Restoration Attempt

lem

Member
Well, I'm committed. Approaching this project with some trepedation as I know very little about drums and drumming. Thanks to others on this site, I was able to identify, date (maybe) and decide to try to get this old kit together for my Grandaughter. Started this morning and immediatly had difficulty removing the pedal mechanism from the drum itself. I see a cog? with a threaded key comming out of where the attachement is. Turned it both ways not seeing much movement on the cog but seemed to have tightened the connection. I don't know how much torque drums can stand so some advice here would be helpful. Moved on and was able to get hoops, skins and other parts off the drum. I nearly dropped a nut when the back hoop/skin popped off. I thought I was into a rat nest. Do drummers routinely stuff there drums and why. Please see attached pictures and give me more ideas. Next will be addressing how best to remove/repair the leg nuts.before.jpgbefore1.jpgexternal damage l.jpgpedal mechanism.jpgbefore.jpgbefore1.jpgexternal damage l.jpgenternal damage r.jpgsupprise!.jpgfront skin.jpgback skin.jpginternal damage l.jpginternal damage r.jpgpedal mechanism.jpg
 

Old Dog new Cans

Senior Member
I'll start backwards. . .the "stuffing" is simply used to dampen the ringing and overtones of the drum. That is very normal. . .A pillow, blanket, actual dampening product made by a drum company.

As far as your fixes. . . .you'll need a lot of WD40 to loosen the rust on the wing nut that has the bass pedal locked. I'm sure someone will add to that.

For me personally, I DO NOT KNOW if I would take on the attempted repair work of where the "legs" or spurs were/are attached to the bass drum. That looks like a lot of filler to me. Maybe a patch job--that includes cutting out a circular portion and gluing in some wood??? Man, that looks difficult. Are you planning on re-wrapping or finishing them differently? Are you just going to leave the existing wrap?

There are a ton of vids on YouTube about restoration and refurb'ing old funky drums. RDavidR, has a channel, and has many good tips that I have used.

Good luck to ya.
 
Great to hear that you're doing this!
Given the overall condition and how much stuff there is to fix, I'd keep it simple and use epoxy resin to fill the holes. Remove dust and splinters first, add a good adhesive tape to the outside, fill the hole. Then, I'd drill a new hole with a hole saw into the dry epoxy resin. The legs will cover up pretty much all of the fixed area and it's on the bottom of the drum anyway. Not very pretty but cheap and fast.
87599
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
In regards to the spurs ..... patching the shell is do-able ..... but it's more a matter of "is it in your skill set"? Also, using the original spurs ..... they failed once ..... they'll probably fail again. There's a reason why the "big nail" spur have pretty much been abandoned by drum builders.

So .... you might want to consider going to a more modern design spur .... or going with a "retro designed" modern spur.
 

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Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
After repairing the holes in the bass drum, I would reverse the bass drum front to back. In other words use the batter end as the reso end. So that when you re-install the spurs, they will be installed in wood that has never been drilled before. This idea would depend on the brackets on top of the bass drum and how you will use those brackets. And yes, install newer type bass drum spurs.

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lem

Member
After repairing the holes in the bass drum, I would reverse the bass drum front to back. In other words use the batter end as the reso end. So that when you re-install the spurs, they will be installed in wood that has never been drilled before. This idea would depend on the brackets on top of the bass drum and how you will use those brackets. And yes, install newer type bass drum spurs.
OK, I like both reversing front to back, and some kind of "new leg. Within the drum body are two large felt? things. I assume I would have to reverse these as well. I'll inspect damage closely tomorrow and plan accordingly. Got that obstinate pedal assembly off...all it took was some wd 40 and a BFH. Learning that drums can take some abuse. In whatever form my restoration/repair takes, how much effect on desired sound could it make? Does one "tune" drums like a guitar, or just stuff them with whatever to get desired sound? I'm assuming that the drum body is a resonance chamber, so to speak, and alterations (my repair) would interfere with desired/designed sound. Or, is it not that critical. Teach me!
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GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Patching of the leg holes should be cutting circular plugs the size of the round holes where the lugs were. They should be glued in using a wood glue like Tite-Bond, Then I would re-wrap the drums, and on the inside find washers that are bigger than the wooden plugs you used. Hardware items not drum store items. Then the hardware of the leg will make a sandwich of the washers and wood plug. From the inside out will be washer, wood plug, drum shell, new wrap, leg mount. This should make for a sturdy repair.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
After repairing the holes in the bass drum, I would reverse the bass drum front to back. In other words use the batter end as the reso end. So that when you re-install the spurs, they will be installed in wood that has never been drilled before. This idea would depend on the brackets on top of the bass drum and how you will use those brackets. And yes, install newer type bass drum spurs.

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this would not be a bad idea if you are going to re-wrap the drum.
 

lem

Member
When you guys suggesst a "re-wrap", I guess you mean just that. Questions: How tough is it to get the old stuff and conversely, the new stuff on (process?) Expensive? Isd this stuff drum specific or like a bolt of fabric. What do I do about the OTHER 4 drums in the set. Is it OK to mix and match? Thanks, non-drummer.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
lem:
I think you should have someone restore these drum for you. Tell them what results you expect and get a quote for the cost.

