Ringo Drumming Live - Compilation

Mustion

Senior Member
Never really watched him drum before, funny enough.

I like his side-by-side sweeping technique when he plays the hat. Is that a thing?

One of the wide shots in that video shows the audience going totally berserk. That must have been such an experience.
 
I like his side-by-side sweeping technique when he plays the hat. Is that a thing?
He's the only one I've ever seen really do it, other than when people are imitating him or occasionally covering an early Beatles tune. It's a fun technique and definitely gives a nice swingy feel, but in my experience, it can also become a habit really easily.

I thought I recalled his drums being quite small on those early tours--which would account in part for how high he appears to be sitting--but I just checked out a gear page and it claims the bass is 20", so I guess he really did just sit really high.
 

johnwesley

Silver Member
I sit tall on my kit too. Makes me feel more in control. Mentioned before I saw the Beatles in August 66 in their last American concert at Candlestick Park San Francisco. They played an impressive 23 minutes!!! But they did get 14 songs in. Or maybe it was 12.

BTW.....look at the price of the ticket
 

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newoldie

Silver Member
This is the great B J Wilson. They do things in the extreme in England. LOL





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That's really high up. Although the Gene Krupa, Louis Bellson and even some Buddy Rich videos show that they also sat pretty high up relative to the snare drum, and with their elbows held high . You'd think the stick rebound would be greater sitting waist high to the snare, but all these guys had incredible rebound-- so what works for the masses might not be relevant to the greats.
 

Bonham to the moon

Senior Member
As I've gotten older, I've become more and more inclined to respect restraint and finesse over the octopus throwing around blinding fast chops. It's impossible to hear a Beatles song and not want to start moving around. That's the mark of a great drummer.
 

Peedy

Senior Member
As I've gotten older, I've become more and more inclined to respect restraint and finesse over the octopus throwing around blinding fast chops. It's impossible to hear a Beatles song and not want to start moving around. That's the mark of a great drummer.
Wise words indeed. 100% with you on both statements.

Pete
 

ricky

Senior Member
I am amazed at how high he sat. His seat is higher than his snare.
He's the only one I've ever seen really do it, other than when people are imitating him or occasionally covering an early Beatles tune. It's a fun technique and definitely gives a nice swingy feel, but in my experience, it can also become a habit really easily.

I thought I recalled his drums being quite small on those early tours--which would account in part for how high he appears to be sitting--but I just checked out a gear page and it claims the bass is 20", so I guess he really did just sit really high.
I think part of the reason, or maybe all the reason, from what I have read,

was so that you could see him better.

Ringo was a "Starr"!
 

STAXfan

Junior Member
Never really watched him drum before, funny enough.
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I like his side-by-side sweeping technique when he plays the hat. Is that a thing?

One of the wide shots in that video shows the audience going totally berserk. That must have been such an experience.
If you watch any of The Beatles live performances on television from 1964 - 66 you can see he was an excellent drummer. And you can see why he was the drummer the band wanted back in 1963. He was just a perfect fit for The Beatles. He was one of the coolest drummers to watch. He had such a unique style. The washy HH and Ride. His sense of time was amazing. If you watch Ringo on those TV appearances back in 64 you can easily see why he was a Beatle. He was so much fun to watch because he always looked like he was having the time of his life. Head bobbing from side to side. He was always smiling. Can you imagine Pete Best playing with the band on the Ed Sullivan shows with his head down looking at the floor, not smiling and playing interesting drum parts? Ringo was the right drummer! And after they stopped touring and focused just on recording, Ringo became so creative with his drum parts.
 

STAXfan

Junior Member
If you watch any of The Beatles live performances on television from 1964 - 66 you can see he was an excellent drummer. And you can see why he was the drummer the band wanted back in 1963. He was just a perfect fit for The Beatles. He was one of the coolest drummers to watch. He had such a unique style. The washy HH and Ride. His sense of time was amazing. If you watch Ringo on those TV appearances back in 64 you can easily see why he was a Beatle. He was so much fun to watch because he always looked like he was having the time of his life. Head bobbing from side to side. He was always smiling. Can you imagine Pete Best playing with the band on the Ed Sullivan shows with his head down looking at the floor, not smiling and playing interesting drum parts? Ringo was the right drummer! And after they stopped touring and focused just on recording, Ringo became so creative with his drum parts.
That's really high up. Although the Gene Krupa, Louis Bellson and even some Buddy Rich videos show that they also sat pretty high up relative to the snare drum, and with their elbows held high . You'd think the stick rebound would be greater sitting waist high to the snare, but all these guys had incredible rebound-- so what works for the masses might not be relevant to the greats.
Good points! I've heard many people including Ringo say that he liked the downbeat size of the 20" bass 12" tom and 14" floor tom because it made him look taller behind the kit. Buddy Rich had horrible posture when he played. When you look at video and photos of Gene Krupa from back in the 30's and 40's it's obvious that really good drum stools didn't exist back then. I don't think Ringo had good posture in the early touring years of The Beatles but if you watch him in his all star band you can see he sits up straight and has good posture. I've heard him in interviews saying that he has a personal trainer that sometimes even travels on his tours so he can exercise while on tour. I wouldn't be surprised if he practices yoga because he seems to sit up tall and be very at ease when he's behind his kit.
 
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