Ringo Starr

Dhango

Member
I don't intend to sponsor no one and if a moderator think that I'm breaking any forum rule, well, he can delete this post.
I found in YouTube some videos of a japanese guy known by the name of batmankozyy. He uploaded several Beatle songs in wich he plays Ringo's parts. Ok, for all those people that think that Ringo Starr was a mediocre lucky guy who got the spot as a Beatles drummer just by chance, take a look at those videos. This japanese fellow plays the parts note-by-note and let me tell you: he shows exactly what Ringo was, a fantastic drummer with more than a few very good fills, not in the common path perhaps but right on time and even complicated at some point. Just take a look at those videos and you'll see what I'm talking about, just watch this guy playing "Come together", see what he does and tell me again than Ringo was a mediocre drummer. ¡Long live Ringo!
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
I don't intend to sponsor no one and if a moderator think that I'm breaking any forum rule, well, he can delete this post.
I found in YouTube some videos of a japanese guy known by the name of batmankozyy. He uploaded several Beatle songs in wich he plays Ringo's parts. Ok, for all those people that think that Ringo Starr was a mediocre lucky guy who got the spot as a Beatles drummer just by chance, take a look at those videos. This japanese fellow plays the parts note-by-note and let me tell you: he shows exactly what Ringo was, a fantastic drummer with more than a few very good fills, not in the common path perhaps but right on time and even complicated at some point. Just take a look at those videos and you'll see what I'm talking about, just watch this guy playing "Come together", see what he does and tell me again than Ringo was a mediocre drummer. ¡Long live Ringo!
Links please... so we can appreciate Mr batmankozyy's takes on Ringo's parts, thanks :)
 

Dhango

Member
Oh, your welcome Mad, and wait until you see more videos, this guy is really good. ¡He can play "Drive my car" all by himself and it's a three parts recording! And again: ¿Ringo, a mediocre drummer? ¡¡¡JA!!!
Enjoy it.
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
I said it before,and I'll say it again.Any drummer who thinks he/she can do it better,please post a vid doing it note for note Ringo's way,and then a vid doing it "better" than Ringo did.You just have to use the SAME EXACT TEMPO and ARRANGEMENT.

Although Ringo's imput was welcome by his bandmates,most of the time the songwriter/producer already had it in his head of what the tune should sound and FEEL like.The latter component of that formula is why the Beatles....recruited Ringo,and not the other way around.

Take note Ringo haters.

Steve B
 

Dhango

Member
I said it before,and I'll say it again.Any drummer who thinks he/she can do it better,please post a vid doing it note for note Ringo's way,and then a vid doing it "better" than Ringo did.You just have to use the SAME EXACT TEMPO and ARRANGEMENT.

Although Ringo's imput was welcome by his bandmates,most of the time the songwriter/producer already had it in his head of what the tune should sound and FEEL like.The latter component of that formula is why the Beatles....recruited Ringo,and not the other way around.

Take note Ringo haters.

Steve B
EXACTO, they needed the best they knew at that moment and ¿who was that drummer? ¡Ringo! And one more thing: he was always ready and willing to try anything, ANYTHING that John, Paul or George or even George Martin asked him. He never said no, he tried everything, he played all the stuff he knew and then some. That's what makes him so unique. As I said a few weeks ago, he was a team player with his very own talent and through that talent he complemented the others perfectly. It's impossible to think of The Beatles without Ringo.
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
EXACTO, they needed the best they knew at that moment and ¿who was that drummer? ¡Ringo! And one more thing: he was always ready and willing to try anything, ANYTHING that John, Paul or George or even George Martin asked him. He never said no, he tried everything, he played all the stuff he knew and then some. That's what makes him so unique. As I said a few weeks ago, he was a team player with his very own talent and through that talent he complemented the others perfectly. It's impossible to think of The Beatles without Ringo.
I have noted before that it's hard to tell much about Ringo's playing because he is turned down so far in the mix that you often can't hear him.

