Replace a Famous Drummer to Make the Band Sound Better

cbphoto

Gold Member
Steven Adler really doesnt get much love and I dunno why. I absolutely love everything he did with GnR. He wasnt all that fancy, but he definitely drove the band.

Bill Ward is the man.
I prefer Adler’s drumming, and I think the recording production was better when he was with the band.

And Bill Ward fought demons and band members in Sabbath.

 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Platinum Member

Ransan

Senior Member
Hasn’t Nick Barker covered the metal genre already?

Bill Ward drumming for Ozzy, apologies to one of my heroes Randy Castillo.
 

Lefty Phillips

Regular Poster
I keep looking at this thread, but I don't have a good idea who could replace Nick Mason in Pink Floyd. I love Pink Floyd, but the drumming is often sort of flat. Maybe it's the way they mixed some songs, but I wonder what you guys think...
 

doggyd69b

Drum Expert
I'm going to my grave with this...i don't think Portnoy would be loose and rocky enough for RUSH...hes to stiff..to calculated. The guy that would be thee replacement in every way and then some is Simon Phillips. Considering his body of work and fitting supremely with everyone from fusion..to rock etc etc I believe that even Neil Peart worshipers would go whoa..hes the guy..man!. Yup.
Not a fan of portnoy..or peart or prog rock for that matter but portnoy can play lose... watch him in the cover of
DIO'S we rock... he is definitely loose in that one. I said im not a fan but I recognize their talent. ( before the villagers sharpen their pitchforks)
 
I keep looking at this thread, but I don't have a good idea who could replace Nick Mason in Pink Floyd. I love Pink Floyd, but the drumming is often sort of flat. Maybe it's the way they mixed some songs, but I wonder what you guys think...
I get where you're coming from. Of the major prog or arena rock bands of the 70s--since Pink Floyd straddles the line, or is in the middle of the Venn diagram, with a (to mix metaphors even more) foot in each camp, with Yes, Genesis, King Crimson and ELP on one side and The Who, The Stones and Led Zeppelin on the other--Nick Mason is the least technically accomplished drummer.

But he's also got a recognizable style, which as many of us know, is no small thing. His playing on Live at Pompei is so recognizably him that if you've never done it before, give it a listen and you'll be surprised how quickly you realize you know his feel quite well indeed. What's more, as the Waters lyrics and Gilmour guitar became ever more prominent, Mason pulled back and back on his own playing in order to let the song blossom--his earlier playing, when they were sort of London's version of a Bay Area long-form jam band, was quite a bit more freakout.

And he kept getting better. I think most of us agree that there cannot be a truly great band without a great drummer. Well, you don't get a Dark Side of the Moon-level success with there being any weak spots. Think of (most obviously, perhaps) the rototom intro to "Time" — nothing there most drummers couldn't do after playing for somewhere between a few months and a few years. But damn sam does it fit so beautifully in a way that perhaps something trickier, with faster or more complicated playing, wouldn't. It's one of the few extended drum parts that most fans of classic rock can probably sing in their sleep. And he's got the nice easy groove on "Breathe" and the 7/4 groove on "Money" and the slight funk of "Any Colour You Like" and the nice waltz groove on "Eclipse" and it's all good.

On the next album, he's got the long jammy multiple moods of "Shine On," he's got the off-kilter slow hard funk of "Have a Cigar," he's got his patented swaying cool groove on "Wish You Were." And it's all good.

He kicks out the jams on Animals, with his intro fill on "Dogs" one of my favorites by anyone ever and a nice, legit hard swing on "Sheep." Always playing just what the song requires and no more--his ride cymbal timekeeping on the "stone" section of "Dogs" is so damn good and it's just quarter notes. But it's exactly what's called for and fits like a damn glove.

And then came the impossible Wall project and he played the arena rock pastiche "Young Lust," the kicass stomp of "Run Like Hell," the perfect disco groove of "Another Brick in the Wall" and so much more. Yes, he had to step aside for "Mother," but even that's impressive--just as Gilmour (David freakin' Gilmour!) brought in another guitarist on the album, so did Mason step aside and let the demonstrably superior Jeff Porcaro take over, rather than risk the extremely tight deadline and finally get the track down himself; the way he put the needs of the music and the band ahead of his ego feels like a great example of just how excellent a fit he was.

He's also one of the great interviewees in rock and roll. When I was a teenager, I'd listen to Collins and Bruford and Bonham and Moonie and think Nick Mason was weak tea in comparison. Then about 15 years ago I realized he was every bit as perfect for his band as they were for theirs. (Including playing the role it seems many drummers do, and being something of a peacekeeper...when they're not the kind of drummer that's the unpredictable TNT under the mattress.)
 

opentune

Platinum Member
I keep looking at this thread, but I don't have a good idea who could replace Nick Mason in Pink Floyd. I love Pink Floyd, but the drumming is often sort of flat. Maybe it's the way they mixed some songs, but I wonder what you guys think...
Nick Mason would completely agree with you, his drumming is understated, he is not chops guy and fully admits so. But your statement says it all - he's not very replaceable given his taste in what to play, and what space to not play.

I think Nigel Olsson could substitute for Nick quite well. He played with lots of space in some Elton songs.
 

Black page

Junior Member
Replace Josh Freese with Sting ... Fast.... His overactive posture en way of playing makes me turn it off.... With... Vinnie is a easy one to choose, but I would pick Matt Garstka...
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I keep looking at this thread, but I don't have a good idea who could replace Nick Mason in Pink Floyd. I love Pink Floyd, but the drumming is often sort of flat. Maybe it's the way they mixed some songs, but I wonder what you guys think...

I'm quite the opposite. I think what he did was fantastic. I can not play a ballad without being influenced by Nick's sense of time and space that he left in between the notes.
 

ToneT

Drum Expert
Nick Mason would completely agree with you, his drumming is understated, he is not chops guy and fully admits so. But your statement says it all - he's not very replaceable given his taste in what to play, and what space to not play.

I think Nigel Olsson could substitute for Nick quite well. He played with lots of space in some Elton songs.
Totally agreed! The ballad master would be perfect for them.
 

Lefty Phillips

Regular Poster
Nick Mason would completely agree with you, his drumming is understated, he is not chops guy and fully admits so. But your statement says it all - he's not very replaceable given his taste in what to play, and what space to not play.

I think Nigel Olsson could substitute for Nick quite well. He played with lots of space in some Elton songs.
Oh, Nigel Olsson. I like that idea.

Pink Floyd is one of my favorite bands. I guess I didn't word my post properly; I didn't mean to imply that Mason was incompetent or anything like that. Plenty of examples to refute that notion on various albums.

It's probably the mix, or maybe just the nature of Pink Floyd's music. I wish the drums were more present on some of the tracks where they're a bit buried.
 
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