Rim shots. Yamaha vs roland

defregano

Member
Hey guys. Has anyone extensively played Roland kits vs the Yamaha dtx pads and knows if the Roland rims transmit less shock? have the Yamahas and I avoid doing rim shots on the snare cause it never fails to mess with my wrists. I see the new dtx pads have a smaller rubber surface like the Roland’s and was wondering if I’d be better off with the new yamahas.
Thanks!
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
(a) Which Yamaha pads? - Yamaha make a load of different ones., including a bunch of rubber ones of different compounds (they all feel very different) and the excellent TCS silicone ones - mounted in various shells (incl wood), and even mesh. - BUT if you are talking rimshots then it's the rim you are concerned about and not the head, one assumes. Yamaha pads typically have rubber rims so have less shock than an acoustic kit, obs! (but - again - these rims are different across the options). Note also Yamaha pads will give you 3-zones....

(b) If you are having wrist issues it's likely you're not using flexible sticks - switch to maple wood - and go as thin as is comfy for you hand/ finger size. Flex: maple > hickory > oak

- at the end of the day rim-shotting a pad is gonna be less hard on your hands than rim-shotting a steel hoop on an acoustic ;)
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
My bad. It’s the silicone pads with the thick rubber rim. For some reason rim shots on acoustic drums don’t give me the pain symptoms that e-drums do.

Weird - so solid rims don't hurt and rubber ones do? (seems backwards) Glue some aluminium to the rubber? ;)

Possibly guessing you're smacking the rubber harder as it's more forgiving, or you're not picking up the sound or feel so hitting harder to make up for it. When smacking solid metal you're subconsciously more cautious. Who knows?

Edrums aren't acoustics - different instrument - so some playing tweaking can help.

...and check the stick thing. Get onto maple if you have wrist problems. Avoid hickory/oak/Aheads...
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
I have a cheap Yamaha DTX series with rubber pads. I use Zildjian anti-vibe sticks. It helps reduce vibrations to my hands.
And yes, if the volume in my head phones is low I tend to hit harder to try and bring more volume out of the drums. And of course it is a wasted effort.

.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I couldn't get the Alesi Forge to play rim shots-it's hard for me to hear it in the monitors. They turn it up for me to hear it in morning practice-then, since I'm so hard of hearing I'm too loud in mix, so they push me back down-I hear bits and pieces of it but my wife says it sounds fine. I can hear whacking the pads-but I guess a reflex for more volume I get carried away whacking it harder sometimes LOL (which I'm not a hard hitter). I've always had disdain for e kits but now I'm playing one at a church it's a lot of fun-and when I do hear it-it does sound awesome. The bass player who bought it said it was real inexpensive.

I may buy one for quiet practice at home. It has a completely different feel from an acoustic kit and though toms and bass drum is fine I miss real cymbals and a snare-so think maybe hybridize the two-have a good monitor for toms and kick that I can blend with real snare and cymbals. What e-kit heads I don't use I can use for special effects or special tunings for different songs like Big band stuff. So in essence have a real and e kit side snare, e toms, e bass, real everything else and pads not in use special effects cymbals, etc. I hate this idea with a passion but it keeps coming up in my head haunting me-blend of analog and digital-damn cyborg drum kit.
We will have to become like insects in behaviors to persist at these high densities-and it will help survive all the pollution and "whatnot", and hybridized with computers and technology to become "Computer bugs"ROFL-that's too funny. I'm sorry I couldn't help myself. After reading some of these recent neuro papers with cochlear implants and the brain relearning how to hear and what not, since when we hear music and play an instruments-we do so in our heads whether we act on it or not. That's why listening to a song is so critical to learning it correctly. Anyways they should be able to put jack in. the back of your head like the Matrix and capture those motor impulses to emulate body motion and directly play your e kit in your brain-how cool would that be. Even have to activate sensory visual cortex for a holographic e kit you would see and play in your head and output comes out the monitors (maybe bluetooth). I bet we would still play our own unique ways just because of minor differences. They are probably working on stuff like this for gaming I bet?
 