Ringo is a good example of a performer who did well for himself, was in the right place at the right time and has made lasting contributions to music and popular culture for 50 years.

But in my opinion, and in the opinion of society outside of this board, Ringo isn't a very good drummer. In my opinion, lots of people would have been able to drum for the Beatles with more verve and finesse. Ringo wasn't really bad but I don't think he was all that great as a musician either. Ringo's influence as the drummer for the most popular band in history is undeniable but I find his playing - when I can hear it - to be bland and too simple. I realize my opinion is counter to what most people say when they express an opinion about Ringo on this board.
 

aydee

Platinum Member
I have noted before that it's hard to tell much about Ringo's playing because he is turned down so far in the mix that you often can't hear him.

Ringo is a good example of a performer who did well for himself, was in the right place at the right time and has made lasting contributions to music and popular culture for 50 years.

But in my opinion, and in the opinion of society outside of this board, Ringo isn't a very good drummer. In my opinion, lots of people would have been able to drum for the Beatles with more verve and finesse. Ringo wasn't really bad but I don't think he was all that great as a musician either. Ringo's influence as the drummer for the most popular band in history is undeniable but I find his playing - when I can hear it - to be bland and too simple. I realize my opinion is counter to what most people say when they express an opinion about Ringo on this board.
...

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Anon La Ply

Renegade
In my opinion, lots of people would have been able to drum for the Beatles with more verve and finesse. Ringo wasn't really bad but I don't think he was all that great as a musician either. Ringo's influence as the drummer for the most popular band in history is undeniable but I find his playing - when I can hear it - to be bland and too simple.
I see where you're coming from, DMC. Personally, I like simplicity when it's original, smart and has good energy. It comes down to a listener's musical priorities.
 

Dhango

Member
Oh, please ¿are we still arguing about this?

I have noted before that it's hard to tell much about Ringo's playing because he is turned down so far in the mix that you often can't hear him
I still can't find where it's so far in the mix. Please, check out your equalization, play on Please, Please Me, and then With the Beatles, and then Revolver and then Abbey Road and then Rubber Soul and then Let It Be. Remember: there were only four of them ¡he can't be mixed that far!

Ringo is a good example of a performer who did well for himself, was in the right place at the right time and has made lasting contributions to music and popular culture for 50 years
You could say the same about Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, Bill Wyman(the Stones had no bass player), Mitch Mitchell(when he met Hendrix), Bob Dylan turning electric, etc., etc. Add the name of your preference. It is always a matter of being at the right at the right moment, the good Lord doesn't play by coincidences.

But in my opinion, and in the opinion of society outside of this board, Ringo isn't a very good drummer.
¿What society? Young people today is more aware of who Ringo was, what he played and when and with whom.

In my opinion, lots of people would have been able to drum for the Beatles with more verve and finesse.
Not in 1962 in Liverpool, or England, for instance. Come on, you really couldn't imagine Ginger Baker playing with the Beatles, do you?

Ringo wasn't really bad but I don't think he was all that great as a musician either. Ringo's influence as the drummer for the most popular band in history is undeniable but I find his playing - when I can hear it - to be bland and too simple. I realize my opinion is counter to what most people say when they express an opinion about Ringo on this board.
You can ALWAYS hear Ringo with the Beatles or after, just pay attention. ¿Bland and simple? With all due respect, based on your user name ¿what kind of a drummer do you like? It isn't all about technique, speed and decibels.

PS: please, no offense intended. Take a look at that guy that I mantioned in an early post, see what he does. He does Ringo, he plays like Ringo and by watching him you'll realize how good Ringo was. And still is, thank God for that.
 

SquadLeader

Gold Member
I don't understand how 42 years after the band's breakup people still don't get Ringo.
Well said! Nor me...especially people who can play the instrument.

I can understand my colleague, who is a halfwit and never done anything in his life, thinking that Ringo is pants on drums.

I can't understand people who play the damn instrument thinking the same.

And I note the Lennon quote being traipsed out again...Lennon was joking. I believe he clarified many years later that he was joking. The Beatles did that...they joked around.

