Ringing Metal Snares Tuning and Heads

dwsabianguy

Senior Member
Felt-on-a-piece-of-tape sounds like Paul Leim "stole" idea from virtually every drum manufacturer prior to 1970 - an internal muffler made out of felt you could turn on or off.
Not at all. Those mufflers press the felt into the head into the heads. The felt is on a strip of gaff tape, which is attached to the hoop, so the felt is only held down by gravity, and flies off the head when you hit the drum. The closest thing is the Remo Dave Weckl muffler, but that is spring loaded. It's an open sound, where internal mufflers are very much not.
 

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
Interesting!!! Thanks!!!

Not at all. Those mufflers press the felt into the head into the heads. The felt is on a strip of gaff tape, which is attached to the hoop, so the felt is only held down by gravity, and flies off the head when you hit the drum. The closest thing is the Remo Dave Weckl muffler, but that is spring loaded. It's an open sound, where internal mufflers are very much not.
 

wraub

Well-known member
Visible at several points in this (interesting, imo) video...




edit- I should also mention that I did this after seeing the video, and I am a fan of this method. I tried it on one tom, and immediately removed the Moongels I'd been using and did it to the other toms and the snare drum. It works, it works well imo, and I like it. :)


Felt-on-a-piece-of-tape sounds like Paul Leim "stole" idea from virtually every drum manufacturer prior to 1970 - an internal muffler made out of felt you could turn on or off.
Not at all. Those mufflers press the felt into the head into the heads. The felt is on a strip of gaff tape, which is attached to the hoop, so the felt is only held down by gravity, and flies off the head when you hit the drum. The closest thing is the Remo Dave Weckl muffler, but that is spring loaded. It's an open sound, where internal mufflers are very much not.
 
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Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
That snare rings! Or is that overtones? When he plays snare just by itself you can hear ring/ overtone. But in mix you can't hear it. I'm not sure that felt really does much. Or else it does a lot and that snare without it is a bell. But I don't mind the sound of the ring/ overtone.

Cool video of actual pro musicians getting paid to play. I learned a lot.

Visible at several points in this (interesting, imo) video...




edit- I should also mention that I did this after seeing the video, and I am a fan of this method. I tried it on one tom, and immediately removed the Moongels I'd been using and did it to the other toms and the snare drum. It works, it works well imo, and I like it. :)
 

wraub

Well-known member
A lot there does seem to hide in the mix, but, for me, it's night and day different.

I find in practice it kinda works like a"mechanical compressor"- When you hit the drum, the tape/felt (gate) bounces and opens and you get the full sound of the drum, then the tape/felt (gate) falls back down and controls a lot of the overtones.
I found with Moongel that it can damp the batter head in a not unpleasant way, but the head is damped. With this method, the batter is damped when you're not playing, and immediately after the strike of the stick. but when you actually hit the drum it opens up and sings more than with Moongel... again, ime. It's louder, too.
It's also good in that it opens up more with bigger hits, but falls back at the same speed, and with softer hits barely moves at all. I also found that this can be varied somewhat with different lengths of tape.

It cost me the length of time to find a loose felt and some tape to try it... It's definitely useful imo.



That snare rings! Or is that overtones? When he plays snare just by itself you can hear ring/ overtone. But in mix you can't hear it. I'm not sure that felt really does much. Or else it does a lot and that snare without it is a bell. But I don't mind the sound of the ring/ overtone.

Cool video of actual pro musicians getting paid to play. I learned a lot.
 
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