Requesting Help Finding Drums

Invicta

Junior Member
I am requesting help as I am a bit overwhelmed with the sheer multitude of options in the drum market today. A great problem to have, right? I know the drum sound I like in my head but have so far not been able to translate that over to the right drums. I have noticed a couple things: I tend to favor maple drums and triple flange hoops. I should mention I play mostly metal and hard rock. I use a fair amount of intricate double bass patterns.

What I am after:
- projecting
- warm
- resonant
- low fundamental
- large diameters

I have tried Tama Starclassic maple (drums sounded a little thin and I didn't like the diecast hoops), Pearl MCX (drums sounded powerful and projecting but not very resonant and I didn't like the diecast hoops, I also had a very hard time tuning the floor tom low enough), Ludwig Classic Maple (probably closest to what I like I have found, the bass drum was my favorite, but the toms were too sharp on attack and had a hard time tuning low enough again).

Drums I haven't tried that are on my mind: DW Performance, Tama Artstar 2, Pearl Reference.

I'm being picky because I have played for 30 years and want to buy my forever set. Money isn't an issue but I want to spend it wisely.

* I should add I have been leaning towards DW Performance because they seem to be able to tune super low and are super resonant and warm. My only fear there is they are thin-ish shells and may not be able to project very well without drum mics. I have also heard a lot of clips of them sounding very cardboard-ish without mics.

Any help would be great. Thanks.
 
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drumnut87

Well-known member
sounds like you want a set made of birch, they have low fundamentals and are warm & resonant :)
 

Invicta

Junior Member
sounds like you want a set made of birch, they have low fundamentals and are warm & resonant :)
I have read birch are designed for studio work. I play live acoustic and in my own practice space mostly. I have tried Tama Granstars and I really didn't like how much attack they had and felt like they lacked body, but those are REALLY thick drums.
 

drumnut87

Well-known member
I have read birch are designed for studio work. I play live acoustic and in my own practice space mostly. I have tried Tama Granstars and I really didn't like how much attack they had and felt like they lacked body, but those are REALLY thick drums.
they do like studio work, but ive teched for peopel who have birch drums live and they work well :) could also look into beech and mahogany? :) yeah thick shells have a higher fundamental pitch ive found.
 

Rotarded

Senior Member
The DW Performance lacks just a bit of the midrange warmth and resonance, but you should try one out if possible. DW Maple/Mahogany hybrid fits your criteria to a T.
Also another vote to try the Ludwig Legacy Mahogany as well.

Disclaimer: I am not a DW Fanboi!
 

Invicta

Junior Member
Damn, you guys know a lot about drums. I am in the right place. Thanks guys. I kind of half expected to get flamed because I am being so picky. "Just play", etc. But, I'd like to smile when I hit my drums instead of put sound canceling headphones on and just forget about it.

So I need to look towards thinner/medium shells, birch or maple/mahogany mixes, rounder edges. Hopefully they will still cut through heavy metal music I play.
 

Rotarded

Senior Member
For metal, there's always Stainless Steel.... Muahahahahahahahaha!
 

Invicta

Junior Member
Are Pearl Reference drums worth a go? They have mixed in Mahogany and round over edges with the bigger diameter drums? The Reference are thicker than the Reference Pure but I have read Reference Pure are more for recording and small gigs, so I would go with Reference.
 

Fritz Frigursson

Senior Member
Are Pearl Reference drums worth a go? They have mixed in Mahogany and round over edges with the bigger diameter drums? The Reference are thicker than the Reference Pure but I have read Reference Pure are more for recording and small gigs, so I would go with Reference.
you seemed pretty determined on that particular kit, you should just get that
 

Invicta

Junior Member
you seemed pretty determined on that particular kit, you should just get that
No I’m not set on anything. If you read the whole thread you’ll notice those particular drums include a number of things that have been suggested to me. This is why I brought them up. I’m open to any suggestions.
 

Fritz Frigursson

Senior Member
No I’m not set on anything. If you read the whole thread you’ll notice those particular drums include a number of things that have been suggested to me. This is why I brought them up. I’m open to any suggestions.
honestly any drum can sound like any drum. Every drum is resonant, every drum can sound "warm" with the right heads and muffling and every drum is projecting. It's a matter of hardware preference, tiny sound differences and most importantly appearance that are the biggest differences. Just buy any drum you like and you will like it. if you are after a particular sound then get some mics and a DAW because processing and effects are the biggest sound alterers, not drum material or how "projecting" and "warm" the kit is.
 