Doraemon

Well-known member
I may buy one for quiet practice at home. It has a completely different feel from an acoustic kit and though toms and bass drum is fine I miss real cymbals and a snare-so think maybe hybridize the two-have a good monitor for toms and kick that I can blend with real snare and cymbals.

Have you tried any new or more expensive kits lately? While they won't be like acoustics, they could feel far different from an old budget kit. Especially a bigger 2-3 ply mesh snare, or one with positional sensing versus a tiny rubber pad from ages ago. There are also ways to add triggers to "real" cymbals or e.g. those low-volume ones.
 

roncadillac

Member
I couldn't get the Alesi Forge to play rim shots-it's hard for me to hear it in the monitors. They turn it up for me to hear it in morning practice-then, since I'm so hard of hearing I'm too loud in mix, so they push me back down-I hear bits and pieces of it but my wife says it sounds fine. I can hear whacking the pads-but I guess a reflex for more volume I get carried away whacking it harder sometimes LOL (which I'm not a hard hitter). I've always had disdain for e kits but now I'm playing one at a church it's a lot of fun-and when I do hear it-it does sound awesome. The bass player who bought it said it was real inexpensive.

I may buy one for quiet practice at home. It has a completely different feel from an acoustic kit and though toms and bass drum is fine I miss real cymbals and a snare-so think maybe hybridize the two-have a good monitor for toms and kick that I can blend with real snare and cymbals. What e-kit heads I don't use I can use for special effects or special tunings for different songs like Big band stuff. So in essence have a real and e kit side snare, e toms, e bass, real everything else and pads not in use special effects cymbals, etc. I hate this idea with a passion but it keeps coming up in my head haunting me-blend of analog and digital-damn cyborg drum kit.
We will have to become like insects in behaviors to persist at these high densities-and it will help survive all the pollution and "whatnot", and hybridized with computers and technology to become "Computer bugs"ROFL-that's too funny. I'm sorry I couldn't help myself. After reading some of these recent neuro papers with cochlear implants and the brain relearning how to hear and what not, since when we hear music and play an instruments-we do so in our heads whether we act on it or not. That's why listening to a song is so critical to learning it correctly. Anyways they should be able to put jack in. the back of your head like the Matrix and capture those motor impulses to emulate body motion and directly play your e kit in your brain-how cool would that be. Even have to activate sensory visual cortex for a holographic e kit you would see and play in your head and output comes out the monitors (maybe bluetooth). I bet we would still play our own unique ways just because of minor differences. They are probably working on stuff like this for gaming I bet?
I have an alesis nitro mesh I use at band rehearsal, it's weird because when I play that kit with headphones the rim of the snare sounds like a loud rimshot backbeat yet when I play the kit through speakers the rim of the snare sounds like a cross stick/rim click. And it's not just me, I even showed the band members the difference between speakers and headphones. Possibly something with the headphone output vs the stereo/mono line outs change the frequency?
 

Doraemon

Well-known member
I have an alesis nitro mesh I use at band rehearsal, it's weird because when I play that kit with headphones the rim of the snare sounds like a loud rimshot backbeat yet when I play the kit through speakers the rim of the snare sounds like a cross stick/rim click. And it's not just me, I even showed the band members the difference between speakers and headphones. Possibly something with the headphone output vs the stereo/mono line outs change the frequency?
Headphones often enhance the bass to sound pleasing for certain genres.. Every time I switch to speakers I have to remix the whole thing, the hats become quiet, toms too loud.. Best is to save a user kit for each.
 

roncadillac

Member
Headphones often enhance the bass to sound pleasing for certain genres.. Every time I switch to speakers I have to remix the whole thing, the hats become quiet, toms too loud.. Best is to save a user kit for each.
I've noticed the same. Cymbals and snare (pad) become too quiet and snare rim changes tone and toms become too loud when I use speakers. When I use headphones the overall mix is pretty great right "out of the box".
 
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