Restoration of an old set of Ludwigs

topgun2021

Gold Member
That is cool, I have an old set I am tryng clean up for selling, you need to tell me how cleaning the chrome parts went.
 

intheruff

Senior Member
'you need to tell me how cleaning the chrome parts went. '

I used very fine steel wool to begin with. This works great and gets the shine back where the chrome is still in good shape. With these drums many of the parts are worn beyond help, but even so look much better when wooled. Where there was rust on the chrome the wool did remove some of that, in many instances the rust hadn't yet eaten all the way through the chrome. The Brasso went a little further and after soaking for an hour additional particals of rust came off. But, like I said, once the rust has destroyed the chrome its all over.

Initially I plan to use most original parts, whether marred by rust or not. I'll place those bad lugs where they aren't so noticable (backside or bottomside of drum). The hoops will go on the bottom and new hoops will be on the batter side. They'll look so much better, I just hope their new sound (because of putting the reso heads back on) matches their refurbished look.
 

Elvis

Silver Member
Dean... I'm using 220 red paper (the color has to do with the type of sand/rock I think). I have some of that waterproof black 440 that I may use to finish up those edges, but the 220 is pretting fine and probably suitable for those edges... I think. I like the belt idea and may try it if these things don't respond to the pressure from the rings and heads. I'd imagine the belt should be as wide as possible to spread the pressure of the cinch. The trick would be to get it tight enough to make a difference.
As far as the paint application, I'm going to spray the interior. I think that'll make for a thinner coat. At the earliest that'll be tomorrow.

Hey Dean... side note. I just bot AC/DC's Black Ice and am really enjoying their back to basics r&r. 'Snakes' is the title of an instrumental and I really don't know who did it. The cut I've got is probably an eight piece jazz band. Great groove to work off of.
Al,

The spray application sounds like the best idea. Are you using spray cans or an actual paint sprayer? (like the body shops use).
Thanks for the info on "Snakes". I'll have to look that one up. I assume your copy of that song doesn't say who performed it, eh?


Elvis
 

intheruff

Senior Member
Today saw the interior of the shells painted gloss enamel white. I used two rattle cans and not a compressor paint gun, as the job is small and a paint gun means a lot of cleaning. The paint cost six bucks, so no issue there, however I think I'll get another can to get the best cover possible. I'm concerned about the hoop. After getting a good sanding a heavy coat of ebony stain was applied, yet it didn't drink it up like I'd like. It'll be interesting to see how it does after several more applications.

One other note. I decided I really like using the planer to get those edges down. Yes, patience proved once again to be lacking after noting how bad the thirteen inch tom reso edge was (similar to the twelve inch). This time I retracted the planer blade to where it barely cut. The result was an easier operation resulting in a smoother edge, the problem resolved. I feel the reso edge issue is now behind me, and in what will seem only moments, the rest of the story (RIP Paul Harvey).

Yer' right drumhead, a lot of fun, relaxing, and rewarding. Wish somebodied pay me for this... lol

Yeah Dean, Snakes is a tune one of my bands jams, and I only have it on a cd with other band songs I was given. And yer' right again, I don't know how to quote anyone or how to put dialogue between pictures as I've seen done. I guess as a geek, I basically suck!
 

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Elvis

Silver Member
Al,

How do you know when your plane is flat?
Are you eyeballing it, or does your plane have a level on it?

Thanks for getting back to me on the song again.
Think you could find it on youtube?
just post the link, or mail it to me, whatever.

As for posting quotes, you could use the little button in the lower right hand corner of each reply that says "quote".
You'll see the text in the box that you normally write your responses in.
If you want to edit the quote, you can just put your cursor in that text and backspace all the parts away, that you don't want to include, OR, you If you hold down the left click on your mouse and move it across those unwanted parts, you can highlight the parts you want to get rid of, then just hit backspace once and it all that highlighted stuff goes away.
...OR...you can just leave it and respond to the entire quote.

As for spacing text around pictures, you have to place the pictures in the post yourself (so if you're using the attachment feature, it won't work).

This means the picture will have to appear somewhere on the net, like an online photo album (Flickr, Webshots and Photobucket are all pretty popular, but not the only ones out there), then you'll need to copy the url of the photo itself and paste that url into the post you're creating.
On each end of that url you'll need to include a couple of pieces of code.
UBB code for an image is

Same format with other things; a quote is "quote" then "/quote", a link is "url" then "/url" (I think that happens automatically here, though).
You can also write text into a link, such as Visit Drummerworld! by altering the link code to read "url=", then you write in or paste the url to the link and follow that with the other bracket ( ] ). The you write the text and follow that with the other half of the code "/url".
Replace all the quotes I've written with brackets [ ] (this post didn't work when I used the brackets, so I used quotes instead, but you need to format it just as I showed you with the image format above. Only the lettering inside the bracket changes, depending on what action you want to take place).


