Rock Vs Groove

Anon La Ply

Renegade
thanks for dealing with my arrogant statements like a gentlemen
No problem, I have broad shoulders.
Good one, guys.

It's rare that 1) an attackee can be so mellow (Long Fuse is a good name) and 2) an attacker can pull back. A refreshing change from the usual internet escalations. Drummers rock (or was that groove?)

Longfuse, I found your OP a bit basic too, no offence. Henri covered most of it IMO.

I think it helps to think about why music is named the way it is.

Frinstance, rock ... rocking ... back and forth, in and out - boom bap boom bap - strong quarter accents. Groove means you're locked into a rut and implies unshakeable continuity of flow - it's doesn't suggest one way or another whether the beat is rocking (ie. digging in to those quarters) or more syncopated. So rock can groove, eg. John Bonham. Notice that people talk about Phil Rudd being a groove rocker too? Another rock band that plays a lot of mid tempo tunes with a lot of heavy digging in on the quarter notes.

Tempo is the elephant in the room when it comes to dancing. Funk is normally mid tempo and there's plenty of time for dancers to sway and shimmy. If you try to shimmy to uptempo rock it's going to turn out like belly dancing.

As for nodding to funk, does anyone know what you call that move where, instead of "rock nodding" (bobbing your face up and down leading with the forehead), you push your face forward leading with the chin, almost like a pecking motion? Funk bassists do it all the time.


polka can groove for gods sake ......ask Bermuda :)
... By the way, Polka doesn't groove...it 'Polks' (now that's pedantic!) :^)
When I saw Al play they launched into this hard rocking prestissimo polka that was a whole lot more bob than sway.
 

toddmc

Gold Member
So what's the general consensus- is "groove" or "feel" something you can learn or just something you're born with? (After watching videos of myself playing I have come to the conclusion that I have neither)!
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
To me, groove is the catchall, rock is the feel classification within it. For something to rock, it has to groove.
 

Longfuse

Senior Member
I think it helps to think about why music is named the way it is.

Frinstance, rock ... rocking ... back and forth, in and out - boom bap boom bap - strong quarter accents. Groove means you're locked into a rut and implies unshakeable continuity of flow - it's doesn't suggest one way or another whether the beat is rocking (ie. digging in to those quarters) or more syncopated. So rock can groove, eg. John Bonham. Notice that people talk about Phil Rudd being a groove rocker too? Another rock band that plays a lot of mid tempo tunes with a lot of heavy digging in on the quarter notes.

Tempo is the elephant in the room when it comes to dancing. Funk is normally mid tempo and there's plenty of time for dancers to sway and shimmy. If you try to shimmy to uptempo rock it's going to turn out like belly dancing.

As for nodding to funk, does anyone know what you call that move where, instead of "rock nodding" (bobbing your face up and down leading with the forehead), you push your face forward leading with the chin, almost like a pecking motion? Funk bassists do it all the time.

.
All very good points. I agree, what I posted is a bit simplistic,and obviously there's a lot of crossover, but awareness of body movement (regardless of what I posted) can only be a good thing.

One drummer who I found totally amazing when I got the Art of Brushes DVD is Billy Hart. After unpacking the disc, I slammed it in the machine and whizzed through to get an overview. I was in a rush and didn't want to disturb anyone so the sound was off. When Hart was doing his thing I stopped whizzing and watched his performance, mesmerized. Despite not hearing a note he was playing, I could feel his groove. He was literally dancing behind that kit. Such a graceful player.
 
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