Ride & Hats: Dampening Slightly for Stick Articulation

johnbarnesiii

Senior Member
Hello,

I have a Zildjian K Dark Medium 22" ride and Zildjian Prototype 15" Fat Hats. I love their sound, but I'm trying to get just a LITTLE bit more stick articulation out of them without having to put a tiny bit of tape underneath. I'm a semi hard-hitting player, in a rock/heavy-rock band.

The ride & hats both have great wash, the hats have cool sloshiness. Don't really want to lose that. I'm simply trying to bring in a hint of more articulation for closed hats and also for focused ride playing, like more articulative 8th notes, etc.

Seeking an alternative to using tape. Guessing there are some more evolved methods now. Heard about Cympad and wondering if this is a way to go? I don't really want less volume though. I simply want slightly more stick articulation.

Thanks!
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
Hello,

I have a Zildjian K Dark Medium 22" ride and Zildjian Prototype 15" Fat Hats. I love their sound, but I'm trying to get just a LITTLE bit more stick articulation out of them without having to put a tiny bit of tape underneath. I'm a semi hard-hitting player, in a rock/heavy-rock band.

The ride & hats both have great wash, the hats have cool sloshiness. Don't really want to lose that. I'm simply trying to bring in a hint of more articulation for closed hats and also for focused ride playing, like more articulative 8th notes, etc.

Seeking an alternative to using tape. Guessing there are some more evolved methods now. Heard about Cympad and wondering if this is a way to go? I don't really want less volume though. I simply want slightly more stick articulation.

Thanks!
Try Moongel. A full-sized piece might be a bit much; try shaving off a bit from one end. If it's a bit expensively priced in your area, those sticky hand things out of the gumball machines are essentially the same thing (and work just fine for a quarter apiece).

 

SticksEasy

Senior Member
I second the moon gels. But if you really want a dry sticking sound put like 4 strips of masking tape. It won't leave a mark, comes off easy, and gives you the desired result.

I done a live recording with an old band, and I was using 14" extreme series hi hats by soultone. I loved setting them half an inch apart, turning the tilt screw and just whaling on them with quarter notes, but they were too loud and drowned stuff out because we weren't using mics.

So I smothered the underside of both hi hat cymbals with masking tape and got the perfect volume, and the feel I was after in the recording. It doesn't sound professional, and it works.

Just DON'T USE DUCT TAPE. It'll ruin your cymbals.
 

wsabol

Gold Member
I don't know what you can do about the hats other than drilling a small hole in the bottom cymbal. I don't think moongel will help with the chick sound, but it worth a shot.

I second the moongel for the ride though. I also agree not to use duct tape, but you can use packing tape or some other wide tape to muffle slightly.
 

Soupy

Silver Member
How about ball (or nylon) tip sticks? The exact effect varies from cymbal to cymbal, but should lead to brighter stick tone which may sound more defined and articulate.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Sounds like a technique thing to me, though. If you just want a 'tad' more articulation, I would think you could play that out of the cymbals, no?
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
Sounds like a technique thing to me, though. If you just want a 'tad' more articulation, I would think you could play that out of the cymbals, no?
Yes. By putting anything on a cymbal, you're not INCREASING the articulation...you're merely reducing what the cymbal will put out in terms of wash and volume. It may sound more articulate by comparison, but what you've actually done is taken away some other aspect of the sound that competed with the stick sound. If you really want a more articulate sound, you need to either:

1. Learn how to utilize the "click grip", which is how many of the jazz greats got an articulate, woody sound out of super-thin and super-thick cymbals.
2. Use a more articulate-sounding stick, either with a small round tip or nylon tip.
3. Get different cymbals.
 
A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
Yes. By putting anything on a cymbal, you're not INCREASING the articulation...you're merely reducing what the cymbal will put out in terms of wash and volume. It may sound more articulate by comparison, but what you've actually done is taken away some other aspect of the sound that competed with the stick sound. If you really want a more articulate sound, you need to either:

1. Learn how to utilize the "click grip", which is how many of the jazz greats got an articulate, woody sound out of super-thin and super-thick cymbals.
2. Use a more articulate-sounding stick, either with a small round tip or nylon tip.
3. Get different cymbals.
^ read and learn brethren

I'm curious how many here actually knew "click grip" exists
 

Chunky

Silver Member
I've never tried this and although I'm happy with my sound I think I'm going to give this a try just to hear the effects and learn a little.

I wouldn't dare drill a hole on my hats! Anyone done that? And does it improve the chick sound?
I find the action sound of my hi-hats played with the foot is nearly as loud as the chick! I like the setting of the pedal though but the sound is unsatisfactory... :s
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Yeah, you either do it with technique, or get different cymbals. I refuse to alter the way my cymbals sounds (which in this case, is just muffling it, whatever you do) with devices - if my hand can't do it, then I either don't do it, or get another cymbal that will.

How's that for a luddite response, eh?

;)
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
I'm curious how many here actually knew "click grip" exists
There used to be a really good YouTube video describing it, but it's been taken down. I learned from two different jazz cats in town, one showing me it, and the other showing me HOW to do it. Changed my drumming forever. Seriously.
 
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