I often liken our guitarists playing to that of Eric Morecambe in the Andrew Previn sketch "your playing all the wrong notes", "No Andre, I'm playing ALL the right notes...but not necessarily in the right order". But I'm only joking. Why can't people understand this?

Lennon wasn't writing a critique on Ringo...he was making a throwaway, clown's, comment.
 
A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
I have noted before that it's hard to tell much about Ringo's playing because he is turned down so far in the mix that you often can't hear him.

Ringo is a good example of a performer who did well for himself, was in the right place at the right time and has made lasting contributions to music and popular culture for 50 years.

But in my opinion, and in the opinion of society outside of this board, Ringo isn't a very good drummer. In my opinion, lots of people would have been able to drum for the Beatles with more verve and finesse. Ringo wasn't really bad but I don't think he was all that great as a musician either. Ringo's influence as the drummer for the most popular band in history is undeniable but I find his playing - when I can hear it - to be bland and too simple. I realize my opinion is counter to what most people say when they express an opinion about Ringo on this board.

your points and opinions are always valid DMC....and I for one respect them

but honestly who cares if we think he is good or bad

he is on all those records...influenced millions of players....sold millions of drum kits for Ludwig among other companies

and basically singlehandedly changed the way drummers were perceived and the way they played rock n roll in the early to mid 1960s

he was good for drumming, drummers, and drum companies

thats good enough for me
 

Piebe

Senior Member
Ringo played the drums just fine, naturally he wasn't a technical drummer, because the Beatles being a pop band didn't need that. Who knows Ringo plays super fast double bass in his secret metal band at home? Listen to Love me do and notice the baseline being so easy a monkey could play it.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
While Starr himself has been the first to acknowledge the technical limitations of his drumming for the Beatles, the overall effect of his contribution has received high praise from notable drummers. Starr said, "Whenever I hear another drummer I know I'm no good. I'm no good on the technical things ... I'm your basic offbeat drummer with funny fills. The fills were funny because I'm really left-handed playing a right-handed kit. I can't roll around the drums because of that."[47] Martin's version was, "Ringo hit good and hard and used the tom-tom well, even though he couldn't do a roll to save his life", although Martin later added, "He's got tremendous feel. He always helped us to hit the right tempo for a song, and gave it that support — that rock-solid back-beat — that made the recording of all the Beatles' songs that much easier."[47] In 1968,[48] Martin praised Starr's drumming on Sgt. Pepper, calling him "probably ... the finest rock drummer in the world today."[49] Lennon said, "Ringo's a damn good drummer. He always was a good drummer. He's not technically good, but I think Ringo's drumming is underrated the same way as Paul's bass playing is underrated."[47] McCartney sent Starr a postcard on 31 January 1969 (the day after the band's performance on the roof of Apple Studios), stating: "You are the greatest drummer in the world. Really."[50][nb 1] Readers of Rolling Stone magazine voted Starr as the fifth-greatest drummer of all time.[51]
Drummer Steve Smith extolled Starr's qualities beyond the technical, in terms of his musical contribution as drummer:
Before Ringo, drum stars were measured by their soloing ability and virtuosity. Ringo's popularity brought forth a new paradigm in how the public saw drummers. We started to see the drummer as an equal participant in the compositional aspect. One of Ringo's great qualities was that he composed unique, stylistic drum parts for the Beatles' songs. His parts are so signature to the songs that you can listen to a Ringo drum part without the rest of the music and still identify the song.[52]
Starr influenced Phil Collins,[53] the drummer for Genesis, who said:
Starr is vastly underrated. The drum fills on the song "A Day in the Life" are very complex things. You could take a great drummer today and say, 'I want it like that.' He wouldn't know what to do.[54][55]
In September 1980, John Lennon said this about Starr:
Ringo was a star in his own right in Liverpool before we even met. He was a professional drummer who sang and performed and had Ringo Starr-time and he was in one of the top groups in Britain but especially in Liverpool before we even had a drummer. So Ringo's talent would have come out one way or the other as something or other. I don't know what he would have ended up as, but whatever that spark is in Ringo that we all know but can't put our finger on — whether it is acting, drumming or singing I don't know — there is something in him that is projectable and he would have surfaced with or without the Beatles. Ringo is a damn good drummer.[56]
Many drummers acknowledge Starr as an influence, including Steve Gorman of the Black Crowes, Don Henley of The Eagles, Dave Grohl of Nirvana, Jen Ledger of Skillet, Max Weinberg of the E Street Band, Danny Carey of Tool, Liberty DeVitto of Billy Joel's band, Nicko McBrain of Iron Maiden, Eric Carr of Kiss, Phil Rudd of AC/DC, Orri Páll Dýrason of Sigur Rós,[57] original/former Dream Theater drummer Mike Portnoy, Pedro Andreu of Heroes del Silencio and others.[55]
In his extensive survey of the Beatles' recording sessions, Mark Lewisohn confirmed that Starr was both proficient and remarkably reliable and consistent. According to Lewisohn, there were fewer than a dozen occasions in the Beatles' eight-year recording career where session "breakdowns" were caused by Starr making a mistake, while the vast majority of takes were stopped owing to mistakes by the other three members.[55] Starr is considered to have influenced various modern drumming techniques, such as the matched grip, tuning the drums lower, and using muffling devices on tonal rings, as well as placing the drums on high risers for visibility as part of the band.[52]
For the band's second recording session with Starr as a member on 11 September 1962, producer George Martin replaced the studio-inexperienced Starr with session drummer Andy White to record takes for what would be the two sides of the Beatles' first single, "Love Me Do" backed with "P.S. I Love You".[58] Starr played tambourine on "Love Me Do" and maracas on "P.S. I Love You" for this session.[59] McCartney took over the drums on "Back in the U.S.S.R." and "Dear Prudence" from the White Album (1968) after Starr had walked out,[60] and also played the drums on "The Ballad of John and Yoko", recorded on 14 April 1969, since only he and Lennon were immediately available to record the song.[61] Starr commented that he was lucky in being "surrounded by three frustrated drummers".[62]
 

