Rim, or block?

Vandalay

Member
I'm finding on slow songs as wells as some country stuff, it's difficult to keep my stick in the proper position to keep a nice consistent sound. Does anyone use blocks as a replacement for playing the rim?
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
Ii have, but it's not the same. There's a little bit of shell resonance and snare response that's not present with the block.

I think that the Groove Wedge is probably the best solution for folks who struggle to wring a good rim sound from their snare, and I have no clue why nobody picked up the slack once Yamaha stopped making them. The closest product out there is the Rim Riser, which I haven't heard as much about. Seems to get some good reviews, though.
 

beatdat

Senior Member
Check out this thread for some alternative ideas (particularly the one used by forum member Bermuda): http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/showthread.php?t=135622. With some luck and proper positioning, perhaps you could be able to strike the rim AND the block at the same?!

Personally, I think it's important to spend some time working on developing a consistent cross-stick; it's a valuable technique that will help with both your precision and accuracy. Spend a little time to find out the exact position where your stick needs to be to produce the best cross-stick sound and, if need be, trace it on your drum head with a marker.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
Personally, I think it's important to spend some time working on developing a consistent cross-stick; it's a valuable technique that will help with both your precision and accuracy. Spend a little time to find out the exact position where your stick needs to be to produce the best cross-stick sound and, if need be, trace it on your drum head with a marker.
+1000
what he said. Then you won't have to bring a block with you everywhere you go.
 

J-Boogie

Gold Member
Its funny, I think most drummers, myself included, make the mistake early on of figuring its not really a technique, you just lay your stick down and bam, u got an even, nice sounding cross stick! Like not writing a run on sentence, its something that takes some practice and thought.

I agree with beatdat, important to spend some time...yup
 

Juniper

Gold Member
I mark a line on the diameter of my sticks with a marker pen where it’s the perfect point for a cross stick.

Really does help with a consistent sound, especially when cross sticks aren’t all the way though a song and you’re changing at times.

Having that reference really helps/forces you to get the perfect sound each time, straight away. No adjustments needed.

Brilliant for the studio especially.
 

Les Ismore

Platinum Member
I mark a line on the diameter of my sticks with a marker pen where it’s the perfect point for a cross stick.

Really does help with a consistent sound, especially when cross sticks aren’t all the way though a song and you’re changing at times.

Having that reference really helps/forces you to get the perfect sound each time, straight away. No adjustments needed.

Brilliant for the studio especially.

A great option, also the rim is everywhere you go. You won't get better at your cross stick technique using a block.

A block is just another thing to haul around and set up, tho it is consistent and easy to play.

If you're doing 35 songs a night in a club and 2 use a cross stick sound, I'd go for the mark on the stick as opposed to setting up a block. A big stage where consistency needs to be there and the amount of gear you're not setting up isn't a problem, a block can sound real good.
 
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