Round Over Bearing Edges

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
I'm confused with descriptions and terminology.
I find my roundover edged drums to have more attack (whatever that means, focus?) and articulation than the straight 45º edges I have. the 45º edges are more open and airy. Like the difference between die cast and triple flange.

The 45º edges don't have more tuning range. The tuning range seems to be related to the drum. I have a set of Cheap Sonors with 45º edge and they sound bangy at higher tunings, but the Nice German Sonors still have a pronounced fundamental at higher tunings. My Pearl Reference Pures don't tune up as well. They sound too clean at higher tunings and then they get noisy when I go a little higher. They can sometimes have a weird overtone that lingers at high tuning.

I don't prefer roundover edges for my typical preferred sound.
It seems that your slightly confusing experience with 45 vs roundover edges is due to the cheap Sonors not having quality edges, or they're out of round...there's many other factors that influence the sound.

If you take a higher quality shell with a 45 bearing edge, you'll find they do in fact have a larger tuning range. (That's not to say cheap shells with 45 can't sound good too.)

Your Pearl Reference Pures use 3 different bearing edges depending on the sizes. Sharp 45 for snares, rounded 45 for rack toms, full rounded on floor toms and bass. Do you remember which drums were giving you trouble?

Reference Pure bearing edges
 

Invicta

Junior Member
It seems that your slightly confusing experience with 45 vs roundover edges is due to the cheap Sonors not having quality edges, or they're out of round...there's many other factors that influence the sound.

If you take a higher quality shell with a 45 bearing edge, you'll find they do in fact have a larger tuning range. (That's not to say cheap shells with 45 can't sound good too.)

Your Pearl Reference Pures use 3 different bearing edges depending on the sizes. Sharp 45 for snares, rounded 45 for rack toms, full rounded on floor toms and bass. Do you remember which drums were giving you trouble?

Reference Pure bearing edges
Bit off topic here but I am actually not a big fan of pearl reference bass drum sound and it's likely due to the full rounded over edges. It blooms beautifully but I don't hear the attack of most bass drums.
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
Bit off topic here but I am actually not a big fan of pearl reference bass drum sound and it's likely due to the full rounded over edges. It blooms beautifully but I don't hear the attack of most bass drums.
That's roundover edges in a nutshell, and why some people love 'em and some people hate 'em.
 

WallyY

Platinum Member
It seems that your slightly confusing experience with 45 vs roundover edges is due to the cheap Sonors not having quality edges, or they're out of round...there's many other factors that influence the sound.

If you take a higher quality shell with a 45 bearing edge, you'll find they do in fact have a larger tuning range. (That's not to say cheap shells with 45 can't sound good too.)

Your Pearl Reference Pures use 3 different bearing edges depending on the sizes. Sharp 45 for snares, rounded 45 for rack toms, full rounded on floor toms and bass. Do you remember which drums were giving you trouble?

Reference Pure bearing edges
It's probably because the cheap Sonors, The Sessions, are wider diameter and straight wall 45º, Where the German Sonors can be straight wall 45º but because the shell is smaller, it doesn't choke. The Sessions are made properly for what they are. The edges and construction are correct. They should have a back cut with their standard diameter shells to sound good at different tunings other than low.
 

Chunkaway

Silver Member
Bit off topic here but I am actually not a big fan of pearl reference bass drum sound and it's likely due to the full rounded over edges. It blooms beautifully but I don't hear the attack of most bass drums.
interesting to hear this. Personally, there is not much I hate more than clicky, attack heavy bass drums. I want to hear the boom of the bass drum, not the click of the beater hitting the head.

I would assume this preference has a lot to do with the music one plays.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
I don't have time to chip in with the detail this thread deserves, but suffice to say, I've done a fair bit of work in this area.

Effective tuning range is not a product of bearing edges, but they're part of the equation.
 

Invicta

Junior Member
interesting to hear this. Personally, there is not much I hate more than clicky, attack heavy bass drums. I want to hear the boom of the bass drum, not the click of the beater hitting the head.

I would assume this preference has a lot to do with the music one plays.
I definitely don't want to hear only a click but I also don't want to hear only a boom. I want to get articulation AND body. Balance.
 

dboomer

Senior Member
There are a lot of moving pieces at play here. But there are a couple of simple ones you can try

If you bury your beater you will get more thud than the boom if you let it bounce off quickly

You will get more tone by hitting an inch or two above or below dead center. Dead center will get you thud

You will get more tone and less thud with a front head that does NOT have a hole.
 
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