Rhumbagirl's Grooves

Sebenza

Member
Maybe it's because the online forum doesn't offer a tool to readily insert a music staff into a post, add notes to that staff, and markup the notation with stickings and accents. I don't consider taking a screenshot of a Sibelius render, saving it to a file, and dragging that file into a forum post, as being a tool readily available. Plus I don't have Sibelius or any comparable notation app.

The other thing is, and I've mentioned this above already, tablature doesn't need to be seen as a replacement for formal notation. It should be seen as a supplemental tool. I find it particularly helpful in recognizing particular stickings like paradiddles, repeating and/or alternating.
Musescore is free and as @beet mentioned, Groove scribe is also handy to quickly write down some basic stuff & stickings. Then just use the snipping tool and voila
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
This will convert automatically to music notation at the top. Use the advanced mode for more options.

This is slower to edit but does give quite a bit of options.

It HAS sticking patterns.

I like it, but if it ain't native to DW, then I don't consider it *readily available*. If I have to link to another site to share content, then the integrity of DW's content is dependent on the existence of that site and its content.

(Wow, so much blowback from a little tablature format I came up with LOL. @Supergrobi - how hard would it be to incorporate the above tool into DW's posting mechanism?)
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
Musescore is free and as @beet mentioned, Groove scribe is also handy to quickly write down some basic stuff & stickings. Then just use the snipping tool and voila
That's great but it's an extra file on my computer. I have to resize the snapshot to fit DW's size requirements - that itself requires an image processing app. When I take a snapshot, it populates my desktop (Mac). I have to clean that up at some point.
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
This will convert automatically to music notation at the top. Use the advanced mode for more options.

This is slower to edit but does give quite a bit of options.

It HAS sticking patterns.

I didn't see any sextuplets option on Groove Scribe, so I had to choose triplets and 8/4 time signature. Also no HH foot option.

This is the image insert of the PNG file from Groove scribe (@Supergrobi - any idea why it shows up dark like this?)
All Around The World - by Lisa Stansfieldpng.png
 

beatdat

Senior Member
Is the ability to read music, and especially purely rhythmic notation, become so rare that we need "tablature"? I picked it up by myself in the late eighties, early nineties by practicing with books and applying common sense...it's not at all difficult... I don't understand why there is a need for an alternative method of notating rhythms, when we've got a simple, clear and globally accepted way of doing it already?
Is there actually anyone here that finds that tablature stuff easier or faster to read, and if yes, have they even tried conventional notation at all or did they dismiss it right out of hand cause...ya know...it's old-fashioned....?
I agree with everything you say, but rhumbagirl makes some excellent points in turn.


@rhumbagirl, the round-about method you describe is a pain, for all the reason you've mentioned.

But, if DW did provide something similar to Drum Machine but with staff notation, would you use it instead?
 

Sebenza

Member
I didn't see any sextuplets option on Groove Scribe, so I had to choose triplets and 8/4 time signature. Also no HH foot option.

This is the image insert of the PNG file from Groove scribe (@Supergrobi - any idea why it shows up dark like this?)
View attachment 104243
Choose the 16th triplets option. And I just quickly used the windows snipping tool to take a snapshot of what I needed and then ctrl-v'd it into this post. Can't get any quicker than that
1620335001467.png
 

Supergrobi

Technical Supervisor
Is the ability to read music, and especially purely rhythmic notation, become so rare that we need "tablature"?

I can think of much more reasons than just that one.

by practicing with books and applying common sense...it's not at all difficult...

So you had to practice using books (note the plural number) and commons sense. Maybe I'm wrong but to me this sounds contradictory to "not being difficult at all".

I don't understand why there is a need for an alternative method of notating rhythms, when we've got a simple, clear and globally accepted way of doing it already?

I'm absolutely able to make sense of this:

GHex_Supergrobi.png

...although to me this is much more readable- and comprehensible:

Code:
12,8: (142,72,230)  #8E48E6  srgb(142,72,230)
13,8: (143,73,231)  #8F49E7  srgb(143,73,231)
14,8: (144,74,232)  #904AE8  srgb(144,74,232)
15,8: (144,74,232)  #904AE8  srgb(144,74,232)
16,8: (144,75,230)  #904BE6  srgb(144,75,230)
17,8: (145,76,231)  #914CE7  srgb(145,76,231)
18,8: (146,77,232)  #924DE8  srgb(146,77,232)
19,8: (147,78,233)  #934EE9  srgb(147,78,233)
20,8: (148,79,234)  #944FEA  srgb(148,79,234)
21,8: (149,80,235)  #9550EB  srgb(149,80,235)
22,8: (149,80,235)  #9550EB  srgb(149,80,235)
23,8: (149,80,235)  #9550EB  srgb(149,80,235)
24,8: (159,73,244)  #9F49F4  srgb(159,73,244)
25,8: (145,81,221)  #9151DD  srgb(145,81,221)
26,8: (138,83,226)  #8A53E2  srgb(138,83,226)
27,8: (147,84,225)  #9354E1  srgb(147,84,225)
28,8: (150,76,233)  #964CE9  srgb(150,76,233)
29,8: (151,83,228)  #9753E4  srgb(151,83,228)
30,8: (142,76,225)  #8E4CE1  srgb(142,76,225)
[...]