Ransan

Senior Member
I have read birch are designed for studio work. I play live acoustic and in my own practice space mostly. I have tried Tama Granstars and I really didn't like how much attack they had and felt like they lacked body, but those are REALLY thick drums.
Yes birch is focused and cutting aka pre-eq’d, which is quite the opposite of what your after.

Any heavy ply maple kit would suit your warm, resonant, projection needs.
 

Liam

Active member
Another option would be Sonor, SQ1 is not very customizable but you could get SQ2 and make a custom birch drum set, you can also select other wood, shell types, and shell thickness, finish, hardware. I have included the link to both of those drum lines.

Sonor SQ1
Sonor SQ2
 

Invicta

Junior Member
Yes birch is focused and cutting aka pre-eq’d, which is quite the opposite of what your after.

Any heavy ply maple kit would suit your warm, resonant, projection needs.
This seems right on the money with what I’ve experienced as well. I’ll take your advice and seek out a heavy ply maple kit. Thanks man.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
What I am after:
- projecting
- warm
- resonant
- low fundamental
- large diameters
Everything is great here...except projection generally means thick shells. Which counters the warmth/resonance/requirement. Warm, resonant, low fundamental...large diameter thin shells will give you all of this. But projection too? If you play unmiced, thicker shells will offer more "cut" If you play miced then absolutely thin FTW

TBH I don't know that there's that much volume difference between thick and thin shells. Maybe certain frequencies will be accentuated, but overall decibels (not perceived volume) IMO are not too far from each other. Perceived volume will normally go to the thicker shell for most perceived volume. Which doesn't necessarily mean it's louder on a decibel meter.

The less mass something has, the lower fundamental it will have, fact. So right there thin shells have less mass and generally a lower fundamental. Thicker shell, more mass, higher fundamental. Lug/hardware weight comes into play here as well
 

Invicta

Junior Member
Everything is great here...except projection generally means thick shells. Which counters the warmth/resonance/requirement. Warm, resonant, low fundamental...large diameter thin shells will give you all of this. But projection too? If you play unmiced, thicker shells will offer more "cut" If you play miced then absolutely thin FTW

TBH I don't know that there's that much volume difference between thick and thin shells. Maybe certain frequencies will be accentuated, but overall decibels (not perceived volume) IMO are not too far from each other. Perceived volume will normally go to the thicker shell for most perceived volume. Which doesn't necessarily mean it's louder on a decibel meter.

The less mass something has, the lower fundamental it will have, fact. So right there thin shells have less mass and generally a lower fundamental. Thicker shell, more mass, higher fundamental. Lug/hardware weight comes into play here as well
As usual you’re right on. There in lines the real question of this thread: how much louder are thicker shells vs thinner shells? Perhaps it’s only a mere fraction.
 

Ransan

Senior Member
Everything is great here...except projection generally means thick shells. Which counters the warmth/resonance/requirement. Warm, resonant, low fundamental...large diameter thin shells will give you all of this. But projection too? If you play unmiced, thicker shells will offer more "cut" If you play miced then absolutely thin FTW

TBH I don't know that there's that much volume difference between thick and thin shells. Maybe certain frequencies will be accentuated, but overall decibels (not perceived volume) IMO are not too far from each other. Perceived volume will normally go to the thicker shell for most perceived volume. Which doesn't necessarily mean it's louder on a decibel meter.

The less mass something has, the lower fundamental it will have, fact. So right there thin shells have less mass and generally a lower fundamental. Thicker shell, more mass, higher fundamental. Lug/hardware weight comes into play here as well
Hi Uncle Larry I did want to add that sensitivity would be at stake the more plies added.

It’s known that more plies give more projection, which is why increased plies were popular in the 80s and 90s amongst arena rockers, ala Ludwig Coliseum 10 ply and Eric Singer snare 😉.

Thin shells are more sensitive/responsive and less projection generally.

7247B822-4278-45F8-B250-D4AAECEFDC30.png
Source: http://www.drumarchive.com/Pearl/PearlMWGUIDE2.pdf
 
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yammyfan

Senior Member
DW Design Series might fit the bill nicely. Shells are slightly thicker than the Performance and Collectors Series drums and they project really well. All North American maple, graduated triple flanged hoops. Great all-around drum kits.
 
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