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harryconway

Platinum Member
You're looking at about $100 for a sheet of wrap from Precision Drum Co. The problem with doing a re-wrap, is the new wrap won't match the old. And of course .... re-wrapping the whole kit will be more expensive.

This is a MIJ (Made in Japan) stencil kit, is it not? And if that's the case ..... you can quickly start putting more money into the drums than they're actually worth.

As far as the current damage to the shell ..... if all you did was put new heads on the drum and some clamp on spurs ..... your drum would be functional ..... and patching the holes or leaving them isn't going to effect the sound much, if at all. I have an old Ludwig 22x14 shell with a much larger hole in it ..... and while is looks like hell ...... it plays fine.

Getting the old wrap off. Might be real easy, or it might be a bear. Depends on how much glue was used. Sometimes the old wrap will almost fall off once you take off the hardware. Essentially the lugs are holding it on. Other times, you need a lot of patience, a heat gun and a small, flat pry tool (like a butter knife or putty knife).

Seeing those small bolts on either side of the spurs, I think those were the original spur mount holes ..... and someone added the "straight nail" type spur later. If you have a floor tom for this kit ..... see if the floor tom leg mounts have the same hole pattern. If that's the case .... then the original spurs were fold out (another old design).
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
This is a MIJ (Made in Japan) stencil kit, is it not? And if that's the case ..... you can quickly start putting more money into the drums than they're actually worth.
This is a Made in England stencil kit, in the same manner that Kent is a Made in USA stencil kit.

I agree with the above. There are two ways that I've seen people repair stuff like this.

1: Clean the break, refit the broken piece, and epoxy.
and
2: Cut out the damage, cut matching piece out of mechanically similar cheap donor drum. Fit and Titebond.

If I were going the preservationist route, I'd go with #1 and try to save the wrap.

If I were going the refurbish route, I'd probably go with #2 and order new wrap.
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
OK .... I went back to your 1st thread and looked at the floor tom. And I'm even more convinced this drum originally had fold out spurs. So again, see if the floor tom leg holder has the same pattern as the bass drum. Pictures are of the type of spurs I'm referring to.

And if that's the case .... this might make your repair job easier. The leg mount (and fabricate/use an interior backing plate) will add structural support to any repair you do. And possibly hide some of the imperfection that may result.
 

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lem

Member
lem:
I think you should have someone restore these drum for you. Tell them what results you expect and get a quote for the cost.

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Nah! That would be giving up. These drums have a history, good bad or indifferent. Each dent, ding, scratch, extra hole, is part of that history. Probably had more than a few owners, and they are also part of their history. I see my job as helping preserve that history as best I can and therefore become part of it.
 
I think that rewrapping and buying all kinds of replacement parts is over the top for these drums. In the end, it won't be a sought-after kit in collector's grade anyway and it will probably be played at home by a young drummer, so I'd keep everything that's still functional for now.
The wood around the bass drum spurs might have broken during transportation or while in storage. I don't think it's necessary to invest $50 to get new spurs if these drums stay mostly at home but that's just my opinion, of course.
 

lem

Member
I tend to agree, also given the fact that due to obvious modifications, the Slingerland floor drum etc., the Kit will never be original. But I am having a good time playing around. This morning I clamped my "wet wood" pieces to the drum to capture the curvature. I will let them air dry and see what happens when de-clamped. While waiting for this I began to think about the cleaning process, specifically overcoming the color variation on the Base and small tom toms due to age,abuse, nicotine? etc. My question is...leave the patina of age or go for a more uniform look. I' doubt that I will re-wrap but have been giving thought to other options. Maybe a Steam Punk look or possibly glitter paint job. I might make these the Rat Rod of drum kits. Thoughts?
 

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trickg

Silver Member
In regards to the spurs ..... patching the shell is do-able ..... but it's more a matter of "is it in your skill set"? Also, using the original spurs ..... they failed once ..... they'll probably fail again. There's a reason why the "big nail" spur have pretty much been abandoned by drum builders.

So .... you might want to consider going to a more modern design spur .... or going with a "retro designed" modern spur.
Definitely go with a new style of spurs. It's going to depend on where the holes are, but you may be able to install a new style spur over the existing hole - it's just going to depend on how things are set up.
 
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lem

Member
Definitely go with a new style of spurs. It's going to depend on where the holes are, but you may be able to install a new style spur over the existing hole - it's just going to depend on how things are set up.
My skills are legendary. I am old, seen and done a lot...I learned. But, I will use anything that will make my life easier. I like the idea of retro spurs as I am a retro kind of guy. Again, this is never going to be like the original, so I guess that doesn't matter. If I decide to go really ape-shit and do a steam punk or rat rod type thing instead of a re-wrap, you might bee suprised with what I come up with. Anyway, thanks for the advice, I'll look into it
 
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