Restoration Attempt

KamaK

Platinum Member
What is a “stencil kit”?
It refers to a manufacturing methodology that was in use in the 1960's where tooling was directed via stencil'ed markings rather than individual measurement or machine automation. It is often associated with MIJ kits of that era, but was also used by other domestic and foreign manufacturers.
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
The bass drum, snare, and one of the rack toms all share the Autocrat badge. My guess was the "original" kit came that way. Pretty much all the manufactures offered those, back then. And then sometime later .... someone added the second rack tom and floor tom.

I'd be partial to keeping the original wrap ..... and the three original pieces. The Broadway and Slingerland ..... keep them if you find it more enjoyable to bang on a 5 piece kit.

Here's a thread on de-yellowing wrap .... http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/index.php?threads/retrobright-experience.130218/
 

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lem

Member
It refers to a manufacturing methodology that was in use in the 1960's where tooling was directed via stencil'ed markings rather than individual measurement or machine automation. It is often associated with MIJ kits of that era, but was also used by other domestic and foreign manufacturers.
So, copy of a copy of a copy?
 

lem

Member
The bass drum, snare, and one of the rack toms all share the Autocrat badge. My guess was the "original" kit came that way. Pretty much all the manufactures offered those, back then. And then sometime later .... someone added the second rack tom and floor tom.

I'd be partial to keeping the original wrap ..... and the three original pieces. The Broadway and Slingerland ..... keep them if you find it more enjoyable to bang on a 5 piece kit.

Here's a thread on de-yellowing wrap .... http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/index.php?threads/retrobright-experience.130218/
Thanks for the link, I'll let you know how it works out.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
So, copy of a copy of a copy?
Sort of. Build a drum to completion, then make a flexible stencil of the hole placement. Subsequent runs just cut the stencil. Same for the wrap.

Stencils allow you to make manual cuts without having to do measurement/layout, and is an early form of automation. They were huge back in the days that people would make their own clothes. You'd order the stencil of an outfit, buy some fabric, cut the pieces according to the stencil, pin it up on yourself to adjust fitment, and sew.
 
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