Rhumbagirl's Grooves

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
I can think of much more reasons than just that one.



So you had to practice using books (note the plural number) and commons sense. Maybe I'm wrong but to me this sounds contradictory to "not being difficult at all".



I'm absolutely able to make sense of this:

View attachment 104241

...although to me this is much more readable- and comprehensible:

Code:
12,8: (142,72,230)  #8E48E6  srgb(142,72,230)
13,8: (143,73,231)  #8F49E7  srgb(143,73,231)
14,8: (144,74,232)  #904AE8  srgb(144,74,232)
15,8: (144,74,232)  #904AE8  srgb(144,74,232)
16,8: (144,75,230)  #904BE6  srgb(144,75,230)
17,8: (145,76,231)  #914CE7  srgb(145,76,231)
18,8: (146,77,232)  #924DE8  srgb(146,77,232)
19,8: (147,78,233)  #934EE9  srgb(147,78,233)
20,8: (148,79,234)  #944FEA  srgb(148,79,234)
21,8: (149,80,235)  #9550EB  srgb(149,80,235)
22,8: (149,80,235)  #9550EB  srgb(149,80,235)
23,8: (149,80,235)  #9550EB  srgb(149,80,235)
24,8: (159,73,244)  #9F49F4  srgb(159,73,244)
25,8: (145,81,221)  #9151DD  srgb(145,81,221)
26,8: (138,83,226)  #8A53E2  srgb(138,83,226)
27,8: (147,84,225)  #9354E1  srgb(147,84,225)
28,8: (150,76,233)  #964CE9  srgb(150,76,233)
29,8: (151,83,228)  #9753E4  srgb(151,83,228)
30,8: (142,76,225)  #8E4CE1  srgb(142,76,225)
[...]

...while this representation is much more accessible:

View attachment 104242

What I mean is that there's a use case for every representation of whatever data. Even a total noob could kind of "hear" this representation:

cubase011701-nMHaxC4X6047qg7Pl3c38WuIAquZ9jqT.jpg




Yes, me.



Yes, 10 years of piano lessons should count.



Again, I can think of lots of other reasons. One example is that notation has not too much connection between time and space while e.g. drum trackers, drum editors and drum tablatures do, which means that by just letting your eye walk over the sheet/display steadily the brain is able to figure the rhythm much easier. Downside is that lots of meta information around every single hit is lost - but, as I said, there's always a use case for whatever representation of data.
What he said 👍
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
High maintenance-Rhumba? You mean the girl who lives out in middle of nowhere and rides a bicycle? ROFL. She's methodical-I've always thought she was a scientist or engineer because of her analytical nature. No one would ever guess I'm a scientist who just casually meets me ROFL.
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
So here's Verse Groove v3 using the Groove Scribe tool. The Groove Scribe site doesn't appear to have a save option (like the Drum Machine site does), but it does allow a copy of a link to the groove, although I've got to store that link somewhere (here for now).


1620394267139.png

Here's the same in sextuplet notation:

1620394358499.png

For comparison, here is my tablature. First thing I notice is my tablature immediately highlights the fact that all the hits on the snare are 'L's. You can't see that with conventional notation.

Code:
Verse Groove v3:
|1.....2.....3.....4.....|1.....2.....3.....4.....|
       >           >            >           >    >
|R LR R  RL L  LR R  RL  |R LR R  RL L  LR     R  |   HiHat
|      L           L     |      L           L    L|   Snare
|o    o   o     o        |o    o   o     o    o   |   Kick
|+                    o  |+              o  +  o  |   HH foot
                                              ^^
                                              Replace 'RL' with ' R' on HH
 

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rhumbagirl

Senior Member
But I like the Groove Scribe.
- The triplet '3' groupings in the 8th note triplet version above make it obvious the kind of pattern being played on the HiHat. However the HiHat open notation 'o' gets lost in the groupings compared to the sextuplet '6' version.
- Looking at the tablature, I'm able to make any notation inventions my mind comes up with (eg my use of '^ ^^ ^' to denote a swung paradiddle). But outside of that, the tablature is not readily readable. On the contrary, with the sticking (albeit at the top of the staff) in the conventional version, I can still readily see the paradiddle pattern. Anyone who plays enough, can 'feel' the snare hand requirements within a standard rudiment like the paradiddle. And in practicality, professionals don't perform thinking about which hand hits the snare - more importantly is to continue to play in the present. If I get my paradiddle off the alternating, I've got the next bar to make that correction.
- The conventional format looks sexier, and it keeps us working with the tools the professionals use. Isn't that what we all need in the end?
- I like the Ctrl-V paste option. I didn't know we had that here on DW until @Sebenza mentioned it yesterday. Thanks. That makes Groove Scribe option possible. But we're still dependent on a tool outside of DW**.
- The tablature is a PITA to create. It would probably make a great tattoo under one's right bicep. I'm inclined to use Groove Scribe from now on though, especially since it has a play option. And a MIDI file can be downloaded - I'm hoping Drum Machine will let you upload the MIDI file to view a performance.

Thanks everyone for this ... mild disruption. High maintenance? ROFL

**This point is moot since the output of Groove Scribe is a screen shot which will maintain regardless of what happens to Groove Scribe in the future. Although the link may not work (but my tablature didn't offer playback anyways, so).
 

Sebenza

Member
Maybe you can survive by using the advanced edit on the hi hat and set it to open and get closer to what you want?

View attachment 104271
Weirdly I don't have that "Advanced Edit" option available to me. I believe I looked everywhere in the menus and tried it in two browsers, but it doesn't show up for me.

Kind of wanna have it too now, as I was using that site for quick transcriptions for some friends kid I've been teaching, and I always had to scribble little markers in the snipping tool for open hi-hats.
Anyone know what the problem might be? A browser issue?

Edit: After tinkering a bit just now, I found I can use the right mouse button to access more options, open hihats among them so problem solved.
 

Sebenza

Member
View attachment 104278

For comparison, here is my tablature. First thing I notice is my tablature immediately highlights the fact that all the hits on the snare are 'L's. You can't see that with conventional notation.

Code:
Verse Groove v3:
|1.....2.....3.....4.....|1.....2.....3.....4.....|
       >           >            >           >    >
|R LR R  RL L  LR R  RL  |R LR R  RL L  LR     R  |   HiHat
|      L           L     |      L           L    L|   Snare
|o    o   o     o        |o    o   o     o    o   |   Kick
|+                    o  |+              o  +  o  |   HH foot
                                              ^^
                                              Replace 'RL' with ' R' on HH
In the regular notation, you indicated the sticking...I'd consider the information that the snare hits are left hands, as clear as it could possibly be, no?

And without trying to rub people the wrong way...I have to say it's a good example of how regular notation is easier to read for me. I can't even imagine what a beat, fill or god forbid, a solo with toms that contains 32nd notes might look like, or how to notate buzzes or doubles, when you've got bar lines ( the | sign represents a bar line, right? ) for every part that don't line up with each other.
 

beet

Well-known member
Groove scribe notation key shows it’s options. Press the small key symbol to show them. Accents are available for many types.

90AE56C6-C701-46AC-8CCE-230DC068FC53.jpeg
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
I'd consider the information that the snare hits are left hands
I was talking about whether ALL the snare hits are left hands. You can't tell that as easily from conventional notation.
 
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