Dhango

Member
Mad About Drums watched a few videos(Mad: i hope you've seen much more) that I found in YouTube. People: watch those videos, then climb on your kit, it doesn't matter wich one(a 22x14/14x5,5/13x9/16x16 would be ideal) and reproduce what the man did. And please, do it with grace, rythm, timing and joy like he did.

PS1:excuse my somewhat broken english, be patient.
PS2:remember to muffle those drums. Use a pack of cigarettes, a harmonica case box, a tea towel or a blanket.
 

handito

Senior Member
Hey guys.

As a a musician I feel that I have to comment on the Ringo thread.
I used to be very much a "drummer", however, in the negative way. I cared more about practicing incredibadiddles than playing songs and at that time I was a Ringo basher. Now I have my own quartet where we are four songwriters and that has really opened my eyes, or ears, to what an amazing musician Ringo Starr really is. When playing with the Beatles he played songs or arrangements rather than grooves or beats, and in my opinion that is much more important. Ringo complimented the songs and played just what was needed to make beautiful music. Anyway, that was just my 2 cent.
 

rlyman59

Junior Member
I've been listening to the Beatles all my life. I have read hundreds of books, including those on drummer Pete Best. Before I go on I must say I have always thought Ringo was a pretty good drummer. I posted this on another site in response to the 13 reason to respect Ringo and 20 years ago I would have agreed with those reasons, but I since found that most of what Ringo and the other British invasion drummers were doing was simply copying the rockabilly or rock n roll drummers of the 50s. Even Ringo has said in interviews "Nothing I was doing was new. It was just me copying my idols" I don’t agree with almost all thirteen of the 13 reasons. It's nothing against Ringo, they just simply aren't true.