...while this representation is much more accessible:

supergrobi_80x80.jpg

What I mean is that there's a use case for every representation of whatever data. Even a total noob could kind of "hear" this representation:

cubase011701-nMHaxC4X6047qg7Pl3c38WuIAquZ9jqT.jpg


Is there actually anyone here that finds that tablature stuff easier or faster to read

Yes, me.

and if yes, have they even tried conventional notation at all

Yes, 10 years of piano lessons should count.

or did they dismiss it right out of hand cause...ya know...it's old-fashioned....?

Again, I can think of lots of other reasons. One example is that notation has not too much connection between time and space while e.g. drum trackers, drum editors and drum tablatures do, which means that by just letting your eye walk over the sheet/display steadily the brain is able to figure the rhythm much easier. Downside is that lots of meta information around every single hit is lost - but, as I said, there's always a use case for whatever representation of data.
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
I agree with everything you say, but rhumbagirl makes some excellent points in turn.


@rhumbagirl, the round-about method you describe is a pain, for all the reason you've mentioned.

But, if DW did provide something similar to Drum Machine but with staff notation, would you use it instead?
I definitely would as long as it conveyed the same information. For example, Groove Scribe will show stickings, but only as a row above the staff. I kinda like seeing 'R's and 'L's on the staff. Are you guys hell bent on disrupting the Rhumba order??
 

Supergrobi

Technical Supervisor
how hard would it be to incorporate the above tool into DW's posting mechanism?

Unfortunately it would be hard to implement but, more important, impossible to maintain regarding further updates to the forums software.
 

felonious69

Well-known member
Again, I can think of lots of other reasons.
One thing I have learned in my many moons on this sphere we live on is that people learn things differently from one another.
Your example of lines of code, and alternate lines of code (I think that's what that is), is a good example.
Rumor has it Paul McCartney doesn't read music, yet, in my mind, he's a musical genius.
I am 56. I wanted drums basically my whole life (after playing guitar by ear for a lot of it), and finally got a kit in June last year.
When I look at the Xs and Os and the vertical stick moving swiftly across the horizontal snare wires, it kinda baffles me.
When I watch someone doing it, I instantly get a far better grasp.
Back in 1993 I got an associates degree in electronics engineering. I NEVER read any of the books. I listened in class and I did the lab experiments and tests. I have never been able to learn much of anything from reading even though I can read fairly well. Problem is, I have the attention span of a bottle rocket...
ANY TOOL I CAN FIND that will help me (in any endeavor I choose), I am all for.
 

Supergrobi

Technical Supervisor
Your example of lines of code, and alternate lines of code (I think that's what that is)

First example is the binary representation of the Super Grover JPEG image viewed in a hex editor, second example is the RGB color of each pixel after the JPEG was rendered to a bitmap and the third one is the visual representation of the data on screen. The example was meant to display three different representations of the same data - although all three are readable they serve quite different purposes.
 

felonious69

Well-known member
First example is the binary representation of the Super Grover JPEG image viewed in a hex editor, second example is the RGB color of each pixel after the JPEG was rendered to a bitmap and the third one is the visual representation of the data on screen. The example was meant to display three different representations of the same data - although all three are readable they serve quite different purposes.
That's what I said! LOL
 

felonious69

Well-known member
I used to know binary, base 6, base 8, but I never used it in an employment role, so it's gone.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I had dysgraphia and dyslexia as a kid. I guess I still do just learned to accommodate. Reading I conquered really well but writing took longer- and now with age I see dysgraphic stuff returning. I suspect I have some dysmusia because though I read regular snd drum notation it’s slow going. It’s a visual sensory processing thing/impairment . My youngest daughter had some sensory processing issues in youth too but therapy fixed her up. Just wired a bit different.
 

Supergrobi

Technical Supervisor
@Supergrobi - any idea why it shows up dark like this?

Oops sorry, missed that one. Seems you're on dark or wallpaper theme? The service seems to create PNG with transparent background, you would have to edit the image in whatever graphics editor to add a white background.
 

beet

Well-known member
I didn't see any sextuplets option on Groove Scribe, so I had to choose triplets and 8/4 time signature. Also no HH foot option.
HH foot is there. In advanced edit, you can set HH foot or BD or both. Almost everything you asked for. I verified that 1/16 note triplets make a sextuplets “6” over the bar as @Sebenza said. See pic at bottom

Yes, we get that you’re high maintenance 😊.

D0F3FBBD-FBAD-4167-A9DF-A31926D39866.jpeg

E7D5FB78-D059-4574-A1E2-4EB038DB7F04.jpeg
 
Last edited:

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
It's drum tablature. It's limited so you have to use your imagination. A lowercase 'o' on the kick line indicates a note placement, however the same 'o' on the "HiHat foot" line indicates an OPEN position. HiHat and Ride patterns can be written with 'x', but if I'm trying to convey a certain sticking, I'll use 'R' and 'L' instead.

The good news is it works for people who don't get note durations from formal notation. Think of it as a format for sharing ideas, rather than "is this what I need to use to construct sheet music out of in a band setting?".

Perhaps this inspires a new tablature tool on DW (@Supergrobi?). Imagine a button that inserts a 4/4 grid with sextuplet divisions, with 2 toms, snare, kick, floortom, hihat, ride, hihat foot, cowbell, etc. Or a generic one that lets you name the parts. Then clicking on a box in the grid is akin to playing a note for that part.

EDIT: The benefit of drum tablature is everything is spatially notated, and therefore gives a more visual representation of grooves and stickings. I can understand how it could be difficult to sight read, but to interpret and share ideas, I find it very useful.
I bloody love your notation system. Even a thicky like me can follow it.
 
Top