Roland HD1 Pedal Problem

Eric M

New member
My Hi Hat and Kick pedals have both packed up on me. The kit has lain unused for 6 months and it was fine then but now nothing. l have tried the cuts and Vaseline trick on the rubber pad to no avail. If I plug in an FD7 pedal both work OK. Any thoughts?
Eric
 

Eric M

New member
Not sure what a piezo sensor is but it certainly is not a switch. It is a big rubber boot affair which presses on a flat strip.
 

bongodoctor

Member
There are two types - a piezo detects the vibrations and increases the signal as you press harder, a switch is either on or off. On these silent pedals the bass drum is usually a piezo and the hi-hat is a switch. I have the Yamaha equivalent. The piezo shouldn't be damaged by being left - unless it got wet or damp, but the switch in the hi-hat is very delicate and if it got clogged with dirt or dust it might not work properly. You might be able to see a small rubber sensor under the pedal, check to see if there is any dirt or debris over it. It seems unlikely both pedals would just stop working - so maybe try resetting the drum module to factory settings and make sure they are plugged into the right inputs because a bass pedal won't work in a hi-hat connector and vice-versa. Other test would be to plug the pedals into a different brain or module to see if they work there - the bass drum pedal should work in any of the Tom or snare inputs too...
 
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Kj8

New member
My Hi Hat and Kick pedals have both packed up on me. The kit has lain unused for 6 months and it was fine then but now nothing. l have tried the cuts and Vaseline trick on the rubber pad to no avail. If I plug in an FD7 pedal both work OK. Any thoughts?
Eric
Sorry to revive an old thread but I've just fixed one myself. Usually this problem arises because the rubber actuator inside the pedal hardens over time. This means it will only work if you kick the pedal hard, or it may not work at all. Rubber loses its natural oils over time and this causes it to harden. The replacement part is cheaply available on eBay, but before you sink any money try these two things. Carefully remove the pedal from the frame. You need a drum key for this. Then remove the frame from the pedal using a hex/Allen key. Then undo the FIVE cross head screws holding the bottom plate to the case. If you don't remove the middle cross head screw you will break the pin holding the actuator. Be careful not to damage the flat cable as you remove the casing. The rubber actuator is now ready to remove. If the rubber is going white with age try some silicone spray to soften and revive it. I just use a silicone waterproofing aerosol like you'd use to waterproof boots or coats. Leave this to soak in and repeat several times. It will replace the natural oils. Petroleum based products damage rubber in the long term so don't use Vaseline or oil on this part. Top tip is that you can use the same silicone spray to revive tired rubber drum pads and cymbals too. It is amazing to see them return to look like new! To soften the actuator use a hairdryer or fan heater to soften the rubber by gently heating it for several minutes. Slowly is the key here, don't overcook it. It will soon rather miraculously regain its flexibility. Please don't make cuts in the actuator like some people suggest. I made that mistake on my FD8 and had to buy a new actuator! Clean the dust off the inside of the pedal with a lightly moistened cloth. Now reassemble and all should work as the maker intended. Eventually the rubber will perish beyond revival, then you have no choice but to replace it but this fix should work fine for a few years. You may need to repeat it from time to time.
 
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