Hope that didn't give you a headache. I know, the learning curve is a little steep for all of us at one time or another.


Elvis
 

Elvis

Silver Member
Al,

How do you know when your plane is flat?
Are you eyeballing it, or does your plane have a level on it?

Thanks for getting back to me on the song again.
Think you could find it on youtube?
just post the link, or mail it to me, whatever.

As for posting quotes, you could use the little button in the lower right hand corner of each reply that says "quote".
You'll see the text in the box that you normally write your responses in.
If you want to edit the quote, you can just put your cursor in that text and backspace all the parts away, that you don't want to include, OR, you If you hold down the left click on your mouse and move it across those unwanted parts, you can highlight the parts you want to get rid of, then just hit backspace once and it all that highlighted stuff goes away.
...OR...you can just leave it and respond to the entire quote.

As for spacing text around pictures, you have to place the pictures in the post yourself (so if you're using the attachment feature, it won't work).

This means the picture will have to appear somewhere on the net, like an online photo album (Flickr, Webshots and Photobucket are all pretty popular, but not the only ones out there), then you'll need to copy the url of the photo itself and paste that url into the post you're creating.
On each end of that url you'll need to include a couple of pieces of code.
UBB code for an image is

Same format with other things; a quote is "quote" then "/quote", a link is "url" then "/url" (I think that happens automatically here, though).
You can also write text into a link, such as Visit Drummerworld! by altering the link code to read "url=", then you write in or paste the url to the link and follow that with the other bracket ( ] ). The you write the text and follow that with the other half of the code "/url".
Replace all the quotes I've written with brackets [ ] (this post didn't work when I used the brackets, so I used quotes instead, but you need to format it just as I showed you with the image format above. Only the lettering inside the bracket changes, depending on what action you want to take place).


Hope that didn't give you a headache. I know, the learning curve is a little steep for all of us at one time or another.


Elvis
Al,

This is an example of what the post looks like when you use the little "quote" button in the lower right hand corner of the reply you're responding to.
...and if you post a response then remember you wanted to add something else, just click the little "edit" button next to it and you can edit your post.



Elvis
 

intheruff

Senior Member
Al,

How do you know when your plane is flat?
Are you eyeballing it, or does your plane have a level on it?

Elvis
When using the hand planer it was amazing how level it remained while circumventing the edge. Put a flat surface at least 7" long on a drums edge, and because of the curve of the drum the flat surface (planer) will find a level that is, among all things, level, haha. To check whether the edges were level I didn't use a 'level', but instead used a carpenters square across the top to check opposing edges (180 degrees) to see whether they were the same, and they were. Does that make sense? Kind of hard to word it. Today I'll lay a level on those edges to ensure the results. Good idea.
 

intheruff

Senior Member
Yeah, that made perfect sense.
Great variation on the "truing an edge" idea.

Elvis
Ok, because of your suggestion to check the levels I discovered the two mounted toms were tweeked yet. Based on several measurements taken from the inside of the reinforcement hoop, both drums were up to an eighth on an inch out. So I marked the high side and again applied the planner (I'm getten' pretty good at that sucker) and was able to get the edges nearly (there's that word again) level/flat/perpendicular/parallel as can be expected. I'm glad I checked it the way I did, measuring from the reinforcement hoop. Good idea... sonny... hehe
 

Elvis

Silver Member
Not a problem....gramps =)

Now for the "acid test". Pop a head on there and see how she sounds.
If you're using the heads that came off it, you might have to reform the collar (where the head seats against the edge).
You can do this with a hair dryer (if you don't have a new head ready to go, that is).
Just becareful not to melt the head when softening it up.


