Ride cymbal for recording metal?

Korpmannen

New member
What type of ride cymbal is suitable for recording metal? A thicker cymbal with a strong ping is the way to go obviously. I tend to prefer the paiste rides, however something like the Paiste rude power ride seems maybe too loud? Post your suggestions!
 

Al Strange

Well-known member
What type of ride cymbal is suitable for recording metal? A thicker cymbal with a strong ping is the way to go obviously. I tend to prefer the paiste rides, however something like the Paiste rude power ride seems maybe too loud? Post your suggestions!
I swear by my Paiste Alpha 20” Metal ride...does what it says on the tin:
(y):)
 

iCe

Senior Member
2002 Power Ride or the 2002 Heavy Ride?
Maybe even the Signature 22" Monad Ride (Danny Carey signature) or the Carl Palmer 20" Duo Ride. Those have a great ping as well.
Haven't played them, but judging from sound samples and recordings Paiste rides are 'all about that ping' :p
I do own a Paiste Sound Formula (predecessor the the Signature line) 20" Dry Ride and it also has a loud ping with a tad of dryness
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
What type of ride cymbal is suitable for recording metal? A thicker cymbal with a strong ping is the way to go obviously. I tend to prefer the paiste rides, however something like the Paiste rude power ride seems maybe too loud? Post your suggestions!
You typically need a working bell and good off-bell stick definition with control over the wash, as you're often playing blast-style beats where there are many notes in rapid succession.

The only cymbal I have owned that worked perfectly was the A-Custom 20" medium ride. I imagine that a stock A-ping ride would work as well.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
While I generally resist the notion that cymbals are genre-specific, I agree with @KamaK's recommendation for a ride that champions definition over wash. I would aim for maximum clarity, avoiding any vestige of trashiness. I would want each note to be focused rather than diffused.

If you prefer Paiste lines, a 2002 Power Ride or Heavy Ride, as @iCe suggests above, would be a viable option.
 

Dj magic d

Senior Member
second the recommendation on a Paiste Dry Ride, or a variation of it. I have a Paiste Signature Dry Heavy Ride 21", and i'm keeping it forever. Clear, loud ping and a killer bell. Cant beat it for any type of heavy music, but it records well too.
 

AZDRUMZ

Well-known member
I´m a Zildjian guy, so I recommend the 20¨ K heavy ride, 20¨ k session ride, any rock ride, or the mega bell ride they offer
 

Peedy

Senior Member
What type of ride cymbal is suitable for recording metal? A thicker cymbal with a strong ping is the way to go obviously. I tend to prefer the paiste rides, however something like the Paiste rude power ride seems maybe too loud? Post your suggestions!
Mea Culpa - I’ve never recorded metal.

But I’m guessing that you have something about you that makes you different. All of these suggestions are excellent, but you should pick one (I’d get two different ones) that are the mark of your own style and uniqueness.

Pete
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Well, the criteria is for recording, so literally you could use whatever sounds good for the track, so be ready to try different things. I read somewhere that both Roger Taylor and Freddie Mercury were such cymbal aficionados, that they'd try all kinds of different ones trying to find the right fit for the song. Most guys who record have a number of different things to try.

I know if you're talking about your particular live situation, then maybe the stereo-typical "I need loud thick pingy" ride cymbals works for you. But with the live sound technology available to everyone these days, you can still play what you're comfortable with and play any genre. Drums and cymbals can only get so loud in a live situation so everyone assumes you must have the biggest and heaviest to compete with the rest of the band, but that's no longer the case - most bands have reduced their stage noise by going with in-ear monitoring, so now you get to experience the chance of being relaxed to play the music because you no longer feel like you're fighting your way through the band to be heard.

So here's a wacky idea, and I have one of these, but the A. Zildjian 20" Light Ride, sounds alot like the rides you hear on alot of classic rock and metal - and it washes really good to with a reasonably loud bell (it's my second go-to cymbal when my 22" K Light Ride doesn't work). I think if you have relatively thin cymbals that wash/crash well, and get out of the way when you're not playing them, works better to help project the band musically.
 

Peedy

Senior Member
Well, the criteria is for recording, so literally you could use whatever sounds good for the track, so be ready to try different things. I read somewhere that both Roger Taylor and Freddie Mercury were such cymbal aficionados, that they'd try all kinds of different ones trying to find the right fit for the song. Most guys who record have a number of different things to try.

I know if you're talking about your particular live situation, then maybe the stereo-typical "I need loud thick pingy" ride cymbals works for you. But with the live sound technology available to everyone these days, you can still play what you're comfortable with and play any genre. Drums and cymbals can only get so loud in a live situation so everyone assumes you must have the biggest and heaviest to compete with the rest of the band, but that's no longer the case - most bands have reduced their stage noise by going with in-ear monitoring, so now you get to experience the chance of being relaxed to play the music because you no longer feel like you're fighting your way through the band to be heard.

So here's a wacky idea, and I have one of these, but the A. Zildjian 20" Light Ride, sounds alot like the rides you hear on alot of classic rock and metal - and it washes really good to with a reasonably loud bell (it's my second go-to cymbal when my 22" K Light Ride doesn't work). I think if you have relatively thin cymbals that wash/crash well, and get out of the way when you're not playing them, works better to help project the band musically.
Well said. I don’t care what everyone says, you’re all right.
 

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
Hit up Reverb/EBay et al & look for the Zildjian Z series Heavy Power ride. (Not to be confused with the new "Planet Z" as these are very different). Had a bell as big as your head & I challenge ANY guitar player whose amp is cranked to 11 to overpower this thing.

You might be hard pressed to find someone willing to sell it, but if you do, it'll do all you need for recording metal any day of the week and twice on Sunday.
 
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