Number one, the drums were extremely heavy during the 1950s. I don’t know where the myth got started that they didn’t have much in the way of drums back then, but it’s all wrong. And many of the drummers from back then had a much deeper and lower and louder sound than the Beatles, and I’m talking about hundreds of songs. People need to research into 50s rock n roll a lot more. When Eddie Cochran would play, his drummer would often join him up on stage during interviews. 50s drummers weren't all in the shadows.

Number Two, many other drummers during that time used Ringo’s style of holding the sticks. He in no way was the first.

Number three, Drummers played on high risers long before the Beatles used them. If you do a little research, you’ll be able to find pictures of the Beatles with Pete Best on drums, playing up on a high rise. If anyone wants to see the pic of pete on the high rise it's...
http://www.beatlesource.com/savage/1961/61.11.10 towerb/61.11.10tower.html

Number four, Ringo played his first Beatles song on a Premier drum kit. He changed to Ludwig because session drummer Andy White used them on Love Me Do and Ringo was impressed with their sound. This is right from interviews with Ringo and Andy White.

Number five, again you need to go back, and I of course mean the original recordings, and listen to the 1950s rock n roll especially the rockabilly style of the late 50s. Youtube has a 1000+ examples. Check out the original SUSIE Q by Dale Hawkins, 1958. The drums on that song are as loud anything the Beatles ever recorded. I’m sure even Ringo would agree- but really it’s not the fault of anyone who thinks otherwise. They never play most 50s rock n roll on the radio. The AM channels cherry pick out the soft stuff and play it to death, maybe throw in a little Chuck Berry or so. They pulled the lions teeth and took out its claws, and play this 300 song watered down version of 50s rock.

Number six, I keep hearing this perfect tempo thing but it sounds like hype. If you can’t keep a beat you can’t play in the studio. That was allegedly the main complaint about Ringo and Pete. Martin said that neither could keep a beat in time with the Bass player. Ringo recorded on 9/4/62, and Martin said he was out of time and he put Andy White on the next version of Love Me Do in 9/10/62. McCartney said in a 1989 interview that Martin had never Produced for a rock n roll band and he expected the drums to sound like the drums he was used to on the Cozy Cole and Frank Sinatra records he’d heard. When Best and Starr played the Club style of rock n roll it was completely alien to him. The Beatles didn’t know this at the time, and Pete got axed (Though some of it was jealousy over popularity) to satisfy Martin. The popularity issue was definitely a factor in the Best firing. When Best would do the singing at venues where there was no high rise, the other Beatles had to sit down on the stage so the crowd could see Pete. They never did that for Ringo. They found out after hiring Starr (Took them ten weeks to hire a new drummer, they asked 6 other guys before they got to Starr, one of them Bobby Graham, who would later become a legendary sessions drummer) that the problem was Martin and not Best, but the change had already been made. Interestingly, though, when the Beatles came into the studio on 9/4/62 the producers and engineers had no idea that the Beatles were changing drummers. They had only told the Beatles that they weren't satisfied with his drums, and had not told them to replace him. On that day no sessions drummer was present. Best would have played that day. They had changed the arrangement of Love me Do over the last 10 weeks and Best would have pretty much played the same version as Ringo. Here's the link showing the Beatles sitting on the stage while Pete sings and plays drums... http://www.beatlesource.com/savage/1962/62.04.05 cavern/62.04.05cavern.html

Number seven, no comment

Number eight, no comment .

Number nine, I think his style gave them a signature sound but it hardly pushed drumming into new frontiers.

Number ten, more hype and says the same thing as eight. Of course he was a very good drummer and very professional. He wasn’t a world shaker or the best there ever was, and he would have been better if Abby Road’s studios weren’t so primitive. The Beatles often commented that the American Studios were always six years ahead of them. Abby Road was using equipment that the American rockers used in 1958. They didn’t get 8 track recording equipment until halfway through the White Album, something American studios had back in 64. I suppose it was because they were stuck in an EMI contract that said they had to record in England. The Stones managed to escape it and come to the states to record in 1964.