Elvis
 

intheruff

Senior Member
Yesterday I bot new heads. The coated Emperors, top and bottom, are somewhat classic to these drums and give the drums 'that' look they were noted for. I popped the heads on the 12" and the sound was awsome. Full, not a bunch of ringy overtones, and compared to the single Remo PS that was on the drum before this project, well... there is no comparison. Now I 'm especially anxious to get these suckers finished. There's been a total expenditure of 160 bucks and there's probably another bill to go. Chicken scratch! And to think, I'm essentially getting a new classic vintage set of drums to play. I'm going to use them in smaller venues for sure! I didn't realize the project would be this much fun and rewarding. Once they're completed the Tamas are going to be put up for a while so these things can be retrained and beat into submission. hehehe

Today I'll finish mounting the lugs and heads and then do additional polishing on the worst chrome pieces. I still need a bass drum hoop and think I've located one for twenty bucks. It doesn't have a P red insert, but instead is all wood, it can be sanded and stained to match the original and then mounted on the reso side of the bass. Not keeping to tradition, I plan to use regular lug screws on the batter side of the bass drum instead of the wing-nut type original screws. The reso head will have the originals wing-nut fashioned screws.

Because I'm leaving the country for a couple of weeks, I may not be completed by the time I leave. But as soon as completed I'll post several pictures of the final product in all its summers of love style. Oh yeah...
 

intheruff

Senior Member
Today I'll finish mounting the lugs and heads and then do additional polishing on the worst chrome pieces.

..
Never seen anyone respond to their own post, but because it's pertinent, thought I'd give it a try. The mystery of how to remove those small rust deposits that seem impossible to remove with either steel wool or soaking in Brasso has been solved (by me that is). Again, impatience pays yet another dividend. After toiling the rusty chrome without satisfactory results, the thought to try a rotary tool (Dremel) came to mind. Mine came with a small, relatively soft wire-buffing tool. I gave it a try and presto, the rust disappeared and now those rusty old pieces posted previously on this thread look great. Now to brave the snowstorm and head to town to procure the rest of what I need.

I believe the pics are self-explanatory.
 

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Elvis

Silver Member
Nice work, Al, and if we don't hear from you for a while, good luck on your trip.

Seeing that wire wheel on your dremel reminds me of a humorous tale I once heard about a guy who wanted to "polish" his cymbals so they looked nice.
His solution was a big ol' angle head grinder and a heavy grit disc.

...oh, yeah, I'm sure they "polished up", real nice. =))



Elvis
 

intheruff

Senior Member
Seeing that wire wheel on your dremel reminds me of a humorous tale I once heard about a guy who wanted to "polish" his cymbals so they looked nice.
His solution was a big ol' angle head grinder and a heavy grit disc.

...oh, yeah, I'm sure they "polished up", real nice. =))



Elvis
LOL, ya', you can't tell me fresh ground/cut/pulverized brass don't shine up real nice like.

It turns out 'they' make a brass polishing wheel better than the one in the pic... so I got a couple and finished the polishing. Now some stripping and staining needs to be done on the newly aquired, yet very old bass drum hoop. Then final assembly.

But first, the tom holder fell apart in my hands today. Hmmm... A couple of hard self tapping stainless steel screws, a gob of glue for such purposes and presto, ready to commence their intent again (I just hope this glue holds).
 

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HeadRush

Senior Member
I'm really enjoying following this thread
you're doing great and it looks like it will turn out amazing
 

Elvis

Silver Member
Hey Al,

The natural finish on the "new" BD hoop looks real nice....maybe you wanna strip the black paint off the other one and see how the BD looks with two of puppies on there?

I see where the tom holder fell apart.
I think a roll pin was what went in there.
I have a breaker bar that my dad gave me, and the "joint" on that one was pinned with a home-made roll pin.
Just took a small strip of sheet metal and rolled it up, until it was small enough for a press fit.
Then I'd use a small ball pean to drive it home.
Worked like a champ and if it ever fell apart, I'd just roll up some more sheet metal and replace it.
...of course you can buy actual roll pins for pennies at any hardware store (in case the screws and glue don't take).
You just have to know what size roll pin ya need.



Elivs
 

intheruff

Senior Member
Well, as alloted time allows, this is the 'finished' restoration. Thanks to all of you that offered advice, I needed it. As you can see Dean, I stripped the back hoop and stained it to match the front. After some hee n' hawen' the bass drum ended up with the wing-tension rods I said I wasn't gonna' use... turns out I liked it better this way. There's still a few bugs to iron out and my cousin in Ca. has an original tom holder that survived his studios fire that he's offered me, thanks Jim, I'll get back to you on that. So after returning home from afar, I'll finish up the details and then have some fun retraining these puppies. But for the pupose of this thread, which was to share with you a worthwhile project, is complete. I hope you enjoyed the venture. And btw, I know I've said it before, but the drums sound just awsome!!! Good day...
 

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