Rimshots on every snare hit

jimb

Member
Interesting examples above and not terribly obvious on some. My gripe is with that over tight snare tone that sounds like a tin can being hit. Anyway that's another thread.
 

s1212z

Silver Member
For tom rimshots, definitely a timbale like effect is what I think of...textural and percussive-esq. So maybe it shows up in those type of genres a bit more.

Couple examples, just noticed they are all Yamaha endorsers w/ diecast.

Manu Katche has talked about tom rimshots. He has some examples after the 2:45 mark


Dafnis Prieto


Antonio Sanchez

 

jansara

Junior Member
Rimshots don't have to be loud. My sound consists of the majority of backbeats being what I call "gentleman rimshots".

Which to me means playing rimshots with no more volume than center hits. Or even less volume than center hits because they cut so nice. I do it most of the time because I like the added shell tone. People say they like the sound of my snare drum. What they are really saying is "I like the frequencies you are pulling out of that drum". Because that's what's really happening. It's me not the drum lol.
This.
 

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
In a live situation, I play rims on every hit (except for certain ballads or orchestral.) I think I learned to do that because it cuts through the mix and conveys energy without being loud. It's just become part of my style, and part of my sound.
This.
Certain kinds of music need it & it adds to the energy. Other genres it's just overpowering & your fellow bandmates will probably let you know.
 

TK-421

Senior Member
Just stop it, please.

I can understand if you have songs that are truly best served by constant rim shots, but nobody wants to hear that **** on every song, especially if you're not playing death metal. Even death metal fans get sick of it. And really, folks...if you think your snare needs constant rimshots to sound badass, you either need another snare or you need to up your badass game, and I've been around long enough to bet money that it's not the snare.

Phew! Glad I got that off my chest...been wanting to say that ever since I got on here.

So who's with me here?
Out of curiosity, are the rim shots that bother you only from snares that are cranked up way high? Because to me there's a world of difference between that high-pitched gunshot crack rim shot vs. a rim shot from a snare tuned to a medium pitch or lower. All of my snares are tuned to medium, and I play rim shots almost exclusively. And my snare hits sound and feel great, with a meaty crack that's not high-pitched and piercing like a highly tuned snare too often delivers.
 

moxman

Silver Member
I use rimshots here and there for effect. Often if I'm playing old rock n roll or shuffles or swing depending on the tune. They really give a shot of life to some of these types of beats and are as fun as hell to play.
But I'd never play ALL rim shots.. that would be annoying as hell.. for both band members and the audience. If the goal is to get a punchy snare sound doing that - just tune the snare properly and use dynamics.
 

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
Out of curiosity, are the rim shots that bother you only from snares that are cranked up way high?
Probably.
My snare is cranked up pretty good for most shows. I do have a warm, mahogany Gretsch that I use for the blues band I occasionally fill in for. That snare isn't tuned for combat like my Rogers & no rim shots for the music I play with them.
It all boils down to using the right equipment & tuning for the music you're playing.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
FWIW rimshots on toms are like hens teeth in my vocabulary. I'm limited there. I don't mind hearing them but I rarely feel the need for them.

I only do them on my smallest toms a-la the timbale effect...
 

Quai34

Junior Member
I like cracky snares and If I want more crack, I use rim shot...
 

JimmyM

Platinum Member
Interesting examples above and not terribly obvious on some. My gripe is with that over tight snare tone that sounds like a tin can being hit. Anyway that's another thread.
Out of curiosity, are the rim shots that bother you only from snares that are cranked up way high? Because to me there's a world of difference between that high-pitched gunshot crack rim shot vs. a rim shot from a snare tuned to a medium pitch or lower. All of my snares are tuned to medium, and I play rim shots almost exclusively. And my snare hits sound and feel great, with a meaty crack that's not high-pitched and piercing like a highly tuned snare too often delivers.
The head crankers who hit the side for max ping are definitely a turn off to me, even when they do center hits. Loved it when Elvis C/Steve Thomas and Stewart Copeland came along because nobody was doing it. Now so many people do it that it's so refreshing to hear fat snares again when you do. I had no idea how many were hitting rimshots, though, so I learned something.

BTW, let me put in a good word for center hit rimshots, too.
 

Bull

Gold Member
As strange as this thread seems to me, it reminds me that many on this board claim to have never broken a stick or cracked a cymbal. We have lived in very different worlds. lol
 

JimmyM

Platinum Member
God, I so suck on rimshots. Doesn't help that my snare rim is a diecast stick chewer, either. I think I'm just going to hit the side and pretend I'm doing rimshots :D
 

Chunkaway

Silver Member
It's the sound of modern rock and pop, as established by great drummers like Jeff Porcaro, Andy Newmark, Kenny Aronoff, and a whole bunch of 70's funk icons.
A centre hit is an equally valid sound, but not for some genres and tends to be more of a retro sound.
It's not really the drummer's decision. If the song requires a sharp precise backbeat the songwriter or producer will expect rimshots.bviously ghost nets are not played as rimshots.
Exactly this. About 12 years ago I was recording a demo for an up and coming alt. Country band. The producer and engineer had worked with Wilco and Ben Harper, so they definitely knew what they were doing. I specifically remember the engineer asking me to play rimshots throughout an entire song. On another song, he didn’t want any rimshots. Just depends on the song and the vibe.
 

JimmyM

Platinum Member
Exactly this. About 12 years ago I was recording a demo for an up and coming alt. Country band. The producer and engineer had worked with Wilco and Ben Harper, so they definitely knew what they were doing. I specifically remember the engineer asking me to play rimshots throughout an entire song. On another song, he didn’t want any rimshots. Just depends on the song and the vibe.
Well I guess I can always use the wood shavings for repairing screw holes in my instruments.
 
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