Number eleven, again, they didn’t run to Ringo as soon as Martin expressed his dissatisfaction with Pete, and as I said, they didn’t quite understand why he didn’t like Pete. Martin approached them after the 6/5/62 recording session and said he didn’t like the arrangement of the song Love Me Do. The Beatles were trying to play it in the Style of Bruce Channels hit "Hey Baby," a favorite of theirs at the time, (if you listen to Hey Baby on youtube you kind of get the feel of what they were trying to do on this early version of Love Me Do) and after that session Martin expressed to Paul Mccartny off to the side that the drummer wasn’t keeping perfect time with the Bass, something none of the club bands did, not with the frenzied punk beat of the music played in those venues. Paul said in the 1989 interview in the Book Beatles Recording Sessions that they were pretty much four in floor with as heavy bass as possible, commenting, "We used to break stages with it." McCartney said in that same interview that we're happy with his drumming. He's played great for the past two years. (700 live performances as their drummer, at a average 5 hours on stage a day) Martin said, "He's not accurate enough for the studio, and that was as far as the conversation went. He would say the same thing about Ringo after the 9/4/62 session. Somehow Martin learned what the rock drummers were trying to do and let Ringo play (He later said "I felt he wasn't a great drummer but for our purposes he would do fine.", plus it was cheaper than hiring a session drummer which they hadn't done for the 9/4/62 session. After the 6/5/62 session John, Paul, and George spent the next 10 weeks looking for another drummer behind Pete’s back. The first guy they asked was Bobby Graham, the Drummer for Joe Brown and The Bruvvers, a band that had a number one hit song called "A Picture of You." Graham refused to quit the Bruvvers because he said they had a hit song already and the Beatles did not. You can google this. Graham would go on become one the Best session drummer in Rock history, play on all the Hermans Hermits, Kinks, Animals, Petula Clark, etc, etc,, he probably ended up on more hits than Ringo, but of course the sessions guys never got their names on the records, all on the QT. As the summer of 62 worn on, after asking several other drummers and gossip getting back to Pete at one point, the Beatles decided they couldn’t turn back and called Ringo, who had sat in for them twice, once in March when Pete had the flue and again in May when Pete had a funeral because of a death in his family, both lunch times slots at the Cavern. So, Starr, did become and excellent drummer for them but he wasn't their first choice. Most people ignore the 10 week lag time in how Ringo came to the Beatles. Starr would later say in interviews that he played with the Beatles every two week for several month up until Pete's sacking but evidence later surfaced, because of the meticulous records kept of their live shows by Pete and Neil Aspinal (Not sure if the last name spelling is right) that Pete only missed 4 gigs during the two years, and Ringo had only sat in on those two. Neil of course stayed with the Beatles for their entire career and was a good friend of the Beatles, so he is a neutral source. He confirms that Pete missed only 4 gigs during the two years.

I have to agree with 12 for the most part. I think there a might a couple of other songs that maybe McCartney played on but Ringo was their primary drummer. McCartney was an excellent drummer, though. He played all the instruments on the "band on the run" album and those drums on that LP are pretty good. Before Ringo joined the band, Pete would come to the front of the stage and take the mic to sing Peppermint Twist. Best would actually dance the twist while singing this song, while McCartney took over on drums. There are pictures of this on the internet. This made Pete a pretty big hit when he came to the forefront, hence more reason for jealousy. http://www.beatlesource.com/savage/1962/62.04.05 cavern/62.04.05cavern.html

13, well, who else were they gonna get but Ringo. He’s played with them for 8 years and did a great job, and they were buddy’s. I’m a big Beatles fan and over the last 15 years, thanks to searching out the original artists from the Beatles BBC recordings and overwhelming amount of 50s rock n roll that has hit Youtube, I have become a big fan of the music the Beatles grew up with. If it wasn’t for the Beatles at the BBC, I would still be listening to classic rock radio. Since I went backward, before the Beatles, 70s and 80s music has never sounded as good as it used too. It’s the biggest influence the Beatles have had on me.
 
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