spikes, but I've actually taken a file to them to really sharpen them up. I use a fairly heavy rug (an small Oriental-type thick weave that the in-laws were discarding) and haven't noticed any stage gouging.

To those who winced reading that - thinking of the damage done to the playing area - I can't help but think of John Densmore's book, where he describes approaching Elvin Jones after a gig while Jones was using a hammer to pry out the nails he'd driven into the stage for bass drum support. From what I can gather, it was a regular practice for Mr. Jones. And likely other drummers from the era.

Seems like Elvin didn't worry too much about scratching floors. And who am I to play holier-than-Elvin?
 

WallyY

Platinum Member
That looks like something with which to smoke weed, but pay no attention. Americans have a natural propensity towards customizing things, so even if the thing is already perfect, something must be added or removed to make way for the scent of individuality.
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
Those are the best designed spurs I've ever seen. Seems like sacrilege to remove them....

Anyway, I also keep half rubber, half spike on my carpet, but I have been known use the rubber feet if I'm on wood or tiles or brick paving and forgot the rug.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Maybe I'll put them back on. It does look better with them on. I never tried the half spike half rubber thing. It sounds reasonable. Plus Andy will stop sticking his Uncle Larry voodoo doll with hat pins.
 
M

Matt Bo Eder

Guest
Does that thing have spikes?
If it does it's in the running for my new hat stand. That, or the Speed Cobra.

I have this as my main stand. It won't die, won't pitt, rubber is still supple, it's been all over the country, unadjustable, dead simple and still has the original felt after almost 30 years. I just need to change the felt at the top of the footboard.
Oh yeah. Both the 5500 and the 9500 have these steel spikes that run vertical next to the pedal that you can tighten with drum key screws. Very solid.
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
I can't help but think of John Densmore's book, where he describes approaching Elvin Jones after a gig while Jones was using a hammer to pry out the nails he'd driven into the stage for bass drum support.
Reminds me of the time I lent my drum set to a casual friend for a gig he had. When he returned it I discovered that he had driven 16p nails through the BD shell and into the wooden stage!

GeeDeeEmm
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Reminds me of the time I lent my drum set to a casual friend for a gig he had. When he returned it I discovered that he had driven 16p nails through the BD shell and into the wooden stage!

GeeDeeEmm
Shut. Up. Really? That's one of the worst things I ever heard!

How did you handle that?

Reminds me of the time in the 80's when I lent my custom made Eames drums (no front bass head) to a drummer acquaintance. I specifically told him to NOT scratch my shells. I dropped in on his gig to hear my set played by a great drummer. To my horror he had a raw cinderblock inside the bass drum, why I don't know. I flipped!
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
Reminds me of the time I lent my drum set to a casual friend for a gig he had. When he returned it I discovered that he had driven 16p nails through the BD shell and into the wooden stage!
Wow! That's appalling.

Don't ever lend this person your car! It might come back with a 'sunroof' or even converted into a convertible.
 

philrudd

Senior Member
Reminds me of the time I lent my drum set to a casual friend for a gig he had. When he returned it I discovered that he had driven 16p nails through the BD shell and into the wooden stage!

GeeDeeEmm
Good god, I don't think even Elvin could have supported that move.
 

Mikeyboyeee

Senior Member
I use the spikes but leave the rubber feet on as well... I'll usually retract the spikes when putting the drum in it's case as well -- Anal, I know?!

I've been looking at a pair of these to try on a kit -- I think these would be just the ticket for a vintage kit with the old-timey spurs that really do nothing:

http://www.kbrakes.com/
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
I'm with you, Larry.

Bass drum creep is the worst thing that can ever happen while playing - outside of spontaneously combusting, of course.

I still have the rubber feet on my spurs, but they're threaded all the way up and cinched down hard so they may as well not be there. My drums are never set up anywhere where nice floors are a concern.
 

tcspears

Gold Member
On carpet I usually just use the spikes, but I like leaving the rubber feet on for aesthetic reasons. Whenever I play on hard wood or tile, I'll use all rubber as they seem to grip better on smooth surfaces.

Also, Other than slick surfaces, I can't say my BD ever really moves. I guess I have a pretty light touch...
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Sounds like you lead-footed drummers need the spikes that go on the front hoop. They are reversible, rubber and spike
Ah the the ye olde bass drum anchor. I use one on these on my 60's Luddy BD. The legs were replaced by someone and the feet are teflon coated because they just slide. Gibraltar do a good anchor, had no problems since.

Runaway bass drum, nightmare!

Always carry a rubber bottomed rug in the boot of my car for the kit. Haven't wrecked a floor..........yet!
 
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