Renowns...I get it now!

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
So, I had an opportunity to NOT have to unload my entire drum set this weekend at one of the venues we played. Instead, I played a set of the newer Gretsch Renowns which was the house kit. I noticed that they didn't have the silver sealer inside, but they were finished quite well! They were flawless! They had a set of clear emperors on the batters and the factory single-ply clear heads on the reso sides. Wow! What a terrific sound! Now, I'm gonna go get a set of emperors for my CM kit. Those drums were stellar, and I would NEVER hesitate to play a set like that again. I've played an older set of Renowns, and they were great; however, I played them in my basement which is a terrible room. It was nice to play one in a great venue! I also added my BB 14 x 8 snare and my Heartbeat cymbals. If the USA version of these sounds better, I really don't see how.


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harryconway

Platinum Member
If the USA version of these sounds better, I really don't see how.
There IS no USA version of the Renown. USA shells are 6 ply maple/gum. Broadkaster shells are 3 ply maple/poplar. Brooklyn shells are 6 ply maple/poplar. Renown shells are 7 ply maple (silver interior).
I think those are Renown Walnut, which had natural interiors.
Yes. I agree. And those would have 6 ply walnut/maple shells with natural interiors. Beautiful drums.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
There IS no USA version of the Renown. USA shells are 6 ply maple/gum. Broadkaster shells are 3 ply maple/poplar. Brooklyn shells are 6 ply maple/poplar. Renown shells are 7 ply maple (silver interior).

Sorry, I was unclear. I was trying to say that if the Gretsch USA drums are better, they can't be by much because these sounded so good to me.
 

J.D.

Active Member
Sorry, I was unclear. I was trying to say that if the Gretsch USA drums are better, they can't be by much because these sounded so good to me.
I forget where I saw it (maybe here), but someone who knew about Gretsch' Taiwanese factory said that they were VERY good at what they did. Like, the workers have a great job, and REALLY want to keep it, so they do excellent work. btw- I play Renowns at church, along with a Pork Pie snare.
 

vyacheslav

Senior Member
If the Brooklyns are Maple/Poplar and the Renown is 100% Maple, why are the Brooklyns so much more expensive? Is it because they are USA made and use USA Maple vs. the Renowns use Asian Maple and are assembled overseas?
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
If the Brooklyns are Maple/Poplar and the Renown is 100% Maple, why are the Brooklyns so much more expensive? Is it because they are USA made and use USA Maple vs. the Renowns use Asian Maple and are assembled overseas?
The assumption around poplar is it’s cheap wood. Well, it sorta is because it has no grain value, but it’s hard and not as easy to work with as assumed. Poplar does warm up the tone which is why Gretsch and other makers looking for a bit different sound use it in mid layers.
 

TK-421

Senior Member
If the Brooklyns are Maple/Poplar and the Renown is 100% Maple, why are the Brooklyns so much more expensive? Is it because they are USA made and use USA Maple vs. the Renowns use Asian Maple and are assembled overseas?
That’s pretty much correct, except Renowns use North American hard rock maple. Or at least they used to. Gretsch marketing materials mentioned 100% NA maple back in the old square badge days. Then when the RN-1s came out, they referred to the wood as a mixture of NA maple and a softer Asian maple. Now with the current RN-2s, they only say “Gretsch formula maple shells”, whatever that means.
 

pinstripe

Active Member
My nitpick with the Renown series is the bass drum depth. They're too deep! To get a BD that's not shaped like a beer can you have to go up to the 24". I'm also not crazy about the natural finished BD hoops especially against the pearl finishes. Aside from these quibbles, the Renowns seem like the sweet spot of the Gretsch lineup in terms of bang for your buck.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
My Renown bass drum is 20x16 and that doesn't seem weird to me at all. I've played shallower bass drums and I don't get what the hoopla is all about, to be honest.

To each their own, of course. As long as you're happy with your gear, that's what matters most.
 

J.D.

Active Member
My Renown bass drum is 20x16 and that doesn't seem weird to me at all. I've played shallower bass drums and I don't get what the hoopla is all about, to be honest.

To each their own, of course. As long as you're happy with your gear, that's what matters most.
Mine will be 22" x 18". I don't really plan on gigging with it, so it may never leave my house. It's *possible* I may someday order an 18" for dragging to gigs.
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
My Renown bass drum is 20x16 and that doesn't seem weird to me at all. I've played shallower bass drums and I don't get what the hoopla is all about, to be honest.

To each their own, of course. As long as you're happy with your gear, that's what matters most.

I think the shallower bass drum thing is good for people who play a lot of gigs.
Less hassle moving stuff around and fitting it into vehicles, takes up less stage space,
and a shallower drum will weigh less than a deeper one of the same type.
Not a great loss in sound either, just a different sound.

Of course, if you're not moving it around, most of that doesn't matter too much.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
The missing 4" sure helped me navigate around my practice room. It's a great way to fit a kit in smaller practice spaces too. Looks wise, I prefer the 14 or 16. Sound wise, I still prefer the 14 or 16, but if someone gave me a Renown with 18" deep kick, I'd gladly accept.
 
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