Rubber bass drum feet vs spikes

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I'm curious as to how many guys use the rubber bass drum feet in lieu of the spikes.

The reason I ask is because when Andy was at my place earlier in the year, of course he noticed that I removed his really cool bass drum leg attachment, the foot part that houses the rubber part of the feet. As nice as it's designed, I don't use rubber feet, so I unscrewed it from the bass drum leg, which just leaves a spike. That foot was getting in the way of where I needed to put a cymbal stand leg, so I removed it.

I could tell Andy was a little deflated that I removed it considering the hours and cost spent designing and manufacturing it. IMO, it could be eliminated because my guess is not enough people use rubber feet to warrant putting them on. I never used the rubber feet and I'm betting hardly anyone else does too.

So I'm taking a poll to see if that's truly the case.

So rubber feets, talking the bass drum only here...yay or nay?
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
If the spike goes through the rug or mat and gets somebodies floor , hardwood or tile, it may get expensive. My rubber feet haven't moved an inch on my carpet
 

Tommy_D

Platinum Member
I use it half way as well. The spike digs in to the rug and the rubber stops the spike from completely going through the rug.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
I have a 65 Slingerland bass drum with no rubber feet at all, just spikes. Works fine.

I have maybe 1/4 inch of the spike protruding from the rubber on another BD.

In reality I think one could do without the rubber, but of course one would always need a decent thick rug under.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Interesting. More people use the rubber than I thought. I have no use for them. I use a thin indoor outdoor carpet. I'm not aware of any damage to the stages I play, but I'll look.

I remember reading a story about the re-flooring of a famous concert hall (whose name eludes me now) where the stage was messed up from the upright bass players spike digging into the stage.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
I use the spikes.

But I leave the rubber feet on and screw them up so they are just slightly touching the floor.
That way everyone thinks I'm protecting the floor.

(You can't play a Who song without bass drum spikes!)


.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Interesting. More people use the rubber than I thought. I have no use for them. I use a thin indoor outdoor carpet. I'm not aware of any damage to the stages I play, but I'll look.

I remember reading a story about the re-flooring of a famous concert hall (whose name eludes me now) where the stage was messed up from the upright bass players spike digging into the stage.
those and cellos have rods on them but most also have rubber tips. I have also seen cellos using a t-shaped cross like item that locks behind the front legs of the chair and then has several holes drilled half way through to put the rod in.
 
M

Matt Bo Eder

Guest
Ever since I got smart and keep a small office rug in my truck to use for the kit (you never know when you'll show up at a venue and there's no carpet for the kit, so I bring my own) I've always used the rubber feet. I never have a problem.

When I was younger, I did use the spikes a lot, until I messed up a really nice wood floor at a public facility. I felt guilty about that.

But in reality, the spurs on the bass drum aren't really what keeps the bass drum from creeping forward (although it works really well). If you have an old skool pedal with spurs on it, that really works. The clamp on the hoop keeps the drum from flying forward when you hit it, but your own weight keeps the pedal in place. And having a pedal plate with either rubber on the bottom, or in DW's case, velcro, really helps to keep the pedal in place.
 

TTNW

Pioneer Member
I use it half way as well. The spike digs in to the rug and the rubber stops the spike from completely going through the rug.
I do this.

I, like Bo, have also scratched up a nice stage floor once and felt sheepish about it.
 

WallyY

Platinum Member
Rubber feet. No spikes unless it's sliding.
Hihat, however is a different story. I use the spikes often because my hihat likes to walk on me unless I have a good rug or spikes.
I won't buy another hihat without spikes.
 
M

Matt Bo Eder

Guest
Rubber feet. No spikes unless it's sliding.
Hihat, however is a different story. I use the spikes often because my hihat likes to walk on me unless I have a good rug or spikes.
I won't buy another hihat without spikes.
I take it you have the DW9500? I believe those are made out of concrete!
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
I keep the rubber feet adjusted so that the spike just penetrates the carpet. But, like Bo, I've found that the spikes on the pedal really do all the work. Like the BD legs, the spikes of the foot pedal go less than 1/2 way thru the carpet.

GeeDeeEmm
 

porter

Platinum Member
Troublemaker!

Do you really think the rubber is doing anything?
If the spike goes through the rug or mat and gets somebodies floor , hardwood or tile, it may get expensive. My rubber feet haven't moved an inch on my carpet
That ;)

My 9000 pedals have velcro on them – as annoying as it is to move, it does stabilize the position quite a bit, so I have my pedal spikes retracted.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I can't do the pedal spikes. I toss them usually, one less thing to rattle. I don't like what they do to the angle of the pedal, plus it put's torque on the BD hoop. OK I'm splitting hairs, but I' all about that.

Many many times, when I go to break down, my pedal clamp is totally loose, and sometimes my pedal even crept away from the hoop partially. It must not affect me. Still, I want it to stay secure, and I can't believe I don't notice it. So pedal spikes wouldn't help me there.
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
I always use rubbers. The spikes can go right through a carpet and damage what's underneath. I use the inexpensive rubbers on my Ludwigs, which sometimes split, but are easy enough to replace.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I would suggest a thicker carpet and not those walk-off mats you see in front of stores. Those things are too slick anyway. Deep pile is the way to go. Pedal sinks in, legs sink in, and so does the hi hat
 
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